Merge branch 'drm-intel-next' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/anholt/drm-intel

* 'drm-intel-next' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/anholt/drm-intel:
  drm/i915: fix scheduling while holding the new active list spinlock
  drm/i915: Allow tiling of objects with bit 17 swizzling by the CPU.
  drm/i915: Correctly set the write flag for get_user_pages in pread.
  drm/i915: Fix use of uninitialized var in 40a5f0de
  drm/i915: indicate framebuffer restore key in SysRq help message
  drm/i915: sync hdmi detection by hdmi identifier with 2D
  drm/i915: Fix a mismerge of the IGD patch (new .find_pll hooks missed)
  drm/i915: Implement batch and ring buffer dumping
diff --git a/CREDITS b/CREDITS
index 9a93e3e2..2520ba6 100644
--- a/CREDITS
+++ b/CREDITS
@@ -1412,8 +1412,8 @@
 D: National Language Support
 D: Linux Internationalization Project
 D: German Localization for Linux and GNU software
-S: Kriemhildring 12a
-S: 65795 Hattersheim am Main
+S: Auf der Fittel 18
+S: 53347 Alfter
 S: Germany
 
 N: Christoph Hellwig
@@ -3580,6 +3580,12 @@
 D: Co-author of German book ``Linux-Kernel-Programmierung''
 D: Co-founder of Berlin Linux User Group
 
+N: Riku Voipio
+E: riku.voipio@iki.fi
+D: Author of PCA9532 LED and Fintek f75375s hwmon driver
+D: Some random ARM board patches
+S: Finland
+
 N: Patrick Volkerding
 E: volkerdi@ftp.cdrom.com
 D: Produced the Slackware distribution, updated the SVGAlib
diff --git a/Documentation/00-INDEX b/Documentation/00-INDEX
index 2a39aeb..d05737a 100644
--- a/Documentation/00-INDEX
+++ b/Documentation/00-INDEX
@@ -86,6 +86,8 @@
 	- describes the cache/TLB flushing interfaces Linux uses.
 cdrom/
 	- directory with information on the CD-ROM drivers that Linux has.
+cgroups/
+	- cgroups features, including cpusets and memory controller.
 connector/
 	- docs on the netlink based userspace<->kernel space communication mod.
 console/
@@ -98,8 +100,6 @@
 	- document describing how CPU load statistics are collected.
 cpuidle/
 	- info on CPU_IDLE, CPU idle state management subsystem.
-cpusets.txt
-	- documents the cpusets feature; assign CPUs and Mem to a set of tasks.
 cputopology.txt
 	- documentation on how CPU topology info is exported via sysfs.
 cris/
diff --git a/Documentation/ABI/testing/debugfs-kmemtrace b/Documentation/ABI/testing/debugfs-kmemtrace
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..5e6a92a
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/ABI/testing/debugfs-kmemtrace
@@ -0,0 +1,71 @@
+What:		/sys/kernel/debug/kmemtrace/
+Date:		July 2008
+Contact:	Eduard - Gabriel Munteanu <eduard.munteanu@linux360.ro>
+Description:
+
+In kmemtrace-enabled kernels, the following files are created:
+
+/sys/kernel/debug/kmemtrace/
+	cpu<n>		(0400)	Per-CPU tracing data, see below. (binary)
+	total_overruns	(0400)	Total number of bytes which were dropped from
+				cpu<n> files because of full buffer condition,
+				non-binary. (text)
+	abi_version	(0400)	Kernel's kmemtrace ABI version. (text)
+
+Each per-CPU file should be read according to the relay interface. That is,
+the reader should set affinity to that specific CPU and, as currently done by
+the userspace application (though there are other methods), use poll() with
+an infinite timeout before every read(). Otherwise, erroneous data may be
+read. The binary data has the following _core_ format:
+
+	Event ID	(1 byte)	Unsigned integer, one of:
+		0 - represents an allocation (KMEMTRACE_EVENT_ALLOC)
+		1 - represents a freeing of previously allocated memory
+		    (KMEMTRACE_EVENT_FREE)
+	Type ID		(1 byte)	Unsigned integer, one of:
+		0 - this is a kmalloc() / kfree()
+		1 - this is a kmem_cache_alloc() / kmem_cache_free()
+		2 - this is a __get_free_pages() et al.
+	Event size	(2 bytes)	Unsigned integer representing the
+					size of this event. Used to extend
+					kmemtrace. Discard the bytes you
+					don't know about.
+	Sequence number	(4 bytes)	Signed integer used to reorder data
+					logged on SMP machines. Wraparound
+					must be taken into account, although
+					it is unlikely.
+	Caller address	(8 bytes)	Return address to the caller.
+	Pointer to mem	(8 bytes)	Pointer to target memory area. Can be
+					NULL, but not all such calls might be
+					recorded.
+
+In case of KMEMTRACE_EVENT_ALLOC events, the next fields follow:
+
+	Requested bytes	(8 bytes)	Total number of requested bytes,
+					unsigned, must not be zero.
+	Allocated bytes (8 bytes)	Total number of actually allocated
+					bytes, unsigned, must not be lower
+					than requested bytes.
+	Requested flags	(4 bytes)	GFP flags supplied by the caller.
+	Target CPU	(4 bytes)	Signed integer, valid for event id 1.
+					If equal to -1, target CPU is the same
+					as origin CPU, but the reverse might
+					not be true.
+
+The data is made available in the same endianness the machine has.
+
+Other event ids and type ids may be defined and added. Other fields may be
+added by increasing event size, but see below for details.
+Every modification to the ABI, including new id definitions, are followed
+by bumping the ABI version by one.
+
+Adding new data to the packet (features) is done at the end of the mandatory
+data:
+	Feature size	(2 byte)
+	Feature ID	(1 byte)
+	Feature data	(Feature size - 3 bytes)
+
+
+Users:
+	kmemtrace-user - git://repo.or.cz/kmemtrace-user.git
+
diff --git a/Documentation/ABI/testing/debugfs-pktcdvd b/Documentation/ABI/testing/debugfs-pktcdvd
index bf9c16b..cf11736 100644
--- a/Documentation/ABI/testing/debugfs-pktcdvd
+++ b/Documentation/ABI/testing/debugfs-pktcdvd
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-What:           /debug/pktcdvd/pktcdvd[0-7]
+What:           /sys/kernel/debug/pktcdvd/pktcdvd[0-7]
 Date:           Oct. 2006
 KernelVersion:  2.6.20
 Contact:        Thomas Maier <balagi@justmail.de>
@@ -10,10 +10,10 @@
 The pktcdvd module (packet writing driver) creates
 these files in debugfs:
 
-/debug/pktcdvd/pktcdvd[0-7]/
+/sys/kernel/debug/pktcdvd/pktcdvd[0-7]/
     info            (0444) Lots of driver statistics and infos.
 
 Example:
 -------
 
-cat /debug/pktcdvd/pktcdvd0/info
+cat /sys/kernel/debug/pktcdvd/pktcdvd0/info
diff --git a/Documentation/ABI/testing/sysfs-class-regulator b/Documentation/ABI/testing/sysfs-class-regulator
index 873ef1f..e091fa8 100644
--- a/Documentation/ABI/testing/sysfs-class-regulator
+++ b/Documentation/ABI/testing/sysfs-class-regulator
@@ -4,8 +4,8 @@
 Contact:	Liam Girdwood <lrg@slimlogic.co.uk>
 Description:
 		Some regulator directories will contain a field called
-		state. This reports the regulator enable status, for
-		regulators which can report that value.
+		state. This reports the regulator enable control, for
+		regulators which can report that input value.
 
 		This will be one of the following strings:
 
@@ -14,16 +14,54 @@
 		'unknown'
 
 		'enabled' means the regulator output is ON and is supplying
-		power to the system.
+		power to the system (assuming no error prevents it).
 
 		'disabled' means the regulator output is OFF and is not
-		supplying power to the system..
+		supplying power to the system (unless some non-Linux
+		control has enabled it).
 
 		'unknown' means software cannot determine the state, or
 		the reported state is invalid.
 
 		NOTE: this field can be used in conjunction with microvolts
-		and microamps to determine regulator output levels.
+		or microamps to determine configured regulator output levels.
+
+
+What:		/sys/class/regulator/.../status
+Description:
+		Some regulator directories will contain a field called
+		"status". This reports the current regulator status, for
+		regulators which can report that output value.
+
+		This will be one of the following strings:
+
+			off
+			on
+			error
+			fast
+			normal
+			idle
+			standby
+
+		"off" means the regulator is not supplying power to the
+		system.
+
+		"on" means the regulator is supplying power to the system,
+		and the regulator can't report a detailed operation mode.
+
+		"error" indicates an out-of-regulation status such as being
+		disabled due to thermal shutdown, or voltage being unstable
+		because of problems with the input power supply.
+
+		"fast", "normal", "idle", and "standby" are all detailed
+		regulator operation modes (described elsewhere).  They
+		imply "on", but provide more detail.
+
+		Note that regulator status is a function of many inputs,
+		not limited to control inputs from Linux.  For example,
+		the actual load presented may trigger "error" status; or
+		a regulator may be enabled by another user, even though
+		Linux did not enable it.
 
 
 What:		/sys/class/regulator/.../type
@@ -58,7 +96,7 @@
 		Some regulator directories will contain a field called
 		microvolts. This holds the regulator output voltage setting
 		measured in microvolts (i.e. E-6 Volts), for regulators
-		which can report that voltage.
+		which can report the control input for voltage.
 
 		NOTE: This value should not be used to determine the regulator
 		output voltage level as this value is the same regardless of
@@ -73,7 +111,7 @@
 		Some regulator directories will contain a field called
 		microamps. This holds the regulator output current limit
 		setting measured in microamps (i.e. E-6 Amps), for regulators
-		which can report that current.
+		which can report the control input for a current limit.
 
 		NOTE: This value should not be used to determine the regulator
 		output current level as this value is the same regardless of
@@ -87,7 +125,7 @@
 Description:
 		Some regulator directories will contain a field called
 		opmode. This holds the current regulator operating mode,
-		for regulators which can report it.
+		for regulators which can report that control input value.
 
 		The opmode value can be one of the following strings:
 
@@ -101,7 +139,8 @@
 
 		NOTE: This value should not be used to determine the regulator
 		output operating mode as this value is the same regardless of
-		whether the regulator is enabled or disabled.
+		whether the regulator is enabled or disabled.  A "status"
+		attribute may be available to determine the actual mode.
 
 
 What:		/sys/class/regulator/.../min_microvolts
diff --git a/Documentation/DMA-mapping.txt b/Documentation/DMA-mapping.txt
index b2a4d6d..01f24e9 100644
--- a/Documentation/DMA-mapping.txt
+++ b/Documentation/DMA-mapping.txt
@@ -136,7 +136,7 @@
 The standard 32-bit addressing PCI device would do something like
 this:
 
-	if (pci_set_dma_mask(pdev, DMA_32BIT_MASK)) {
+	if (pci_set_dma_mask(pdev, DMA_BIT_MASK(32))) {
 		printk(KERN_WARNING
 		       "mydev: No suitable DMA available.\n");
 		goto ignore_this_device;
@@ -155,9 +155,9 @@
 
 	int using_dac;
 
-	if (!pci_set_dma_mask(pdev, DMA_64BIT_MASK)) {
+	if (!pci_set_dma_mask(pdev, DMA_BIT_MASK(64))) {
 		using_dac = 1;
-	} else if (!pci_set_dma_mask(pdev, DMA_32BIT_MASK)) {
+	} else if (!pci_set_dma_mask(pdev, DMA_BIT_MASK(32))) {
 		using_dac = 0;
 	} else {
 		printk(KERN_WARNING
@@ -170,14 +170,14 @@
 
 	int using_dac, consistent_using_dac;
 
-	if (!pci_set_dma_mask(pdev, DMA_64BIT_MASK)) {
+	if (!pci_set_dma_mask(pdev, DMA_BIT_MASK(64))) {
 		using_dac = 1;
 	   	consistent_using_dac = 1;
-		pci_set_consistent_dma_mask(pdev, DMA_64BIT_MASK);
-	} else if (!pci_set_dma_mask(pdev, DMA_32BIT_MASK)) {
+		pci_set_consistent_dma_mask(pdev, DMA_BIT_MASK(64));
+	} else if (!pci_set_dma_mask(pdev, DMA_BIT_MASK(32))) {
 		using_dac = 0;
 		consistent_using_dac = 0;
-		pci_set_consistent_dma_mask(pdev, DMA_32BIT_MASK);
+		pci_set_consistent_dma_mask(pdev, DMA_BIT_MASK(32));
 	} else {
 		printk(KERN_WARNING
 		       "mydev: No suitable DMA available.\n");
@@ -192,7 +192,7 @@
 Finally, if your device can only drive the low 24-bits of
 address during PCI bus mastering you might do something like:
 
-	if (pci_set_dma_mask(pdev, DMA_24BIT_MASK)) {
+	if (pci_set_dma_mask(pdev, DMA_BIT_MASK(24))) {
 		printk(KERN_WARNING
 		       "mydev: 24-bit DMA addressing not available.\n");
 		goto ignore_this_device;
@@ -213,7 +213,7 @@
 
 Here is pseudo-code showing how this might be done:
 
-	#define PLAYBACK_ADDRESS_BITS	DMA_32BIT_MASK
+	#define PLAYBACK_ADDRESS_BITS	DMA_BIT_MASK(32)
 	#define RECORD_ADDRESS_BITS	0x00ffffff
 
 	struct my_sound_card *card;
diff --git a/Documentation/DocBook/Makefile b/Documentation/DocBook/Makefile
index a3a83d3..8918a32 100644
--- a/Documentation/DocBook/Makefile
+++ b/Documentation/DocBook/Makefile
@@ -31,7 +31,7 @@
 
 ###
 # The targets that may be used.
-PHONY += xmldocs sgmldocs psdocs pdfdocs htmldocs mandocs installmandocs
+PHONY += xmldocs sgmldocs psdocs pdfdocs htmldocs mandocs installmandocs cleandocs
 
 BOOKS := $(addprefix $(obj)/,$(DOCBOOKS))
 xmldocs: $(BOOKS)
@@ -213,11 +213,12 @@
 dochelp:
 	@echo  ' Linux kernel internal documentation in different formats:'
 	@echo  '  htmldocs        - HTML'
-	@echo  '  installmandocs  - install man pages generated by mandocs'
-	@echo  '  mandocs         - man pages'
 	@echo  '  pdfdocs         - PDF'
 	@echo  '  psdocs          - Postscript'
 	@echo  '  xmldocs         - XML DocBook'
+	@echo  '  mandocs         - man pages'
+	@echo  '  installmandocs  - install man pages generated by mandocs'
+	@echo  '  cleandocs       - clean all generated DocBook files'
 
 ###
 # Temporary files left by various tools
@@ -235,6 +236,10 @@
 
 clean-dirs := $(patsubst %.xml,%,$(DOCBOOKS)) man
 
+cleandocs:
+	$(Q)rm -f $(call objectify, $(clean-files))
+	$(Q)rm -rf $(call objectify, $(clean-dirs))
+
 # Declare the contents of the .PHONY variable as phony.  We keep that
 # information in a variable se we can use it in if_changed and friends.
 
diff --git a/Documentation/DocBook/kernel-api.tmpl b/Documentation/DocBook/kernel-api.tmpl
index 58c1945..d6ac5d6 100644
--- a/Documentation/DocBook/kernel-api.tmpl
+++ b/Documentation/DocBook/kernel-api.tmpl
@@ -259,7 +259,7 @@
 !Eblock/blk-tag.c
 !Iblock/blk-tag.c
 !Eblock/blk-integrity.c
-!Iblock/blktrace.c
+!Ikernel/trace/blktrace.c
 !Iblock/genhd.c
 !Eblock/genhd.c
   </chapter>
diff --git a/Documentation/DocBook/writing-an-alsa-driver.tmpl b/Documentation/DocBook/writing-an-alsa-driver.tmpl
index 46b08fe..7a2e0e9 100644
--- a/Documentation/DocBook/writing-an-alsa-driver.tmpl
+++ b/Documentation/DocBook/writing-an-alsa-driver.tmpl
@@ -1137,8 +1137,8 @@
           if (err < 0)
                   return err;
           /* check PCI availability (28bit DMA) */
-          if (pci_set_dma_mask(pci, DMA_28BIT_MASK) < 0 ||
-              pci_set_consistent_dma_mask(pci, DMA_28BIT_MASK) < 0) {
+          if (pci_set_dma_mask(pci, DMA_BIT_MASK(28)) < 0 ||
+              pci_set_consistent_dma_mask(pci, DMA_BIT_MASK(28)) < 0) {
                   printk(KERN_ERR "error to set 28bit mask DMA\n");
                   pci_disable_device(pci);
                   return -ENXIO;
@@ -1252,8 +1252,8 @@
   err = pci_enable_device(pci);
   if (err < 0)
           return err;
-  if (pci_set_dma_mask(pci, DMA_28BIT_MASK) < 0 ||
-      pci_set_consistent_dma_mask(pci, DMA_28BIT_MASK) < 0) {
+  if (pci_set_dma_mask(pci, DMA_BIT_MASK(28)) < 0 ||
+      pci_set_consistent_dma_mask(pci, DMA_BIT_MASK(28)) < 0) {
           printk(KERN_ERR "error to set 28bit mask DMA\n");
           pci_disable_device(pci);
           return -ENXIO;
diff --git a/Documentation/RCU/listRCU.txt b/Documentation/RCU/listRCU.txt
index 1fd1753..4349c14 100644
--- a/Documentation/RCU/listRCU.txt
+++ b/Documentation/RCU/listRCU.txt
@@ -118,7 +118,7 @@
 		list_for_each_entry(e, list, list) {
 			if (!audit_compare_rule(rule, &e->rule)) {
 				list_del_rcu(&e->list);
-				call_rcu(&e->rcu, audit_free_rule, e);
+				call_rcu(&e->rcu, audit_free_rule);
 				return 0;
 			}
 		}
@@ -206,7 +206,7 @@
 				ne->rule.action = newaction;
 				ne->rule.file_count = newfield_count;
 				list_replace_rcu(e, ne);
-				call_rcu(&e->rcu, audit_free_rule, e);
+				call_rcu(&e->rcu, audit_free_rule);
 				return 0;
 			}
 		}
@@ -283,7 +283,7 @@
 				list_del_rcu(&e->list);
 				e->deleted = 1;
 				spin_unlock(&e->lock);
-				call_rcu(&e->rcu, audit_free_rule, e);
+				call_rcu(&e->rcu, audit_free_rule);
 				return 0;
 			}
 		}
diff --git a/Documentation/RCU/rcu.txt b/Documentation/RCU/rcu.txt
index 95821a2..7aa2002 100644
--- a/Documentation/RCU/rcu.txt
+++ b/Documentation/RCU/rcu.txt
@@ -81,7 +81,7 @@
 	This work is largely completed.  Realtime-friendly RCU can be
 	enabled via the CONFIG_PREEMPT_RCU kernel configuration parameter.
 	However, work is in progress for enabling priority boosting of
-	preempted RCU read-side critical sections.This is needed if you
+	preempted RCU read-side critical sections.  This is needed if you
 	have CPU-bound realtime threads.
 
 o	Where can I find more information on RCU?
diff --git a/Documentation/RCU/rculist_nulls.txt b/Documentation/RCU/rculist_nulls.txt
index 239f542..6389dec 100644
--- a/Documentation/RCU/rculist_nulls.txt
+++ b/Documentation/RCU/rculist_nulls.txt
@@ -21,7 +21,7 @@
   /*
    * Because a writer could delete object, and a writer could
    * reuse these object before the RCU grace period, we
-   * must check key after geting the reference on object
+   * must check key after getting the reference on object
    */
   if (obj->key != key) { // not the object we expected
      put_ref(obj);
@@ -117,7 +117,7 @@
 to another chain) checking the final 'nulls' value if
 the lookup met the end of chain. If final 'nulls' value
 is not the slot number, then we must restart the lookup at
-the begining. If the object was moved to same chain,
+the beginning. If the object was moved to the same chain,
 then the reader doesnt care : It might eventually
 scan the list again without harm.
 
diff --git a/Documentation/blockdev/00-INDEX b/Documentation/blockdev/00-INDEX
index 86f054c..c08df56 100644
--- a/Documentation/blockdev/00-INDEX
+++ b/Documentation/blockdev/00-INDEX
@@ -8,6 +8,8 @@
 	- info on using Compaq's SMART2 Intelligent Disk Array Controllers.
 floppy.txt
 	- notes and driver options for the floppy disk driver.
+mflash.txt
+	- info on mGine m(g)flash driver for linux.
 nbd.txt
 	- info on a TCP implementation of a network block device.
 paride.txt
diff --git a/Documentation/blockdev/mflash.txt b/Documentation/blockdev/mflash.txt
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..1f610ec
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/blockdev/mflash.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,84 @@
+This document describes m[g]flash support in linux.
+
+Contents
+  1. Overview
+  2. Reserved area configuration
+  3. Example of mflash platform driver registration
+
+1. Overview
+
+Mflash and gflash are embedded flash drive. The only difference is mflash is
+MCP(Multi Chip Package) device. These two device operate exactly same way.
+So the rest mflash repersents mflash and gflash altogether.
+
+Internally, mflash has nand flash and other hardware logics and supports
+2 different operation (ATA, IO) modes. ATA mode doesn't need any new
+driver and currently works well under standard IDE subsystem. Actually it's
+one chip SSD. IO mode is ATA-like custom mode for the host that doesn't have
+IDE interface.
+
+Followings are brief descriptions about IO mode.
+A. IO mode based on ATA protocol and uses some custom command. (read confirm,
+write confirm)
+B. IO mode uses SRAM bus interface.
+C. IO mode supports 4kB boot area, so host can boot from mflash.
+
+2. Reserved area configuration
+If host boot from mflash, usually needs raw area for boot loader image. All of
+the mflash's block device operation will be taken this value as start offset.
+Note that boot loader's size of reserved area and kernel configuration value
+must be same.
+
+3. Example of mflash platform driver registration
+Working mflash is very straight forward. Adding platform device stuff to board
+configuration file is all. Here is some pseudo example.
+
+static struct mg_drv_data mflash_drv_data = {
+	/* If you want to polling driver set to 1 */
+	.use_polling = 0,
+	/* device attribution */
+	.dev_attr = MG_BOOT_DEV
+};
+
+static struct resource mg_mflash_rsc[] = {
+	/* Base address of mflash */
+	[0] = {
+		.start = 0x08000000,
+		.end = 0x08000000 + SZ_64K - 1,
+		.flags = IORESOURCE_MEM
+	},
+	/* mflash interrupt pin */
+	[1] = {
+		.start = IRQ_GPIO(84),
+		.end = IRQ_GPIO(84),
+		.flags = IORESOURCE_IRQ
+	},
+	/* mflash reset pin */
+	[2] = {
+		.start = 43,
+		.end = 43,
+		.name = MG_RST_PIN,
+		.flags = IORESOURCE_IO
+	},
+	/* mflash reset-out pin
+	 * If you use mflash as storage device (i.e. other than MG_BOOT_DEV),
+	 * should assign this */
+	[3] = {
+		.start = 51,
+		.end = 51,
+		.name = MG_RSTOUT_PIN,
+		.flags = IORESOURCE_IO
+	}
+};
+
+static struct platform_device mflash_dev = {
+	.name = MG_DEV_NAME,
+	.id = -1,
+	.dev = {
+		.platform_data = &mflash_drv_data,
+	},
+	.num_resources = ARRAY_SIZE(mg_mflash_rsc),
+	.resource = mg_mflash_rsc
+};
+
+platform_device_register(&mflash_dev);
diff --git a/Documentation/cgroups/00-INDEX b/Documentation/cgroups/00-INDEX
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..3f58fa3
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/cgroups/00-INDEX
@@ -0,0 +1,18 @@
+00-INDEX
+	- this file
+cgroups.txt
+	- Control Groups definition, implementation details, examples and API.
+cpuacct.txt
+	- CPU Accounting Controller; account CPU usage for groups of tasks.
+cpusets.txt
+	- documents the cpusets feature; assign CPUs and Mem to a set of tasks.
+devices.txt
+	- Device Whitelist Controller; description, interface and security.
+freezer-subsystem.txt
+	- checkpointing; rationale to not use signals, interface.
+memcg_test.txt
+	- Memory Resource Controller; implementation details.
+memory.txt
+	- Memory Resource Controller; design, accounting, interface, testing.
+resource_counter.txt
+	- Resource Counter API.
diff --git a/Documentation/cgroups/cgroups.txt b/Documentation/cgroups/cgroups.txt
index 4ea8523..6eb1a97 100644
--- a/Documentation/cgroups/cgroups.txt
+++ b/Documentation/cgroups/cgroups.txt
@@ -56,7 +56,7 @@
 state attached to each cgroup in the hierarchy.  Each hierarchy has
 an instance of the cgroup virtual filesystem associated with it.
 
-At any one time there may be multiple active hierachies of task
+At any one time there may be multiple active hierarchies of task
 cgroups. Each hierarchy is a partition of all tasks in the system.
 
 User level code may create and destroy cgroups by name in an
@@ -124,10 +124,10 @@
                                / \
                        Prof (15%) students (5%)
 
-Browsers like firefox/lynx go into the WWW network class, while (k)nfsd go
+Browsers like Firefox/Lynx go into the WWW network class, while (k)nfsd go
 into NFS network class.
 
-At the same time firefox/lynx will share an appropriate CPU/Memory class
+At the same time Firefox/Lynx will share an appropriate CPU/Memory class
 depending on who launched it (prof/student).
 
 With the ability to classify tasks differently for different resources
@@ -325,7 +325,7 @@
 Creating, modifying, using the cgroups can be done through the cgroup
 virtual filesystem.
 
-To mount a cgroup hierarchy will all available subsystems, type:
+To mount a cgroup hierarchy with all available subsystems, type:
 # mount -t cgroup xxx /dev/cgroup
 
 The "xxx" is not interpreted by the cgroup code, but will appear in
@@ -539,7 +539,7 @@
 void post_clone(struct cgroup_subsys *ss, struct cgroup *cgrp)
 (cgroup_mutex held by caller)
 
-Called at the end of cgroup_clone() to do any paramater
+Called at the end of cgroup_clone() to do any parameter
 initialization which might be required before a task could attach.  For
 example in cpusets, no task may attach before 'cpus' and 'mems' are set
 up.
diff --git a/Documentation/cgroups/cpuacct.txt b/Documentation/cgroups/cpuacct.txt
index bb775fb..8b93094 100644
--- a/Documentation/cgroups/cpuacct.txt
+++ b/Documentation/cgroups/cpuacct.txt
@@ -30,3 +30,21 @@
 process (bash) into it. CPU time consumed by this bash and its children
 can be obtained from g1/cpuacct.usage and the same is accumulated in
 /cgroups/cpuacct.usage also.
+
+cpuacct.stat file lists a few statistics which further divide the
+CPU time obtained by the cgroup into user and system times. Currently
+the following statistics are supported:
+
+user: Time spent by tasks of the cgroup in user mode.
+system: Time spent by tasks of the cgroup in kernel mode.
+
+user and system are in USER_HZ unit.
+
+cpuacct controller uses percpu_counter interface to collect user and
+system times. This has two side effects:
+
+- It is theoretically possible to see wrong values for user and system times.
+  This is because percpu_counter_read() on 32bit systems isn't safe
+  against concurrent writes.
+- It is possible to see slightly outdated values for user and system times
+  due to the batch processing nature of percpu_counter.
diff --git a/Documentation/cgroups/cpusets.txt b/Documentation/cgroups/cpusets.txt
index 0611e95..f9ca389 100644
--- a/Documentation/cgroups/cpusets.txt
+++ b/Documentation/cgroups/cpusets.txt
@@ -131,7 +131,7 @@
  - The hierarchy of cpusets can be mounted at /dev/cpuset, for
    browsing and manipulation from user space.
  - A cpuset may be marked exclusive, which ensures that no other
-   cpuset (except direct ancestors and descendents) may contain
+   cpuset (except direct ancestors and descendants) may contain
    any overlapping CPUs or Memory Nodes.
  - You can list all the tasks (by pid) attached to any cpuset.
 
@@ -226,7 +226,7 @@
 --------------------------------
 
 If a cpuset is cpu or mem exclusive, no other cpuset, other than
-a direct ancestor or descendent, may share any of the same CPUs or
+a direct ancestor or descendant, may share any of the same CPUs or
 Memory Nodes.
 
 A cpuset that is mem_exclusive *or* mem_hardwall is "hardwalled",
@@ -427,7 +427,7 @@
 When doing this, you don't usually want to leave any unpinned tasks in
 the top cpuset that might use non-trivial amounts of CPU, as such tasks
 may be artificially constrained to some subset of CPUs, depending on
-the particulars of this flag setting in descendent cpusets.  Even if
+the particulars of this flag setting in descendant cpusets.  Even if
 such a task could use spare CPU cycles in some other CPUs, the kernel
 scheduler might not consider the possibility of load balancing that
 task to that underused CPU.
@@ -531,9 +531,9 @@
 
 Of course it takes some searching cost to find movable tasks and/or
 idle CPUs, the scheduler might not search all CPUs in the domain
-everytime.  In fact, in some architectures, the searching ranges on
+every time.  In fact, in some architectures, the searching ranges on
 events are limited in the same socket or node where the CPU locates,
-while the load balance on tick searchs all.
+while the load balance on tick searches all.
 
 For example, assume CPU Z is relatively far from CPU X.  Even if CPU Z
 is idle while CPU X and the siblings are busy, scheduler can't migrate
@@ -601,7 +601,7 @@
 of MPOL_BIND nodes are still allowed in the new cpuset.  If the task
 was using MPOL_BIND and now none of its MPOL_BIND nodes are allowed
 in the new cpuset, then the task will be essentially treated as if it
-was MPOL_BIND bound to the new cpuset (even though its numa placement,
+was MPOL_BIND bound to the new cpuset (even though its NUMA placement,
 as queried by get_mempolicy(), doesn't change).  If a task is moved
 from one cpuset to another, then the kernel will adjust the tasks
 memory placement, as above, the next time that the kernel attempts
diff --git a/Documentation/cgroups/devices.txt b/Documentation/cgroups/devices.txt
index 7cc6e6a..57ca4c8 100644
--- a/Documentation/cgroups/devices.txt
+++ b/Documentation/cgroups/devices.txt
@@ -42,7 +42,7 @@
 movement as people get some experience with this.  We may just want
 to require CAP_SYS_ADMIN, which at least is a separate bit from
 CAP_MKNOD.  We may want to just refuse moving to a cgroup which
-isn't a descendent of the current one.  Or we may want to use
+isn't a descendant of the current one.  Or we may want to use
 CAP_MAC_ADMIN, since we really are trying to lock down root.
 
 CAP_SYS_ADMIN is needed to modify the whitelist or move another
diff --git a/Documentation/cgroups/memcg_test.txt b/Documentation/cgroups/memcg_test.txt
index 8a11caf..72db89e 100644
--- a/Documentation/cgroups/memcg_test.txt
+++ b/Documentation/cgroups/memcg_test.txt
@@ -356,7 +356,7 @@
 	(Shell-B)
 	# move all tasks in /cgroup/test to /cgroup
 	# /sbin/swapoff -a
-	# rmdir /test/cgroup
+	# rmdir /cgroup/test
 	# kill malloc task.
 
 	Of course, tmpfs v.s. swapoff test should be tested, too.
diff --git a/Documentation/cgroups/memory.txt b/Documentation/cgroups/memory.txt
index e150196..1a60887 100644
--- a/Documentation/cgroups/memory.txt
+++ b/Documentation/cgroups/memory.txt
@@ -6,15 +6,14 @@
 
 Salient features
 
-a. Enable control of both RSS (mapped) and Page Cache (unmapped) pages
+a. Enable control of Anonymous, Page Cache (mapped and unmapped) and
+   Swap Cache memory pages.
 b. The infrastructure allows easy addition of other types of memory to control
 c. Provides *zero overhead* for non memory controller users
 d. Provides a double LRU: global memory pressure causes reclaim from the
    global LRU; a cgroup on hitting a limit, reclaims from the per
    cgroup LRU
 
-NOTE: Swap Cache (unmapped) is not accounted now.
-
 Benefits and Purpose of the memory controller
 
 The memory controller isolates the memory behaviour of a group of tasks
@@ -290,34 +289,44 @@
   moved to the parent. If you want to avoid that, force_empty will be useful.
 
 5.2 stat file
-  memory.stat file includes following statistics (now)
-	cache			- # of pages from page-cache and shmem.
-	rss			- # of pages from anonymous memory.
-	pgpgin			- # of event of charging
-	pgpgout			- # of event of uncharging
-	active_anon		- # of pages on active lru of anon, shmem.
-	inactive_anon 		- # of pages on active lru of anon, shmem
-	active_file		- # of pages on active lru of file-cache
-	inactive_file		- # of pages on inactive lru of file cache
-	unevictable		- # of pages cannot be reclaimed.(mlocked etc)
 
-	Below is depend on CONFIG_DEBUG_VM.
-	inactive_ratio		- VM inernal parameter. (see mm/page_alloc.c)
-	recent_rotated_anon	- VM internal parameter. (see mm/vmscan.c)
-	recent_rotated_file	- VM internal parameter. (see mm/vmscan.c)
-	recent_scanned_anon 	- VM internal parameter. (see mm/vmscan.c)
-	recent_scanned_file 	- VM internal parameter. (see mm/vmscan.c)
+memory.stat file includes following statistics
 
-  Memo:
+cache		- # of bytes of page cache memory.
+rss		- # of bytes of anonymous and swap cache memory.
+pgpgin		- # of pages paged in (equivalent to # of charging events).
+pgpgout		- # of pages paged out (equivalent to # of uncharging events).
+active_anon	- # of bytes of anonymous and  swap cache memory on active
+		  lru list.
+inactive_anon	- # of bytes of anonymous memory and swap cache memory on
+		  inactive lru list.
+active_file	- # of bytes of file-backed memory on active lru list.
+inactive_file	- # of bytes of file-backed memory on inactive lru list.
+unevictable	- # of bytes of memory that cannot be reclaimed (mlocked etc).
+
+The following additional stats are dependent on CONFIG_DEBUG_VM.
+
+inactive_ratio		- VM internal parameter. (see mm/page_alloc.c)
+recent_rotated_anon	- VM internal parameter. (see mm/vmscan.c)
+recent_rotated_file	- VM internal parameter. (see mm/vmscan.c)
+recent_scanned_anon	- VM internal parameter. (see mm/vmscan.c)
+recent_scanned_file	- VM internal parameter. (see mm/vmscan.c)
+
+Memo:
 	recent_rotated means recent frequency of lru rotation.
 	recent_scanned means recent # of scans to lru.
 	showing for better debug please see the code for meanings.
 
+Note:
+	Only anonymous and swap cache memory is listed as part of 'rss' stat.
+	This should not be confused with the true 'resident set size' or the
+	amount of physical memory used by the cgroup. Per-cgroup rss
+	accounting is not done yet.
 
 5.3 swappiness
   Similar to /proc/sys/vm/swappiness, but affecting a hierarchy of groups only.
 
-  Following cgroup's swapiness can't be changed.
+  Following cgroups' swapiness can't be changed.
   - root cgroup (uses /proc/sys/vm/swappiness).
   - a cgroup which uses hierarchy and it has child cgroup.
   - a cgroup which uses hierarchy and not the root of hierarchy.
diff --git a/Documentation/cgroups/resource_counter.txt b/Documentation/cgroups/resource_counter.txt
index f196ac1..95b24d7 100644
--- a/Documentation/cgroups/resource_counter.txt
+++ b/Documentation/cgroups/resource_counter.txt
@@ -47,13 +47,18 @@
 
 2. Basic accounting routines
 
- a. void res_counter_init(struct res_counter *rc)
+ a. void res_counter_init(struct res_counter *rc,
+				struct res_counter *rc_parent)
 
  	Initializes the resource counter. As usual, should be the first
 	routine called for a new counter.
 
- b. int res_counter_charge[_locked]
-			(struct res_counter *rc, unsigned long val)
+	The struct res_counter *parent can be used to define a hierarchical
+	child -> parent relationship directly in the res_counter structure,
+	NULL can be used to define no relationship.
+
+ c. int res_counter_charge(struct res_counter *rc, unsigned long val,
+				struct res_counter **limit_fail_at)
 
 	When a resource is about to be allocated it has to be accounted
 	with the appropriate resource counter (controller should determine
@@ -67,15 +72,25 @@
 	  * if the charging is performed first, then it should be uncharged
 	    on error path (if the one is called).
 
- c. void res_counter_uncharge[_locked]
+	If the charging fails and a hierarchical dependency exists, the
+	limit_fail_at parameter is set to the particular res_counter element
+	where the charging failed.
+
+ d. int res_counter_charge_locked
+			(struct res_counter *rc, unsigned long val)
+
+	The same as res_counter_charge(), but it must not acquire/release the
+	res_counter->lock internally (it must be called with res_counter->lock
+	held).
+
+ e. void res_counter_uncharge[_locked]
 			(struct res_counter *rc, unsigned long val)
 
 	When a resource is released (freed) it should be de-accounted
 	from the resource counter it was accounted to.  This is called
 	"uncharging".
 
-    The _locked routines imply that the res_counter->lock is taken.
-
+	The _locked routines imply that the res_counter->lock is taken.
 
  2.1 Other accounting routines
 
diff --git a/Documentation/devices.txt b/Documentation/devices.txt
index 62254d4..53d64d3 100644
--- a/Documentation/devices.txt
+++ b/Documentation/devices.txt
@@ -1,9 +1,9 @@
 
 		    LINUX ALLOCATED DEVICES (2.6+ version)
 
-	     Maintained by Torben Mathiasen <device@lanana.org>
+	     Maintained by Alan Cox <device@lanana.org>
 
-		      Last revised: 29 November 2006
+		      Last revised: 6th April 2009
 
 This list is the Linux Device List, the official registry of allocated
 device numbers and /dev directory nodes for the Linux operating
@@ -67,6 +67,11 @@
 in "batch mode", so there is likely additional registrations that
 haven't been listed yet.
 
+Fourth, remember that Linux now has extensive support for dynamic allocation
+of device numbering and can use sysfs and udev to handle the naming needs.
+There are still some exceptions in the serial and boot device area. Before
+asking for a device number make sure you actually need one.
+
 Finally, sometimes I have to play "namespace police."  Please don't be
 offended.  I often get submissions for /dev names that would be bound
 to cause conflicts down the road.  I am trying to avoid getting in a
@@ -101,7 +106,7 @@
 		  0 = /dev/ram0		First RAM disk
 		  1 = /dev/ram1		Second RAM disk
 		    ...
-		250 = /dev/initrd	Initial RAM disk {2.6}
+		250 = /dev/initrd	Initial RAM disk
 
 		Older kernels had /dev/ramdisk (1, 1) here.
 		/dev/initrd refers to a RAM disk which was preloaded
@@ -340,7 +345,7 @@
 		 14 = /dev/touchscreen/ucb1x00  UCB 1x00 touchscreen
 		 15 = /dev/touchscreen/mk712	MK712 touchscreen
 		128 = /dev/beep		Fancy beep device
-		129 = /dev/modreq	Kernel module load request {2.6}
+		129 =
 		130 = /dev/watchdog	Watchdog timer port
 		131 = /dev/temperature	Machine internal temperature
 		132 = /dev/hwtrap	Hardware fault trap
@@ -350,10 +355,10 @@
 		139 = /dev/openprom	SPARC OpenBoot PROM
 		140 = /dev/relay8	Berkshire Products Octal relay card
 		141 = /dev/relay16	Berkshire Products ISO-16 relay card
-		142 = /dev/msr		x86 model-specific registers {2.6}
+		142 =
 		143 = /dev/pciconf	PCI configuration space
 		144 = /dev/nvram	Non-volatile configuration RAM
-		145 = /dev/hfmodem	Soundcard shortwave modem control {2.6}
+		145 = /dev/hfmodem	Soundcard shortwave modem control
 		146 = /dev/graphics	Linux/SGI graphics device
 		147 = /dev/opengl	Linux/SGI OpenGL pipe
 		148 = /dev/gfx		Linux/SGI graphics effects device
@@ -435,6 +440,9 @@
 		228 = /dev/hpet		HPET driver
 		229 = /dev/fuse		Fuse (virtual filesystem in user-space)
 		230 = /dev/midishare	MidiShare driver
+		231 = /dev/snapshot	System memory snapshot device
+		232 = /dev/kvm		Kernel-based virtual machine (hardware virtualization extensions)
+		233 = /dev/kmview	View-OS A process with a view
 		240-254			Reserved for local use
 		255			Reserved for MISC_DYNAMIC_MINOR
 
@@ -466,10 +474,7 @@
 		The device names specified are proposed -- if there
 		are "standard" names for these devices, please let me know.
 
- 12 block	MSCDEX CD-ROM callback support {2.6}
-		  0 = /dev/dos_cd0	First MSCDEX CD-ROM
-		  1 = /dev/dos_cd1	Second MSCDEX CD-ROM
-		    ...
+ 12 block
 
  13 char	Input core
 		  0 = /dev/input/js0	First joystick
@@ -498,7 +503,7 @@
 		  2 = /dev/midi00	First MIDI port
 		  3 = /dev/dsp		Digital audio
 		  4 = /dev/audio	Sun-compatible digital audio
-		  6 = /dev/sndstat	Sound card status information {2.6}
+		  6 =
 		  7 = /dev/audioctl	SPARC audio control device
 		  8 = /dev/sequencer2	Sequencer -- alternate device
 		 16 = /dev/mixer1	Second soundcard mixer control
@@ -510,14 +515,7 @@
 		 34 = /dev/midi02	Third MIDI port
 		 50 = /dev/midi03	Fourth MIDI port
 
- 14 block	BIOS harddrive callback support {2.6}
-		  0 = /dev/dos_hda	First BIOS harddrive whole disk
-		 64 = /dev/dos_hdb	Second BIOS harddrive whole disk
-		128 = /dev/dos_hdc	Third BIOS harddrive whole disk
-		192 = /dev/dos_hdd	Fourth BIOS harddrive whole disk
-
-		Partitions are handled in the same way as IDE disks
-		(see major number 3).
+ 14 block
 
  15 char	Joystick
 		  0 = /dev/js0		First analog joystick
@@ -535,14 +533,14 @@
  16 block	GoldStar CD-ROM
 		  0 = /dev/gscd		GoldStar CD-ROM
 
- 17 char	Chase serial card
+ 17 char	OBSOLETE (was Chase serial card)
 		  0 = /dev/ttyH0	First Chase port
 		  1 = /dev/ttyH1	Second Chase port
 		    ...
  17 block	Optics Storage CD-ROM
 		  0 = /dev/optcd	Optics Storage CD-ROM
 
- 18 char	Chase serial card - alternate devices
+ 18 char	OBSOLETE (was Chase serial card - alternate devices)
 		  0 = /dev/cuh0		Callout device for ttyH0
 		  1 = /dev/cuh1		Callout device for ttyH1
 		    ...
@@ -644,8 +642,7 @@
 		  2 = /dev/sbpcd2	Panasonic CD-ROM controller 0 unit 2
 		  3 = /dev/sbpcd3	Panasonic CD-ROM controller 0 unit 3
 
- 26 char	Quanta WinVision frame grabber {2.6}
-		  0 = /dev/wvisfgrab	Quanta WinVision frame grabber
+ 26 char
 
  26 block	Second Matsushita (Panasonic/SoundBlaster) CD-ROM
 		  0 = /dev/sbpcd4	Panasonic CD-ROM controller 1 unit 0
@@ -872,7 +869,7 @@
 		and "user level packet I/O."  This board is also
 		accessible as a standard networking "eth" device.
 
- 38 block	Reserved for Linux/AP+
+ 38 block	OBSOLETE (was Linux/AP+)
 
  39 char	ML-16P experimental I/O board
 		  0 = /dev/ml16pa-a0	First card, first analog channel
@@ -892,29 +889,16 @@
 		 50 = /dev/ml16pb-c1	Second card, second counter/timer
 		 51 = /dev/ml16pb-c2	Second card, third counter/timer
 		      ...
- 39 block	Reserved for Linux/AP+
+ 39 block
 
- 40 char	Matrox Meteor frame grabber {2.6}
-		  0 = /dev/mmetfgrab	Matrox Meteor frame grabber
+ 40 char
 
- 40 block	Syquest EZ135 parallel port removable drive
-		  0 = /dev/eza		Parallel EZ135 drive, whole disk
-
-		This device is obsolete and will be removed in a
-		future version of Linux.  It has been replaced with
-		the parallel port IDE disk driver at major number 45.
-		Partitions are handled in the same way as IDE disks
-		(see major number 3).
+ 40 block
 
  41 char	Yet Another Micro Monitor
 		  0 = /dev/yamm		Yet Another Micro Monitor
 
- 41 block	MicroSolutions BackPack parallel port CD-ROM
-		  0 = /dev/bpcd		BackPack CD-ROM
-
-		This device is obsolete and will be removed in a
-		future version of Linux.  It has been replaced with
-		the parallel port ATAPI CD-ROM driver at major number 46.
+ 41 block
 
  42 char	Demo/sample use
 
@@ -1681,13 +1665,7 @@
 		disks (see major number 3) except that the limit on
 		partitions is 15.
 
- 93 char	IBM Smart Capture Card frame grabber {2.6}
-		  0 = /dev/iscc0	First Smart Capture Card
-		  1 = /dev/iscc1	Second Smart Capture Card
-		    ...
-		128 = /dev/isccctl0	First Smart Capture Card control
-		129 = /dev/isccctl1	Second Smart Capture Card control
-		    ...
+ 93 char
 
  93 block	NAND Flash Translation Layer filesystem
 		  0 = /dev/nftla	First NFTL layer
@@ -1695,10 +1673,7 @@
 		    ...
 		240 = /dev/nftlp	16th NTFL layer
 
- 94 char	miroVIDEO DC10/30 capture/playback device {2.6}
-		  0 = /dev/dcxx0	First capture card
-		  1 = /dev/dcxx1	Second capture card
-		    ...
+ 94 char
 
  94 block	IBM S/390 DASD block storage
     		  0 = /dev/dasda First DASD device, major
@@ -1791,11 +1766,7 @@
 		    ...
 		 15 = /dev/amiraid/ar?p15 15th partition
 
-102 char	Philips SAA5249 Teletext signal decoder {2.6}
-		  0 = /dev/tlk0		First Teletext decoder
-		  1 = /dev/tlk1		Second Teletext decoder
-		  2 = /dev/tlk2		Third Teletext decoder
-		  3 = /dev/tlk3		Fourth Teletext decoder
+102 char
 
 102 block	Compressed block device
 		  0 = /dev/cbd/a	First compressed block device, whole device
@@ -1916,10 +1887,7 @@
 		DAC960 (see major number 48) except that the limit on
 		partitions is 15.
 
-111 char	Philips SAA7146-based audio/video card {2.6}
-		  0 = /dev/av0		First A/V card
-		  1 = /dev/av1		Second A/V card
-		    ...
+111 char
 
 111 block	Compaq Next Generation Drive Array, eighth controller
 		  0 = /dev/cciss/c7d0	First logical drive, whole disk
@@ -2079,8 +2047,8 @@
 		    ...
 
 119 char	VMware virtual network control
-		  0 = /dev/vmnet0	1st virtual network
-		  1 = /dev/vmnet1	2nd virtual network
+		  0 = /dev/vnet0	1st virtual network
+		  1 = /dev/vnet1	2nd virtual network
 		    ...
 
 120-127 char	LOCAL/EXPERIMENTAL USE
@@ -2450,7 +2418,7 @@
 		  2 = /dev/raw/raw2	Second raw I/O device
 		    ...
 
-163 char	UNASSIGNED (was Radio Tech BIM-XXX-RS232 radio modem - see 51)
+163 char
 
 164 char	Chase Research AT/PCI-Fast serial card
 		  0 = /dev/ttyCH0	AT/PCI-Fast board 0, port 0
@@ -2542,6 +2510,12 @@
 		  1 = /dev/clanvi1	Second cLAN adapter
 		    ...
 
+179 block       MMC block devices
+		  0 = /dev/mmcblk0      First SD/MMC card
+		  1 = /dev/mmcblk0p1    First partition on first MMC card
+		  8 = /dev/mmcblk1      Second SD/MMC card
+		    ...
+
 179 char	CCube DVXChip-based PCI products
 		  0 = /dev/dvxirq0	First DVX device
 		  1 = /dev/dvxirq1	Second DVX device
@@ -2560,6 +2534,9 @@
 		 96 = /dev/usb/hiddev0	1st USB HID device
 		    ...
 		111 = /dev/usb/hiddev15	16th USB HID device
+		112 = /dev/usb/auer0	1st auerswald ISDN device
+		    ...
+		127 = /dev/usb/auer15	16th auerswald ISDN device
 		128 = /dev/usb/brlvgr0	First Braille Voyager device
 		    ...
 		131 = /dev/usb/brlvgr3	Fourth Braille Voyager device
@@ -2810,6 +2787,20 @@
 		    ...
 		 190 = /dev/ttyUL3		Xilinx uartlite - port 3
 		 191 = /dev/xvc0		Xen virtual console - port 0
+		 192 = /dev/ttyPZ0		pmac_zilog - port 0
+		    ...
+		 195 = /dev/ttyPZ3		pmac_zilog - port 3
+		 196 = /dev/ttyTX0		TX39/49 serial port 0
+		    ...
+		 204 = /dev/ttyTX7		TX39/49 serial port 7
+		 205 = /dev/ttySC0		SC26xx serial port 0
+		 206 = /dev/ttySC1		SC26xx serial port 1
+		 207 = /dev/ttySC2		SC26xx serial port 2
+		 208 = /dev/ttySC3		SC26xx serial port 3
+		 209 = /dev/ttyMAX0		MAX3100 serial port 0
+		 210 = /dev/ttyMAX1		MAX3100 serial port 1
+		 211 = /dev/ttyMAX2		MAX3100 serial port 2
+		 212 = /dev/ttyMAX3		MAX3100 serial port 3
 
 205 char	Low-density serial ports (alternate device)
 		  0 = /dev/culu0		Callout device for ttyLU0
@@ -3145,6 +3136,14 @@
 		  1 = /dev/blockrom1	Second ROM card's translation layer interface
 		  ...
 
+259 block	Block Extended Major
+		  Used dynamically to hold additional partition minor
+		  numbers and allow large numbers of partitions per device
+
+259 char	FPGA configuration interfaces
+		  0 = /dev/icap0	First Xilinx internal configuration
+		  1 = /dev/icap1	Second Xilinx internal configuration
+
 260 char	OSD (Object-based-device) SCSI Device
 		  0 = /dev/osd0		First OSD Device
 		  1 = /dev/osd1		Second OSD Device
diff --git a/Documentation/fb/uvesafb.txt b/Documentation/fb/uvesafb.txt
index 7ac3c40..eefdd91 100644
--- a/Documentation/fb/uvesafb.txt
+++ b/Documentation/fb/uvesafb.txt
@@ -59,7 +59,8 @@
 ypan    Enable display panning using the VESA protected mode
         interface.  The visible screen is just a window of the
         video memory, console scrolling is done by changing the
-        start of the window.  Available on x86 only.
+        start of the window.  This option is available on x86
+        only and is the default option on that architecture.
 
 ywrap   Same as ypan, but assumes your gfx board can wrap-around
         the video memory (i.e. starts reading from top if it
@@ -67,7 +68,7 @@
         Available on x86 only.
 
 redraw  Scroll by redrawing the affected part of the screen, this
-        is the safe (and slow) default.
+        is the default on non-x86.
 
 (If you're using uvesafb as a module, the above three options are
  used a parameter of the scroll option, e.g. scroll=ypan.)
@@ -182,7 +183,7 @@
 
 --
  Michal Januszewski <spock@gentoo.org>
- Last updated: 2007-06-16
+ Last updated: 2009-03-30
 
  Documentation of the uvesafb options is loosely based on vesafb.txt.
 
diff --git a/Documentation/feature-removal-schedule.txt b/Documentation/feature-removal-schedule.txt
index a23361e..de491a3 100644
--- a/Documentation/feature-removal-schedule.txt
+++ b/Documentation/feature-removal-schedule.txt
@@ -283,13 +283,6 @@
 
 ---------------------------
 
-What:	remove HID compat support
-When:	2.6.29
-Why:	needed only as a temporary solution until distros fix themselves up
-Who:	Jiri Slaby <jirislaby@gmail.com>
-
----------------------------
-
 What: print_fn_descriptor_symbol()
 When: October 2009
 Why:  The %pF vsprintf format provides the same functionality in a
@@ -361,7 +354,8 @@
 
 ---------------------------
 
-What:	i2c_attach_client(), i2c_detach_client(), i2c_driver->detach_client()
+What:	i2c_attach_client(), i2c_detach_client(), i2c_driver->detach_client(),
+	i2c_adapter->client_register(), i2c_adapter->client_unregister
 When:	2.6.30
 Check:	i2c_attach_client i2c_detach_client
 Why:	Deprecated by the new (standard) device driver binding model. Use
@@ -434,3 +428,12 @@
 	After a reasonable transition period, we will remove the legacy
 	fakephp interface.
 Who:	Alex Chiang <achiang@hp.com>
+
+---------------------------
+
+What:	i2c-voodoo3 driver
+When:	October 2009
+Why:	Superseded by tdfxfb. I2C/DDC support used to live in a separate
+	driver but this caused driver conflicts.
+Who:	Jean Delvare <khali@linux-fr.org>
+	Krzysztof Helt <krzysztof.h1@wp.pl>
diff --git a/Documentation/filesystems/00-INDEX b/Documentation/filesystems/00-INDEX
index 52cd611..8dd6db7 100644
--- a/Documentation/filesystems/00-INDEX
+++ b/Documentation/filesystems/00-INDEX
@@ -68,6 +68,8 @@
 	- info on Novell Netware(tm) filesystem using NCP protocol.
 nfsroot.txt
 	- short guide on setting up a diskless box with NFS root filesystem.
+nilfs2.txt
+	- info and mount options for the NILFS2 filesystem.
 ntfs.txt
 	- info and mount options for the NTFS filesystem (Windows NT).
 ocfs2.txt
diff --git a/Documentation/filesystems/caching/backend-api.txt b/Documentation/filesystems/caching/backend-api.txt
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..382d52c
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/filesystems/caching/backend-api.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,658 @@
+			  ==========================
+			  FS-CACHE CACHE BACKEND API
+			  ==========================
+
+The FS-Cache system provides an API by which actual caches can be supplied to
+FS-Cache for it to then serve out to network filesystems and other interested
+parties.
+
+This API is declared in <linux/fscache-cache.h>.
+
+
+====================================
+INITIALISING AND REGISTERING A CACHE
+====================================
+
+To start off, a cache definition must be initialised and registered for each
+cache the backend wants to make available.  For instance, CacheFS does this in
+the fill_super() operation on mounting.
+
+The cache definition (struct fscache_cache) should be initialised by calling:
+
+	void fscache_init_cache(struct fscache_cache *cache,
+				struct fscache_cache_ops *ops,
+				const char *idfmt,
+				...);
+
+Where:
+
+ (*) "cache" is a pointer to the cache definition;
+
+ (*) "ops" is a pointer to the table of operations that the backend supports on
+     this cache; and
+
+ (*) "idfmt" is a format and printf-style arguments for constructing a label
+     for the cache.
+
+
+The cache should then be registered with FS-Cache by passing a pointer to the
+previously initialised cache definition to:
+
+	int fscache_add_cache(struct fscache_cache *cache,
+			      struct fscache_object *fsdef,
+			      const char *tagname);
+
+Two extra arguments should also be supplied:
+
+ (*) "fsdef" which should point to the object representation for the FS-Cache
+     master index in this cache.  Netfs primary index entries will be created
+     here.  FS-Cache keeps the caller's reference to the index object if
+     successful and will release it upon withdrawal of the cache.
+
+ (*) "tagname" which, if given, should be a text string naming this cache.  If
+     this is NULL, the identifier will be used instead.  For CacheFS, the
+     identifier is set to name the underlying block device and the tag can be
+     supplied by mount.
+
+This function may return -ENOMEM if it ran out of memory or -EEXIST if the tag
+is already in use.  0 will be returned on success.
+
+
+=====================
+UNREGISTERING A CACHE
+=====================
+
+A cache can be withdrawn from the system by calling this function with a
+pointer to the cache definition:
+
+	void fscache_withdraw_cache(struct fscache_cache *cache);
+
+In CacheFS's case, this is called by put_super().
+
+
+========
+SECURITY
+========
+
+The cache methods are executed one of two contexts:
+
+ (1) that of the userspace process that issued the netfs operation that caused
+     the cache method to be invoked, or
+
+ (2) that of one of the processes in the FS-Cache thread pool.
+
+In either case, this may not be an appropriate context in which to access the
+cache.
+
+The calling process's fsuid, fsgid and SELinux security identities may need to
+be masqueraded for the duration of the cache driver's access to the cache.
+This is left to the cache to handle; FS-Cache makes no effort in this regard.
+
+
+===================================
+CONTROL AND STATISTICS PRESENTATION
+===================================
+
+The cache may present data to the outside world through FS-Cache's interfaces
+in sysfs and procfs - the former for control and the latter for statistics.
+
+A sysfs directory called /sys/fs/fscache/<cachetag>/ is created if CONFIG_SYSFS
+is enabled.  This is accessible through the kobject struct fscache_cache::kobj
+and is for use by the cache as it sees fit.
+
+
+========================
+RELEVANT DATA STRUCTURES
+========================
+
+ (*) Index/Data file FS-Cache representation cookie:
+
+	struct fscache_cookie {
+		struct fscache_object_def	*def;
+		struct fscache_netfs		*netfs;
+		void				*netfs_data;
+		...
+	};
+
+     The fields that might be of use to the backend describe the object
+     definition, the netfs definition and the netfs's data for this cookie.
+     The object definition contain functions supplied by the netfs for loading
+     and matching index entries; these are required to provide some of the
+     cache operations.
+
+
+ (*) In-cache object representation:
+
+	struct fscache_object {
+		int				debug_id;
+		enum {
+			FSCACHE_OBJECT_RECYCLING,
+			...
+		}				state;
+		spinlock_t			lock
+		struct fscache_cache		*cache;
+		struct fscache_cookie		*cookie;
+		...
+	};
+
+     Structures of this type should be allocated by the cache backend and
+     passed to FS-Cache when requested by the appropriate cache operation.  In
+     the case of CacheFS, they're embedded in CacheFS's internal object
+     structures.
+
+     The debug_id is a simple integer that can be used in debugging messages
+     that refer to a particular object.  In such a case it should be printed
+     using "OBJ%x" to be consistent with FS-Cache.
+
+     Each object contains a pointer to the cookie that represents the object it
+     is backing.  An object should retired when put_object() is called if it is
+     in state FSCACHE_OBJECT_RECYCLING.  The fscache_object struct should be
+     initialised by calling fscache_object_init(object).
+
+
+ (*) FS-Cache operation record:
+
+	struct fscache_operation {
+		atomic_t		usage;
+		struct fscache_object	*object;
+		unsigned long		flags;
+	#define FSCACHE_OP_EXCLUSIVE
+		void (*processor)(struct fscache_operation *op);
+		void (*release)(struct fscache_operation *op);
+		...
+	};
+
+     FS-Cache has a pool of threads that it uses to give CPU time to the
+     various asynchronous operations that need to be done as part of driving
+     the cache.  These are represented by the above structure.  The processor
+     method is called to give the op CPU time, and the release method to get
+     rid of it when its usage count reaches 0.
+
+     An operation can be made exclusive upon an object by setting the
+     appropriate flag before enqueuing it with fscache_enqueue_operation().  If
+     an operation needs more processing time, it should be enqueued again.
+
+
+ (*) FS-Cache retrieval operation record:
+
+	struct fscache_retrieval {
+		struct fscache_operation op;
+		struct address_space	*mapping;
+		struct list_head	*to_do;
+		...
+	};
+
+     A structure of this type is allocated by FS-Cache to record retrieval and
+     allocation requests made by the netfs.  This struct is then passed to the
+     backend to do the operation.  The backend may get extra refs to it by
+     calling fscache_get_retrieval() and refs may be discarded by calling
+     fscache_put_retrieval().
+
+     A retrieval operation can be used by the backend to do retrieval work.  To
+     do this, the retrieval->op.processor method pointer should be set
+     appropriately by the backend and fscache_enqueue_retrieval() called to
+     submit it to the thread pool.  CacheFiles, for example, uses this to queue
+     page examination when it detects PG_lock being cleared.
+
+     The to_do field is an empty list available for the cache backend to use as
+     it sees fit.
+
+
+ (*) FS-Cache storage operation record:
+
+	struct fscache_storage {
+		struct fscache_operation op;
+		pgoff_t			store_limit;
+		...
+	};
+
+     A structure of this type is allocated by FS-Cache to record outstanding
+     writes to be made.  FS-Cache itself enqueues this operation and invokes
+     the write_page() method on the object at appropriate times to effect
+     storage.
+
+
+================
+CACHE OPERATIONS
+================
+
+The cache backend provides FS-Cache with a table of operations that can be
+performed on the denizens of the cache.  These are held in a structure of type:
+
+	struct fscache_cache_ops
+
+ (*) Name of cache provider [mandatory]:
+
+	const char *name
+
+     This isn't strictly an operation, but should be pointed at a string naming
+     the backend.
+
+
+ (*) Allocate a new object [mandatory]:
+
+	struct fscache_object *(*alloc_object)(struct fscache_cache *cache,
+					       struct fscache_cookie *cookie)
+
+     This method is used to allocate a cache object representation to back a
+     cookie in a particular cache.  fscache_object_init() should be called on
+     the object to initialise it prior to returning.
+
+     This function may also be used to parse the index key to be used for
+     multiple lookup calls to turn it into a more convenient form.  FS-Cache
+     will call the lookup_complete() method to allow the cache to release the
+     form once lookup is complete or aborted.
+
+
+ (*) Look up and create object [mandatory]:
+
+	void (*lookup_object)(struct fscache_object *object)
+
+     This method is used to look up an object, given that the object is already
+     allocated and attached to the cookie.  This should instantiate that object
+     in the cache if it can.
+
+     The method should call fscache_object_lookup_negative() as soon as
+     possible if it determines the object doesn't exist in the cache.  If the
+     object is found to exist and the netfs indicates that it is valid then
+     fscache_obtained_object() should be called once the object is in a
+     position to have data stored in it.  Similarly, fscache_obtained_object()
+     should also be called once a non-present object has been created.
+
+     If a lookup error occurs, fscache_object_lookup_error() should be called
+     to abort the lookup of that object.
+
+
+ (*) Release lookup data [mandatory]:
+
+	void (*lookup_complete)(struct fscache_object *object)
+
+     This method is called to ask the cache to release any resources it was
+     using to perform a lookup.
+
+
+ (*) Increment object refcount [mandatory]:
+
+	struct fscache_object *(*grab_object)(struct fscache_object *object)
+
+     This method is called to increment the reference count on an object.  It
+     may fail (for instance if the cache is being withdrawn) by returning NULL.
+     It should return the object pointer if successful.
+
+
+ (*) Lock/Unlock object [mandatory]:
+
+	void (*lock_object)(struct fscache_object *object)
+	void (*unlock_object)(struct fscache_object *object)
+
+     These methods are used to exclusively lock an object.  It must be possible
+     to schedule with the lock held, so a spinlock isn't sufficient.
+
+
+ (*) Pin/Unpin object [optional]:
+
+	int (*pin_object)(struct fscache_object *object)
+	void (*unpin_object)(struct fscache_object *object)
+
+     These methods are used to pin an object into the cache.  Once pinned an
+     object cannot be reclaimed to make space.  Return -ENOSPC if there's not
+     enough space in the cache to permit this.
+
+
+ (*) Update object [mandatory]:
+
+	int (*update_object)(struct fscache_object *object)
+
+     This is called to update the index entry for the specified object.  The
+     new information should be in object->cookie->netfs_data.  This can be
+     obtained by calling object->cookie->def->get_aux()/get_attr().
+
+
+ (*) Discard object [mandatory]:
+
+	void (*drop_object)(struct fscache_object *object)
+
+     This method is called to indicate that an object has been unbound from its
+     cookie, and that the cache should release the object's resources and
+     retire it if it's in state FSCACHE_OBJECT_RECYCLING.
+
+     This method should not attempt to release any references held by the
+     caller.  The caller will invoke the put_object() method as appropriate.
+
+
+ (*) Release object reference [mandatory]:
+
+	void (*put_object)(struct fscache_object *object)
+
+     This method is used to discard a reference to an object.  The object may
+     be freed when all the references to it are released.
+
+
+ (*) Synchronise a cache [mandatory]:
+
+	void (*sync)(struct fscache_cache *cache)
+
+     This is called to ask the backend to synchronise a cache with its backing
+     device.
+
+
+ (*) Dissociate a cache [mandatory]:
+
+	void (*dissociate_pages)(struct fscache_cache *cache)
+
+     This is called to ask a cache to perform any page dissociations as part of
+     cache withdrawal.
+
+
+ (*) Notification that the attributes on a netfs file changed [mandatory]:
+
+	int (*attr_changed)(struct fscache_object *object);
+
+     This is called to indicate to the cache that certain attributes on a netfs
+     file have changed (for example the maximum size a file may reach).  The
+     cache can read these from the netfs by calling the cookie's get_attr()
+     method.
+
+     The cache may use the file size information to reserve space on the cache.
+     It should also call fscache_set_store_limit() to indicate to FS-Cache the
+     highest byte it's willing to store for an object.
+
+     This method may return -ve if an error occurred or the cache object cannot
+     be expanded.  In such a case, the object will be withdrawn from service.
+
+     This operation is run asynchronously from FS-Cache's thread pool, and
+     storage and retrieval operations from the netfs are excluded during the
+     execution of this operation.
+
+
+ (*) Reserve cache space for an object's data [optional]:
+
+	int (*reserve_space)(struct fscache_object *object, loff_t size);
+
+     This is called to request that cache space be reserved to hold the data
+     for an object and the metadata used to track it.  Zero size should be
+     taken as request to cancel a reservation.
+
+     This should return 0 if successful, -ENOSPC if there isn't enough space
+     available, or -ENOMEM or -EIO on other errors.
+
+     The reservation may exceed the current size of the object, thus permitting
+     future expansion.  If the amount of space consumed by an object would
+     exceed the reservation, it's permitted to refuse requests to allocate
+     pages, but not required.  An object may be pruned down to its reservation
+     size if larger than that already.
+
+
+ (*) Request page be read from cache [mandatory]:
+
+	int (*read_or_alloc_page)(struct fscache_retrieval *op,
+				  struct page *page,
+				  gfp_t gfp)
+
+     This is called to attempt to read a netfs page from the cache, or to
+     reserve a backing block if not.  FS-Cache will have done as much checking
+     as it can before calling, but most of the work belongs to the backend.
+
+     If there's no page in the cache, then -ENODATA should be returned if the
+     backend managed to reserve a backing block; -ENOBUFS or -ENOMEM if it
+     didn't.
+
+     If there is suitable data in the cache, then a read operation should be
+     queued and 0 returned.  When the read finishes, fscache_end_io() should be
+     called.
+
+     The fscache_mark_pages_cached() should be called for the page if any cache
+     metadata is retained.  This will indicate to the netfs that the page needs
+     explicit uncaching.  This operation takes a pagevec, thus allowing several
+     pages to be marked at once.
+
+     The retrieval record pointed to by op should be retained for each page
+     queued and released when I/O on the page has been formally ended.
+     fscache_get/put_retrieval() are available for this purpose.
+
+     The retrieval record may be used to get CPU time via the FS-Cache thread
+     pool.  If this is desired, the op->op.processor should be set to point to
+     the appropriate processing routine, and fscache_enqueue_retrieval() should
+     be called at an appropriate point to request CPU time.  For instance, the
+     retrieval routine could be enqueued upon the completion of a disk read.
+     The to_do field in the retrieval record is provided to aid in this.
+
+     If an I/O error occurs, fscache_io_error() should be called and -ENOBUFS
+     returned if possible or fscache_end_io() called with a suitable error
+     code..
+
+
+ (*) Request pages be read from cache [mandatory]:
+
+	int (*read_or_alloc_pages)(struct fscache_retrieval *op,
+				   struct list_head *pages,
+				   unsigned *nr_pages,
+				   gfp_t gfp)
+
+     This is like the read_or_alloc_page() method, except it is handed a list
+     of pages instead of one page.  Any pages on which a read operation is
+     started must be added to the page cache for the specified mapping and also
+     to the LRU.  Such pages must also be removed from the pages list and
+     *nr_pages decremented per page.
+
+     If there was an error such as -ENOMEM, then that should be returned; else
+     if one or more pages couldn't be read or allocated, then -ENOBUFS should
+     be returned; else if one or more pages couldn't be read, then -ENODATA
+     should be returned.  If all the pages are dispatched then 0 should be
+     returned.
+
+
+ (*) Request page be allocated in the cache [mandatory]:
+
+	int (*allocate_page)(struct fscache_retrieval *op,
+			     struct page *page,
+			     gfp_t gfp)
+
+     This is like the read_or_alloc_page() method, except that it shouldn't
+     read from the cache, even if there's data there that could be retrieved.
+     It should, however, set up any internal metadata required such that
+     the write_page() method can write to the cache.
+
+     If there's no backing block available, then -ENOBUFS should be returned
+     (or -ENOMEM if there were other problems).  If a block is successfully
+     allocated, then the netfs page should be marked and 0 returned.
+
+
+ (*) Request pages be allocated in the cache [mandatory]:
+
+	int (*allocate_pages)(struct fscache_retrieval *op,
+			      struct list_head *pages,
+			      unsigned *nr_pages,
+			      gfp_t gfp)
+
+     This is an multiple page version of the allocate_page() method.  pages and
+     nr_pages should be treated as for the read_or_alloc_pages() method.
+
+
+ (*) Request page be written to cache [mandatory]:
+
+	int (*write_page)(struct fscache_storage *op,
+			  struct page *page);
+
+     This is called to write from a page on which there was a previously
+     successful read_or_alloc_page() call or similar.  FS-Cache filters out
+     pages that don't have mappings.
+
+     This method is called asynchronously from the FS-Cache thread pool.  It is
+     not required to actually store anything, provided -ENODATA is then
+     returned to the next read of this page.
+
+     If an error occurred, then a negative error code should be returned,
+     otherwise zero should be returned.  FS-Cache will take appropriate action
+     in response to an error, such as withdrawing this object.
+
+     If this method returns success then FS-Cache will inform the netfs
+     appropriately.
+
+
+ (*) Discard retained per-page metadata [mandatory]:
+
+	void (*uncache_page)(struct fscache_object *object, struct page *page)
+
+     This is called when a netfs page is being evicted from the pagecache.  The
+     cache backend should tear down any internal representation or tracking it
+     maintains for this page.
+
+
+==================
+FS-CACHE UTILITIES
+==================
+
+FS-Cache provides some utilities that a cache backend may make use of:
+
+ (*) Note occurrence of an I/O error in a cache:
+
+	void fscache_io_error(struct fscache_cache *cache)
+
+     This tells FS-Cache that an I/O error occurred in the cache.  After this
+     has been called, only resource dissociation operations (object and page
+     release) will be passed from the netfs to the cache backend for the
+     specified cache.
+
+     This does not actually withdraw the cache.  That must be done separately.
+
+
+ (*) Invoke the retrieval I/O completion function:
+
+	void fscache_end_io(struct fscache_retrieval *op, struct page *page,
+			    int error);
+
+     This is called to note the end of an attempt to retrieve a page.  The
+     error value should be 0 if successful and an error otherwise.
+
+
+ (*) Set highest store limit:
+
+	void fscache_set_store_limit(struct fscache_object *object,
+				     loff_t i_size);
+
+     This sets the limit FS-Cache imposes on the highest byte it's willing to
+     try and store for a netfs.  Any page over this limit is automatically
+     rejected by fscache_read_alloc_page() and co with -ENOBUFS.
+
+
+ (*) Mark pages as being cached:
+
+	void fscache_mark_pages_cached(struct fscache_retrieval *op,
+				       struct pagevec *pagevec);
+
+     This marks a set of pages as being cached.  After this has been called,
+     the netfs must call fscache_uncache_page() to unmark the pages.
+
+
+ (*) Perform coherency check on an object:
+
+	enum fscache_checkaux fscache_check_aux(struct fscache_object *object,
+						const void *data,
+						uint16_t datalen);
+
+     This asks the netfs to perform a coherency check on an object that has
+     just been looked up.  The cookie attached to the object will determine the
+     netfs to use.  data and datalen should specify where the auxiliary data
+     retrieved from the cache can be found.
+
+     One of three values will be returned:
+
+	(*) FSCACHE_CHECKAUX_OKAY
+
+	    The coherency data indicates the object is valid as is.
+
+	(*) FSCACHE_CHECKAUX_NEEDS_UPDATE
+
+	    The coherency data needs updating, but otherwise the object is
+	    valid.
+
+	(*) FSCACHE_CHECKAUX_OBSOLETE
+
+	    The coherency data indicates that the object is obsolete and should
+	    be discarded.
+
+
+ (*) Initialise a freshly allocated object:
+
+	void fscache_object_init(struct fscache_object *object);
+
+     This initialises all the fields in an object representation.
+
+
+ (*) Indicate the destruction of an object:
+
+	void fscache_object_destroyed(struct fscache_cache *cache);
+
+     This must be called to inform FS-Cache that an object that belonged to a
+     cache has been destroyed and deallocated.  This will allow continuation
+     of the cache withdrawal process when it is stopped pending destruction of
+     all the objects.
+
+
+ (*) Indicate negative lookup on an object:
+
+	void fscache_object_lookup_negative(struct fscache_object *object);
+
+     This is called to indicate to FS-Cache that a lookup process for an object
+     found a negative result.
+
+     This changes the state of an object to permit reads pending on lookup
+     completion to go off and start fetching data from the netfs server as it's
+     known at this point that there can't be any data in the cache.
+
+     This may be called multiple times on an object.  Only the first call is
+     significant - all subsequent calls are ignored.
+
+
+ (*) Indicate an object has been obtained:
+
+	void fscache_obtained_object(struct fscache_object *object);
+
+     This is called to indicate to FS-Cache that a lookup process for an object
+     produced a positive result, or that an object was created.  This should
+     only be called once for any particular object.
+
+     This changes the state of an object to indicate:
+
+	(1) if no call to fscache_object_lookup_negative() has been made on
+	    this object, that there may be data available, and that reads can
+	    now go and look for it; and
+
+        (2) that writes may now proceed against this object.
+
+
+ (*) Indicate that object lookup failed:
+
+	void fscache_object_lookup_error(struct fscache_object *object);
+
+     This marks an object as having encountered a fatal error (usually EIO)
+     and causes it to move into a state whereby it will be withdrawn as soon
+     as possible.
+
+
+ (*) Get and release references on a retrieval record:
+
+	void fscache_get_retrieval(struct fscache_retrieval *op);
+	void fscache_put_retrieval(struct fscache_retrieval *op);
+
+     These two functions are used to retain a retrieval record whilst doing
+     asynchronous data retrieval and block allocation.
+
+
+ (*) Enqueue a retrieval record for processing.
+
+	void fscache_enqueue_retrieval(struct fscache_retrieval *op);
+
+     This enqueues a retrieval record for processing by the FS-Cache thread
+     pool.  One of the threads in the pool will invoke the retrieval record's
+     op->op.processor callback function.  This function may be called from
+     within the callback function.
+
+
+ (*) List of object state names:
+
+	const char *fscache_object_states[];
+
+     For debugging purposes, this may be used to turn the state that an object
+     is in into a text string for display purposes.
diff --git a/Documentation/filesystems/caching/cachefiles.txt b/Documentation/filesystems/caching/cachefiles.txt
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..c78a49b
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/filesystems/caching/cachefiles.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,501 @@
+	       ===============================================
+	       CacheFiles: CACHE ON ALREADY MOUNTED FILESYSTEM
+	       ===============================================
+
+Contents:
+
+ (*) Overview.
+
+ (*) Requirements.
+
+ (*) Configuration.
+
+ (*) Starting the cache.
+
+ (*) Things to avoid.
+
+ (*) Cache culling.
+
+ (*) Cache structure.
+
+ (*) Security model and SELinux.
+
+ (*) A note on security.
+
+ (*) Statistical information.
+
+ (*) Debugging.
+
+
+========
+OVERVIEW
+========
+
+CacheFiles is a caching backend that's meant to use as a cache a directory on
+an already mounted filesystem of a local type (such as Ext3).
+
+CacheFiles uses a userspace daemon to do some of the cache management - such as
+reaping stale nodes and culling.  This is called cachefilesd and lives in
+/sbin.
+
+The filesystem and data integrity of the cache are only as good as those of the
+filesystem providing the backing services.  Note that CacheFiles does not
+attempt to journal anything since the journalling interfaces of the various
+filesystems are very specific in nature.
+
+CacheFiles creates a misc character device - "/dev/cachefiles" - that is used
+to communication with the daemon.  Only one thing may have this open at once,
+and whilst it is open, a cache is at least partially in existence.  The daemon
+opens this and sends commands down it to control the cache.
+
+CacheFiles is currently limited to a single cache.
+
+CacheFiles attempts to maintain at least a certain percentage of free space on
+the filesystem, shrinking the cache by culling the objects it contains to make
+space if necessary - see the "Cache Culling" section.  This means it can be
+placed on the same medium as a live set of data, and will expand to make use of
+spare space and automatically contract when the set of data requires more
+space.
+
+
+============
+REQUIREMENTS
+============
+
+The use of CacheFiles and its daemon requires the following features to be
+available in the system and in the cache filesystem:
+
+	- dnotify.
+
+	- extended attributes (xattrs).
+
+	- openat() and friends.
+
+	- bmap() support on files in the filesystem (FIBMAP ioctl).
+
+	- The use of bmap() to detect a partial page at the end of the file.
+
+It is strongly recommended that the "dir_index" option is enabled on Ext3
+filesystems being used as a cache.
+
+
+=============
+CONFIGURATION
+=============
+
+The cache is configured by a script in /etc/cachefilesd.conf.  These commands
+set up cache ready for use.  The following script commands are available:
+
+ (*) brun <N>%
+ (*) bcull <N>%
+ (*) bstop <N>%
+ (*) frun <N>%
+ (*) fcull <N>%
+ (*) fstop <N>%
+
+	Configure the culling limits.  Optional.  See the section on culling
+	The defaults are 7% (run), 5% (cull) and 1% (stop) respectively.
+
+	The commands beginning with a 'b' are file space (block) limits, those
+	beginning with an 'f' are file count limits.
+
+ (*) dir <path>
+
+	Specify the directory containing the root of the cache.  Mandatory.
+
+ (*) tag <name>
+
+	Specify a tag to FS-Cache to use in distinguishing multiple caches.
+	Optional.  The default is "CacheFiles".
+
+ (*) debug <mask>
+
+	Specify a numeric bitmask to control debugging in the kernel module.
+	Optional.  The default is zero (all off).  The following values can be
+	OR'd into the mask to collect various information:
+
+		1	Turn on trace of function entry (_enter() macros)
+		2	Turn on trace of function exit (_leave() macros)
+		4	Turn on trace of internal debug points (_debug())
+
+	This mask can also be set through sysfs, eg:
+
+		echo 5 >/sys/modules/cachefiles/parameters/debug
+
+
+==================
+STARTING THE CACHE
+==================
+
+The cache is started by running the daemon.  The daemon opens the cache device,
+configures the cache and tells it to begin caching.  At that point the cache
+binds to fscache and the cache becomes live.
+
+The daemon is run as follows:
+
+	/sbin/cachefilesd [-d]* [-s] [-n] [-f <configfile>]
+
+The flags are:
+
+ (*) -d
+
+	Increase the debugging level.  This can be specified multiple times and
+	is cumulative with itself.
+
+ (*) -s
+
+	Send messages to stderr instead of syslog.
+
+ (*) -n
+
+	Don't daemonise and go into background.
+
+ (*) -f <configfile>
+
+	Use an alternative configuration file rather than the default one.
+
+
+===============
+THINGS TO AVOID
+===============
+
+Do not mount other things within the cache as this will cause problems.  The
+kernel module contains its own very cut-down path walking facility that ignores
+mountpoints, but the daemon can't avoid them.
+
+Do not create, rename or unlink files and directories in the cache whilst the
+cache is active, as this may cause the state to become uncertain.
+
+Renaming files in the cache might make objects appear to be other objects (the
+filename is part of the lookup key).
+
+Do not change or remove the extended attributes attached to cache files by the
+cache as this will cause the cache state management to get confused.
+
+Do not create files or directories in the cache, lest the cache get confused or
+serve incorrect data.
+
+Do not chmod files in the cache.  The module creates things with minimal
+permissions to prevent random users being able to access them directly.
+
+
+=============
+CACHE CULLING
+=============
+
+The cache may need culling occasionally to make space.  This involves
+discarding objects from the cache that have been used less recently than
+anything else.  Culling is based on the access time of data objects.  Empty
+directories are culled if not in use.
+
+Cache culling is done on the basis of the percentage of blocks and the
+percentage of files available in the underlying filesystem.  There are six
+"limits":
+
+ (*) brun
+ (*) frun
+
+     If the amount of free space and the number of available files in the cache
+     rises above both these limits, then culling is turned off.
+
+ (*) bcull
+ (*) fcull
+
+     If the amount of available space or the number of available files in the
+     cache falls below either of these limits, then culling is started.
+
+ (*) bstop
+ (*) fstop
+
+     If the amount of available space or the number of available files in the
+     cache falls below either of these limits, then no further allocation of
+     disk space or files is permitted until culling has raised things above
+     these limits again.
+
+These must be configured thusly:
+
+	0 <= bstop < bcull < brun < 100
+	0 <= fstop < fcull < frun < 100
+
+Note that these are percentages of available space and available files, and do
+_not_ appear as 100 minus the percentage displayed by the "df" program.
+
+The userspace daemon scans the cache to build up a table of cullable objects.
+These are then culled in least recently used order.  A new scan of the cache is
+started as soon as space is made in the table.  Objects will be skipped if
+their atimes have changed or if the kernel module says it is still using them.
+
+
+===============
+CACHE STRUCTURE
+===============
+
+The CacheFiles module will create two directories in the directory it was
+given:
+
+ (*) cache/
+
+ (*) graveyard/
+
+The active cache objects all reside in the first directory.  The CacheFiles
+kernel module moves any retired or culled objects that it can't simply unlink
+to the graveyard from which the daemon will actually delete them.
+
+The daemon uses dnotify to monitor the graveyard directory, and will delete
+anything that appears therein.
+
+
+The module represents index objects as directories with the filename "I..." or
+"J...".  Note that the "cache/" directory is itself a special index.
+
+Data objects are represented as files if they have no children, or directories
+if they do.  Their filenames all begin "D..." or "E...".  If represented as a
+directory, data objects will have a file in the directory called "data" that
+actually holds the data.
+
+Special objects are similar to data objects, except their filenames begin
+"S..." or "T...".
+
+
+If an object has children, then it will be represented as a directory.
+Immediately in the representative directory are a collection of directories
+named for hash values of the child object keys with an '@' prepended.  Into
+this directory, if possible, will be placed the representations of the child
+objects:
+
+	INDEX     INDEX      INDEX                             DATA FILES
+	========= ========== ================================= ================
+	cache/@4a/I03nfs/@30/Ji000000000000000--fHg8hi8400
+	cache/@4a/I03nfs/@30/Ji000000000000000--fHg8hi8400/@75/Es0g000w...DB1ry
+	cache/@4a/I03nfs/@30/Ji000000000000000--fHg8hi8400/@75/Es0g000w...N22ry
+	cache/@4a/I03nfs/@30/Ji000000000000000--fHg8hi8400/@75/Es0g000w...FP1ry
+
+
+If the key is so long that it exceeds NAME_MAX with the decorations added on to
+it, then it will be cut into pieces, the first few of which will be used to
+make a nest of directories, and the last one of which will be the objects
+inside the last directory.  The names of the intermediate directories will have
+'+' prepended:
+
+	J1223/@23/+xy...z/+kl...m/Epqr
+
+
+Note that keys are raw data, and not only may they exceed NAME_MAX in size,
+they may also contain things like '/' and NUL characters, and so they may not
+be suitable for turning directly into a filename.
+
+To handle this, CacheFiles will use a suitably printable filename directly and
+"base-64" encode ones that aren't directly suitable.  The two versions of
+object filenames indicate the encoding:
+
+	OBJECT TYPE	PRINTABLE	ENCODED
+	===============	===============	===============
+	Index		"I..."		"J..."
+	Data		"D..."		"E..."
+	Special		"S..."		"T..."
+
+Intermediate directories are always "@" or "+" as appropriate.
+
+
+Each object in the cache has an extended attribute label that holds the object
+type ID (required to distinguish special objects) and the auxiliary data from
+the netfs.  The latter is used to detect stale objects in the cache and update
+or retire them.
+
+
+Note that CacheFiles will erase from the cache any file it doesn't recognise or
+any file of an incorrect type (such as a FIFO file or a device file).
+
+
+==========================
+SECURITY MODEL AND SELINUX
+==========================
+
+CacheFiles is implemented to deal properly with the LSM security features of
+the Linux kernel and the SELinux facility.
+
+One of the problems that CacheFiles faces is that it is generally acting on
+behalf of a process, and running in that process's context, and that includes a
+security context that is not appropriate for accessing the cache - either
+because the files in the cache are inaccessible to that process, or because if
+the process creates a file in the cache, that file may be inaccessible to other
+processes.
+
+The way CacheFiles works is to temporarily change the security context (fsuid,
+fsgid and actor security label) that the process acts as - without changing the
+security context of the process when it the target of an operation performed by
+some other process (so signalling and suchlike still work correctly).
+
+
+When the CacheFiles module is asked to bind to its cache, it:
+
+ (1) Finds the security label attached to the root cache directory and uses
+     that as the security label with which it will create files.  By default,
+     this is:
+
+	cachefiles_var_t
+
+ (2) Finds the security label of the process which issued the bind request
+     (presumed to be the cachefilesd daemon), which by default will be:
+
+	cachefilesd_t
+
+     and asks LSM to supply a security ID as which it should act given the
+     daemon's label.  By default, this will be:
+
+	cachefiles_kernel_t
+
+     SELinux transitions the daemon's security ID to the module's security ID
+     based on a rule of this form in the policy.
+
+	type_transition <daemon's-ID> kernel_t : process <module's-ID>;
+
+     For instance:
+
+	type_transition cachefilesd_t kernel_t : process cachefiles_kernel_t;
+
+
+The module's security ID gives it permission to create, move and remove files
+and directories in the cache, to find and access directories and files in the
+cache, to set and access extended attributes on cache objects, and to read and
+write files in the cache.
+
+The daemon's security ID gives it only a very restricted set of permissions: it
+may scan directories, stat files and erase files and directories.  It may
+not read or write files in the cache, and so it is precluded from accessing the
+data cached therein; nor is it permitted to create new files in the cache.
+
+
+There are policy source files available in:
+
+	http://people.redhat.com/~dhowells/fscache/cachefilesd-0.8.tar.bz2
+
+and later versions.  In that tarball, see the files:
+
+	cachefilesd.te
+	cachefilesd.fc
+	cachefilesd.if
+
+They are built and installed directly by the RPM.
+
+If a non-RPM based system is being used, then copy the above files to their own
+directory and run:
+
+	make -f /usr/share/selinux/devel/Makefile
+	semodule -i cachefilesd.pp
+
+You will need checkpolicy and selinux-policy-devel installed prior to the
+build.
+
+
+By default, the cache is located in /var/fscache, but if it is desirable that
+it should be elsewhere, than either the above policy files must be altered, or
+an auxiliary policy must be installed to label the alternate location of the
+cache.
+
+For instructions on how to add an auxiliary policy to enable the cache to be
+located elsewhere when SELinux is in enforcing mode, please see:
+
+	/usr/share/doc/cachefilesd-*/move-cache.txt
+
+When the cachefilesd rpm is installed; alternatively, the document can be found
+in the sources.
+
+
+==================
+A NOTE ON SECURITY
+==================
+
+CacheFiles makes use of the split security in the task_struct.  It allocates
+its own task_security structure, and redirects current->act_as to point to it
+when it acts on behalf of another process, in that process's context.
+
+The reason it does this is that it calls vfs_mkdir() and suchlike rather than
+bypassing security and calling inode ops directly.  Therefore the VFS and LSM
+may deny the CacheFiles access to the cache data because under some
+circumstances the caching code is running in the security context of whatever
+process issued the original syscall on the netfs.
+
+Furthermore, should CacheFiles create a file or directory, the security
+parameters with that object is created (UID, GID, security label) would be
+derived from that process that issued the system call, thus potentially
+preventing other processes from accessing the cache - including CacheFiles's
+cache management daemon (cachefilesd).
+
+What is required is to temporarily override the security of the process that
+issued the system call.  We can't, however, just do an in-place change of the
+security data as that affects the process as an object, not just as a subject.
+This means it may lose signals or ptrace events for example, and affects what
+the process looks like in /proc.
+
+So CacheFiles makes use of a logical split in the security between the
+objective security (task->sec) and the subjective security (task->act_as).  The
+objective security holds the intrinsic security properties of a process and is
+never overridden.  This is what appears in /proc, and is what is used when a
+process is the target of an operation by some other process (SIGKILL for
+example).
+
+The subjective security holds the active security properties of a process, and
+may be overridden.  This is not seen externally, and is used whan a process
+acts upon another object, for example SIGKILLing another process or opening a
+file.
+
+LSM hooks exist that allow SELinux (or Smack or whatever) to reject a request
+for CacheFiles to run in a context of a specific security label, or to create
+files and directories with another security label.
+
+
+=======================
+STATISTICAL INFORMATION
+=======================
+
+If FS-Cache is compiled with the following option enabled:
+
+	CONFIG_CACHEFILES_HISTOGRAM=y
+
+then it will gather certain statistics and display them through a proc file.
+
+ (*) /proc/fs/cachefiles/histogram
+
+	cat /proc/fs/cachefiles/histogram
+	JIFS  SECS  LOOKUPS   MKDIRS    CREATES
+	===== ===== ========= ========= =========
+
+     This shows the breakdown of the number of times each amount of time
+     between 0 jiffies and HZ-1 jiffies a variety of tasks took to run.  The
+     columns are as follows:
+
+	COLUMN		TIME MEASUREMENT
+	=======		=======================================================
+	LOOKUPS		Length of time to perform a lookup on the backing fs
+	MKDIRS		Length of time to perform a mkdir on the backing fs
+	CREATES		Length of time to perform a create on the backing fs
+
+     Each row shows the number of events that took a particular range of times.
+     Each step is 1 jiffy in size.  The JIFS column indicates the particular
+     jiffy range covered, and the SECS field the equivalent number of seconds.
+
+
+=========
+DEBUGGING
+=========
+
+If CONFIG_CACHEFILES_DEBUG is enabled, the CacheFiles facility can have runtime
+debugging enabled by adjusting the value in:
+
+	/sys/module/cachefiles/parameters/debug
+
+This is a bitmask of debugging streams to enable:
+
+	BIT	VALUE	STREAM				POINT
+	=======	=======	===============================	=======================
+	0	1	General				Function entry trace
+	1	2					Function exit trace
+	2	4					General
+
+The appropriate set of values should be OR'd together and the result written to
+the control file.  For example:
+
+	echo $((1|4|8)) >/sys/module/cachefiles/parameters/debug
+
+will turn on all function entry debugging.
diff --git a/Documentation/filesystems/caching/fscache.txt b/Documentation/filesystems/caching/fscache.txt
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..9e94b94
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/filesystems/caching/fscache.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,333 @@
+			  ==========================
+			  General Filesystem Caching
+			  ==========================
+
+========
+OVERVIEW
+========
+
+This facility is a general purpose cache for network filesystems, though it
+could be used for caching other things such as ISO9660 filesystems too.
+
+FS-Cache mediates between cache backends (such as CacheFS) and network
+filesystems:
+
+	+---------+
+	|         |                        +--------------+
+	|   NFS   |--+                     |              |
+	|         |  |                 +-->|   CacheFS    |
+	+---------+  |   +----------+  |   |  /dev/hda5   |
+	             |   |          |  |   +--------------+
+	+---------+  +-->|          |  |
+	|         |      |          |--+
+	|   AFS   |----->| FS-Cache |
+	|         |      |          |--+
+	+---------+  +-->|          |  |
+	             |   |          |  |   +--------------+
+	+---------+  |   +----------+  |   |              |
+	|         |  |                 +-->|  CacheFiles  |
+	|  ISOFS  |--+                     |  /var/cache  |
+	|         |                        +--------------+
+	+---------+
+
+Or to look at it another way, FS-Cache is a module that provides a caching
+facility to a network filesystem such that the cache is transparent to the
+user:
+
+	+---------+
+	|         |
+	| Server  |
+	|         |
+	+---------+
+	     |                  NETWORK
+	~~~~~|~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+	     |
+	     |           +----------+
+	     V           |          |
+	+---------+      |          |
+	|         |      |          |
+	|   NFS   |----->| FS-Cache |
+	|         |      |          |--+
+	+---------+      |          |  |   +--------------+   +--------------+
+	     |           |          |  |   |              |   |              |
+	     V           +----------+  +-->|  CacheFiles  |-->|  Ext3        |
+	+---------+                        |  /var/cache  |   |  /dev/sda6   |
+	|         |                        +--------------+   +--------------+
+	|   VFS   |                                ^                     ^
+	|         |                                |                     |
+	+---------+                                +--------------+      |
+	     |                  KERNEL SPACE                      |      |
+	~~~~~|~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~|~~~~~~|~~~~
+	     |                  USER SPACE                        |      |
+	     V                                                    |      |
+	+---------+                                           +--------------+
+	|         |                                           |              |
+	| Process |                                           | cachefilesd  |
+	|         |                                           |              |
+	+---------+                                           +--------------+
+
+
+FS-Cache does not follow the idea of completely loading every netfs file
+opened in its entirety into a cache before permitting it to be accessed and
+then serving the pages out of that cache rather than the netfs inode because:
+
+ (1) It must be practical to operate without a cache.
+
+ (2) The size of any accessible file must not be limited to the size of the
+     cache.
+
+ (3) The combined size of all opened files (this includes mapped libraries)
+     must not be limited to the size of the cache.
+
+ (4) The user should not be forced to download an entire file just to do a
+     one-off access of a small portion of it (such as might be done with the
+     "file" program).
+
+It instead serves the cache out in PAGE_SIZE chunks as and when requested by
+the netfs('s) using it.
+
+
+FS-Cache provides the following facilities:
+
+ (1) More than one cache can be used at once.  Caches can be selected
+     explicitly by use of tags.
+
+ (2) Caches can be added / removed at any time.
+
+ (3) The netfs is provided with an interface that allows either party to
+     withdraw caching facilities from a file (required for (2)).
+
+ (4) The interface to the netfs returns as few errors as possible, preferring
+     rather to let the netfs remain oblivious.
+
+ (5) Cookies are used to represent indices, files and other objects to the
+     netfs.  The simplest cookie is just a NULL pointer - indicating nothing
+     cached there.
+
+ (6) The netfs is allowed to propose - dynamically - any index hierarchy it
+     desires, though it must be aware that the index search function is
+     recursive, stack space is limited, and indices can only be children of
+     indices.
+
+ (7) Data I/O is done direct to and from the netfs's pages.  The netfs
+     indicates that page A is at index B of the data-file represented by cookie
+     C, and that it should be read or written.  The cache backend may or may
+     not start I/O on that page, but if it does, a netfs callback will be
+     invoked to indicate completion.  The I/O may be either synchronous or
+     asynchronous.
+
+ (8) Cookies can be "retired" upon release.  At this point FS-Cache will mark
+     them as obsolete and the index hierarchy rooted at that point will get
+     recycled.
+
+ (9) The netfs provides a "match" function for index searches.  In addition to
+     saying whether a match was made or not, this can also specify that an
+     entry should be updated or deleted.
+
+(10) As much as possible is done asynchronously.
+
+
+FS-Cache maintains a virtual indexing tree in which all indices, files, objects
+and pages are kept.  Bits of this tree may actually reside in one or more
+caches.
+
+                                           FSDEF
+                                             |
+                        +------------------------------------+
+                        |                                    |
+                       NFS                                  AFS
+                        |                                    |
+           +--------------------------+                +-----------+
+           |                          |                |           |
+        homedir                     mirror          afs.org   redhat.com
+           |                          |                            |
+     +------------+           +---------------+              +----------+
+     |            |           |               |              |          |
+   00001        00002       00007           00125        vol00001   vol00002
+     |            |           |               |                         |
+ +---+---+     +-----+      +---+      +------+------+            +-----+----+
+ |   |   |     |     |      |   |      |      |      |            |     |    |
+PG0 PG1 PG2   PG0  XATTR   PG0 PG1   DIRENT DIRENT DIRENT        R/W   R/O  Bak
+                     |                                            |
+                    PG0                                       +-------+
+                                                              |       |
+                                                            00001   00003
+                                                              |
+                                                          +---+---+
+                                                          |   |   |
+                                                         PG0 PG1 PG2
+
+In the example above, you can see two netfs's being backed: NFS and AFS.  These
+have different index hierarchies:
+
+ (*) The NFS primary index contains per-server indices.  Each server index is
+     indexed by NFS file handles to get data file objects.  Each data file
+     objects can have an array of pages, but may also have further child
+     objects, such as extended attributes and directory entries.  Extended
+     attribute objects themselves have page-array contents.
+
+ (*) The AFS primary index contains per-cell indices.  Each cell index contains
+     per-logical-volume indices.  Each of volume index contains up to three
+     indices for the read-write, read-only and backup mirrors of those volumes.
+     Each of these contains vnode data file objects, each of which contains an
+     array of pages.
+
+The very top index is the FS-Cache master index in which individual netfs's
+have entries.
+
+Any index object may reside in more than one cache, provided it only has index
+children.  Any index with non-index object children will be assumed to only
+reside in one cache.
+
+
+The netfs API to FS-Cache can be found in:
+
+	Documentation/filesystems/caching/netfs-api.txt
+
+The cache backend API to FS-Cache can be found in:
+
+	Documentation/filesystems/caching/backend-api.txt
+
+A description of the internal representations and object state machine can be
+found in:
+
+	Documentation/filesystems/caching/object.txt
+
+
+=======================
+STATISTICAL INFORMATION
+=======================
+
+If FS-Cache is compiled with the following options enabled:
+
+	CONFIG_FSCACHE_STATS=y
+	CONFIG_FSCACHE_HISTOGRAM=y
+
+then it will gather certain statistics and display them through a number of
+proc files.
+
+ (*) /proc/fs/fscache/stats
+
+     This shows counts of a number of events that can happen in FS-Cache:
+
+	CLASS	EVENT	MEANING
+	=======	=======	=======================================================
+	Cookies	idx=N	Number of index cookies allocated
+		dat=N	Number of data storage cookies allocated
+		spc=N	Number of special cookies allocated
+	Objects	alc=N	Number of objects allocated
+		nal=N	Number of object allocation failures
+		avl=N	Number of objects that reached the available state
+		ded=N	Number of objects that reached the dead state
+	ChkAux	non=N	Number of objects that didn't have a coherency check
+		ok=N	Number of objects that passed a coherency check
+		upd=N	Number of objects that needed a coherency data update
+		obs=N	Number of objects that were declared obsolete
+	Pages	mrk=N	Number of pages marked as being cached
+		unc=N	Number of uncache page requests seen
+	Acquire	n=N	Number of acquire cookie requests seen
+		nul=N	Number of acq reqs given a NULL parent
+		noc=N	Number of acq reqs rejected due to no cache available
+		ok=N	Number of acq reqs succeeded
+		nbf=N	Number of acq reqs rejected due to error
+		oom=N	Number of acq reqs failed on ENOMEM
+	Lookups	n=N	Number of lookup calls made on cache backends
+		neg=N	Number of negative lookups made
+		pos=N	Number of positive lookups made
+		crt=N	Number of objects created by lookup
+	Updates	n=N	Number of update cookie requests seen
+		nul=N	Number of upd reqs given a NULL parent
+		run=N	Number of upd reqs granted CPU time
+	Relinqs	n=N	Number of relinquish cookie requests seen
+		nul=N	Number of rlq reqs given a NULL parent
+		wcr=N	Number of rlq reqs waited on completion of creation
+	AttrChg	n=N	Number of attribute changed requests seen
+		ok=N	Number of attr changed requests queued
+		nbf=N	Number of attr changed rejected -ENOBUFS
+		oom=N	Number of attr changed failed -ENOMEM
+		run=N	Number of attr changed ops given CPU time
+	Allocs	n=N	Number of allocation requests seen
+		ok=N	Number of successful alloc reqs
+		wt=N	Number of alloc reqs that waited on lookup completion
+		nbf=N	Number of alloc reqs rejected -ENOBUFS
+		ops=N	Number of alloc reqs submitted
+		owt=N	Number of alloc reqs waited for CPU time
+	Retrvls	n=N	Number of retrieval (read) requests seen
+		ok=N	Number of successful retr reqs
+		wt=N	Number of retr reqs that waited on lookup completion
+		nod=N	Number of retr reqs returned -ENODATA
+		nbf=N	Number of retr reqs rejected -ENOBUFS
+		int=N	Number of retr reqs aborted -ERESTARTSYS
+		oom=N	Number of retr reqs failed -ENOMEM
+		ops=N	Number of retr reqs submitted
+		owt=N	Number of retr reqs waited for CPU time
+	Stores	n=N	Number of storage (write) requests seen
+		ok=N	Number of successful store reqs
+		agn=N	Number of store reqs on a page already pending storage
+		nbf=N	Number of store reqs rejected -ENOBUFS
+		oom=N	Number of store reqs failed -ENOMEM
+		ops=N	Number of store reqs submitted
+		run=N	Number of store reqs granted CPU time
+	Ops	pend=N	Number of times async ops added to pending queues
+		run=N	Number of times async ops given CPU time
+		enq=N	Number of times async ops queued for processing
+		dfr=N	Number of async ops queued for deferred release
+		rel=N	Number of async ops released
+		gc=N	Number of deferred-release async ops garbage collected
+
+
+ (*) /proc/fs/fscache/histogram
+
+	cat /proc/fs/fscache/histogram
+	JIFS  SECS  OBJ INST  OP RUNS   OBJ RUNS  RETRV DLY RETRIEVLS
+	===== ===== ========= ========= ========= ========= =========
+
+     This shows the breakdown of the number of times each amount of time
+     between 0 jiffies and HZ-1 jiffies a variety of tasks took to run.  The
+     columns are as follows:
+
+	COLUMN		TIME MEASUREMENT
+	=======		=======================================================
+	OBJ INST	Length of time to instantiate an object
+	OP RUNS		Length of time a call to process an operation took
+	OBJ RUNS	Length of time a call to process an object event took
+	RETRV DLY	Time between an requesting a read and lookup completing
+	RETRIEVLS	Time between beginning and end of a retrieval
+
+     Each row shows the number of events that took a particular range of times.
+     Each step is 1 jiffy in size.  The JIFS column indicates the particular
+     jiffy range covered, and the SECS field the equivalent number of seconds.
+
+
+=========
+DEBUGGING
+=========
+
+If CONFIG_FSCACHE_DEBUG is enabled, the FS-Cache facility can have runtime
+debugging enabled by adjusting the value in:
+
+	/sys/module/fscache/parameters/debug
+
+This is a bitmask of debugging streams to enable:
+
+	BIT	VALUE	STREAM				POINT
+	=======	=======	===============================	=======================
+	0	1	Cache management		Function entry trace
+	1	2					Function exit trace
+	2	4					General
+	3	8	Cookie management		Function entry trace
+	4	16					Function exit trace
+	5	32					General
+	6	64	Page handling			Function entry trace
+	7	128					Function exit trace
+	8	256					General
+	9	512	Operation management		Function entry trace
+	10	1024					Function exit trace
+	11	2048					General
+
+The appropriate set of values should be OR'd together and the result written to
+the control file.  For example:
+
+	echo $((1|8|64)) >/sys/module/fscache/parameters/debug
+
+will turn on all function entry debugging.
diff --git a/Documentation/filesystems/caching/netfs-api.txt b/Documentation/filesystems/caching/netfs-api.txt
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..4db125b
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/filesystems/caching/netfs-api.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,778 @@
+			===============================
+			FS-CACHE NETWORK FILESYSTEM API
+			===============================
+
+There's an API by which a network filesystem can make use of the FS-Cache
+facilities.  This is based around a number of principles:
+
+ (1) Caches can store a number of different object types.  There are two main
+     object types: indices and files.  The first is a special type used by
+     FS-Cache to make finding objects faster and to make retiring of groups of
+     objects easier.
+
+ (2) Every index, file or other object is represented by a cookie.  This cookie
+     may or may not have anything associated with it, but the netfs doesn't
+     need to care.
+
+ (3) Barring the top-level index (one entry per cached netfs), the index
+     hierarchy for each netfs is structured according the whim of the netfs.
+
+This API is declared in <linux/fscache.h>.
+
+This document contains the following sections:
+
+	 (1) Network filesystem definition
+	 (2) Index definition
+	 (3) Object definition
+	 (4) Network filesystem (un)registration
+	 (5) Cache tag lookup
+	 (6) Index registration
+	 (7) Data file registration
+	 (8) Miscellaneous object registration
+	 (9) Setting the data file size
+	(10) Page alloc/read/write
+	(11) Page uncaching
+	(12) Index and data file update
+	(13) Miscellaneous cookie operations
+	(14) Cookie unregistration
+	(15) Index and data file invalidation
+	(16) FS-Cache specific page flags.
+
+
+=============================
+NETWORK FILESYSTEM DEFINITION
+=============================
+
+FS-Cache needs a description of the network filesystem.  This is specified
+using a record of the following structure:
+
+	struct fscache_netfs {
+		uint32_t			version;
+		const char			*name;
+		struct fscache_cookie		*primary_index;
+		...
+	};
+
+This first two fields should be filled in before registration, and the third
+will be filled in by the registration function; any other fields should just be
+ignored and are for internal use only.
+
+The fields are:
+
+ (1) The name of the netfs (used as the key in the toplevel index).
+
+ (2) The version of the netfs (if the name matches but the version doesn't, the
+     entire in-cache hierarchy for this netfs will be scrapped and begun
+     afresh).
+
+ (3) The cookie representing the primary index will be allocated according to
+     another parameter passed into the registration function.
+
+For example, kAFS (linux/fs/afs/) uses the following definitions to describe
+itself:
+
+	struct fscache_netfs afs_cache_netfs = {
+		.version	= 0,
+		.name		= "afs",
+	};
+
+
+================
+INDEX DEFINITION
+================
+
+Indices are used for two purposes:
+
+ (1) To aid the finding of a file based on a series of keys (such as AFS's
+     "cell", "volume ID", "vnode ID").
+
+ (2) To make it easier to discard a subset of all the files cached based around
+     a particular key - for instance to mirror the removal of an AFS volume.
+
+However, since it's unlikely that any two netfs's are going to want to define
+their index hierarchies in quite the same way, FS-Cache tries to impose as few
+restraints as possible on how an index is structured and where it is placed in
+the tree.  The netfs can even mix indices and data files at the same level, but
+it's not recommended.
+
+Each index entry consists of a key of indeterminate length plus some auxilliary
+data, also of indeterminate length.
+
+There are some limits on indices:
+
+ (1) Any index containing non-index objects should be restricted to a single
+     cache.  Any such objects created within an index will be created in the
+     first cache only.  The cache in which an index is created can be
+     controlled by cache tags (see below).
+
+ (2) The entry data must be atomically journallable, so it is limited to about
+     400 bytes at present.  At least 400 bytes will be available.
+
+ (3) The depth of the index tree should be judged with care as the search
+     function is recursive.  Too many layers will run the kernel out of stack.
+
+
+=================
+OBJECT DEFINITION
+=================
+
+To define an object, a structure of the following type should be filled out:
+
+	struct fscache_cookie_def
+	{
+		uint8_t name[16];
+		uint8_t type;
+
+		struct fscache_cache_tag *(*select_cache)(
+			const void *parent_netfs_data,
+			const void *cookie_netfs_data);
+
+		uint16_t (*get_key)(const void *cookie_netfs_data,
+				    void *buffer,
+				    uint16_t bufmax);
+
+		void (*get_attr)(const void *cookie_netfs_data,
+				 uint64_t *size);
+
+		uint16_t (*get_aux)(const void *cookie_netfs_data,
+				    void *buffer,
+				    uint16_t bufmax);
+
+		enum fscache_checkaux (*check_aux)(void *cookie_netfs_data,
+						   const void *data,
+						   uint16_t datalen);
+
+		void (*get_context)(void *cookie_netfs_data, void *context);
+
+		void (*put_context)(void *cookie_netfs_data, void *context);
+
+		void (*mark_pages_cached)(void *cookie_netfs_data,
+					  struct address_space *mapping,
+					  struct pagevec *cached_pvec);
+
+		void (*now_uncached)(void *cookie_netfs_data);
+	};
+
+This has the following fields:
+
+ (1) The type of the object [mandatory].
+
+     This is one of the following values:
+
+	(*) FSCACHE_COOKIE_TYPE_INDEX
+
+	    This defines an index, which is a special FS-Cache type.
+
+	(*) FSCACHE_COOKIE_TYPE_DATAFILE
+
+	    This defines an ordinary data file.
+
+	(*) Any other value between 2 and 255
+
+	    This defines an extraordinary object such as an XATTR.
+
+ (2) The name of the object type (NUL terminated unless all 16 chars are used)
+     [optional].
+
+ (3) A function to select the cache in which to store an index [optional].
+
+     This function is invoked when an index needs to be instantiated in a cache
+     during the instantiation of a non-index object.  Only the immediate index
+     parent for the non-index object will be queried.  Any indices above that
+     in the hierarchy may be stored in multiple caches.  This function does not
+     need to be supplied for any non-index object or any index that will only
+     have index children.
+
+     If this function is not supplied or if it returns NULL then the first
+     cache in the parent's list will be chosed, or failing that, the first
+     cache in the master list.
+
+ (4) A function to retrieve an object's key from the netfs [mandatory].
+
+     This function will be called with the netfs data that was passed to the
+     cookie acquisition function and the maximum length of key data that it may
+     provide.  It should write the required key data into the given buffer and
+     return the quantity it wrote.
+
+ (5) A function to retrieve attribute data from the netfs [optional].
+
+     This function will be called with the netfs data that was passed to the
+     cookie acquisition function.  It should return the size of the file if
+     this is a data file.  The size may be used to govern how much cache must
+     be reserved for this file in the cache.
+
+     If the function is absent, a file size of 0 is assumed.
+
+ (6) A function to retrieve auxilliary data from the netfs [optional].
+
+     This function will be called with the netfs data that was passed to the
+     cookie acquisition function and the maximum length of auxilliary data that
+     it may provide.  It should write the auxilliary data into the given buffer
+     and return the quantity it wrote.
+
+     If this function is absent, the auxilliary data length will be set to 0.
+
+     The length of the auxilliary data buffer may be dependent on the key
+     length.  A netfs mustn't rely on being able to provide more than 400 bytes
+     for both.
+
+ (7) A function to check the auxilliary data [optional].
+
+     This function will be called to check that a match found in the cache for
+     this object is valid.  For instance with AFS it could check the auxilliary
+     data against the data version number returned by the server to determine
+     whether the index entry in a cache is still valid.
+
+     If this function is absent, it will be assumed that matching objects in a
+     cache are always valid.
+
+     If present, the function should return one of the following values:
+
+	(*) FSCACHE_CHECKAUX_OKAY		- the entry is okay as is
+	(*) FSCACHE_CHECKAUX_NEEDS_UPDATE	- the entry requires update
+	(*) FSCACHE_CHECKAUX_OBSOLETE		- the entry should be deleted
+
+     This function can also be used to extract data from the auxilliary data in
+     the cache and copy it into the netfs's structures.
+
+ (8) A pair of functions to manage contexts for the completion callback
+     [optional].
+
+     The cache read/write functions are passed a context which is then passed
+     to the I/O completion callback function.  To ensure this context remains
+     valid until after the I/O completion is called, two functions may be
+     provided: one to get an extra reference on the context, and one to drop a
+     reference to it.
+
+     If the context is not used or is a type of object that won't go out of
+     scope, then these functions are not required.  These functions are not
+     required for indices as indices may not contain data.  These functions may
+     be called in interrupt context and so may not sleep.
+
+ (9) A function to mark a page as retaining cache metadata [optional].
+
+     This is called by the cache to indicate that it is retaining in-memory
+     information for this page and that the netfs should uncache the page when
+     it has finished.  This does not indicate whether there's data on the disk
+     or not.  Note that several pages at once may be presented for marking.
+
+     The PG_fscache bit is set on the pages before this function would be
+     called, so the function need not be provided if this is sufficient.
+
+     This function is not required for indices as they're not permitted data.
+
+(10) A function to unmark all the pages retaining cache metadata [mandatory].
+
+     This is called by FS-Cache to indicate that a backing store is being
+     unbound from a cookie and that all the marks on the pages should be
+     cleared to prevent confusion.  Note that the cache will have torn down all
+     its tracking information so that the pages don't need to be explicitly
+     uncached.
+
+     This function is not required for indices as they're not permitted data.
+
+
+===================================
+NETWORK FILESYSTEM (UN)REGISTRATION
+===================================
+
+The first step is to declare the network filesystem to the cache.  This also
+involves specifying the layout of the primary index (for AFS, this would be the
+"cell" level).
+
+The registration function is:
+
+	int fscache_register_netfs(struct fscache_netfs *netfs);
+
+It just takes a pointer to the netfs definition.  It returns 0 or an error as
+appropriate.
+
+For kAFS, registration is done as follows:
+
+	ret = fscache_register_netfs(&afs_cache_netfs);
+
+The last step is, of course, unregistration:
+
+	void fscache_unregister_netfs(struct fscache_netfs *netfs);
+
+
+================
+CACHE TAG LOOKUP
+================
+
+FS-Cache permits the use of more than one cache.  To permit particular index
+subtrees to be bound to particular caches, the second step is to look up cache
+representation tags.  This step is optional; it can be left entirely up to
+FS-Cache as to which cache should be used.  The problem with doing that is that
+FS-Cache will always pick the first cache that was registered.
+
+To get the representation for a named tag:
+
+	struct fscache_cache_tag *fscache_lookup_cache_tag(const char *name);
+
+This takes a text string as the name and returns a representation of a tag.  It
+will never return an error.  It may return a dummy tag, however, if it runs out
+of memory; this will inhibit caching with this tag.
+
+Any representation so obtained must be released by passing it to this function:
+
+	void fscache_release_cache_tag(struct fscache_cache_tag *tag);
+
+The tag will be retrieved by FS-Cache when it calls the object definition
+operation select_cache().
+
+
+==================
+INDEX REGISTRATION
+==================
+
+The third step is to inform FS-Cache about part of an index hierarchy that can
+be used to locate files.  This is done by requesting a cookie for each index in
+the path to the file:
+
+	struct fscache_cookie *
+	fscache_acquire_cookie(struct fscache_cookie *parent,
+			       const struct fscache_object_def *def,
+			       void *netfs_data);
+
+This function creates an index entry in the index represented by parent,
+filling in the index entry by calling the operations pointed to by def.
+
+Note that this function never returns an error - all errors are handled
+internally.  It may, however, return NULL to indicate no cookie.  It is quite
+acceptable to pass this token back to this function as the parent to another
+acquisition (or even to the relinquish cookie, read page and write page
+functions - see below).
+
+Note also that no indices are actually created in a cache until a non-index
+object needs to be created somewhere down the hierarchy.  Furthermore, an index
+may be created in several different caches independently at different times.
+This is all handled transparently, and the netfs doesn't see any of it.
+
+For example, with AFS, a cell would be added to the primary index.  This index
+entry would have a dependent inode containing a volume location index for the
+volume mappings within this cell:
+
+	cell->cache =
+		fscache_acquire_cookie(afs_cache_netfs.primary_index,
+				       &afs_cell_cache_index_def,
+				       cell);
+
+Then when a volume location was accessed, it would be entered into the cell's
+index and an inode would be allocated that acts as a volume type and hash chain
+combination:
+
+	vlocation->cache =
+		fscache_acquire_cookie(cell->cache,
+				       &afs_vlocation_cache_index_def,
+				       vlocation);
+
+And then a particular flavour of volume (R/O for example) could be added to
+that index, creating another index for vnodes (AFS inode equivalents):
+
+	volume->cache =
+		fscache_acquire_cookie(vlocation->cache,
+				       &afs_volume_cache_index_def,
+				       volume);
+
+
+======================
+DATA FILE REGISTRATION
+======================
+
+The fourth step is to request a data file be created in the cache.  This is
+identical to index cookie acquisition.  The only difference is that the type in
+the object definition should be something other than index type.
+
+	vnode->cache =
+		fscache_acquire_cookie(volume->cache,
+				       &afs_vnode_cache_object_def,
+				       vnode);
+
+
+=================================
+MISCELLANEOUS OBJECT REGISTRATION
+=================================
+
+An optional step is to request an object of miscellaneous type be created in
+the cache.  This is almost identical to index cookie acquisition.  The only
+difference is that the type in the object definition should be something other
+than index type.  Whilst the parent object could be an index, it's more likely
+it would be some other type of object such as a data file.
+
+	xattr->cache =
+		fscache_acquire_cookie(vnode->cache,
+				       &afs_xattr_cache_object_def,
+				       xattr);
+
+Miscellaneous objects might be used to store extended attributes or directory
+entries for example.
+
+
+==========================
+SETTING THE DATA FILE SIZE
+==========================
+
+The fifth step is to set the physical attributes of the file, such as its size.
+This doesn't automatically reserve any space in the cache, but permits the
+cache to adjust its metadata for data tracking appropriately:
+
+	int fscache_attr_changed(struct fscache_cookie *cookie);
+
+The cache will return -ENOBUFS if there is no backing cache or if there is no
+space to allocate any extra metadata required in the cache.  The attributes
+will be accessed with the get_attr() cookie definition operation.
+
+Note that attempts to read or write data pages in the cache over this size may
+be rebuffed with -ENOBUFS.
+
+This operation schedules an attribute adjustment to happen asynchronously at
+some point in the future, and as such, it may happen after the function returns
+to the caller.  The attribute adjustment excludes read and write operations.
+
+
+=====================
+PAGE READ/ALLOC/WRITE
+=====================
+
+And the sixth step is to store and retrieve pages in the cache.  There are
+three functions that are used to do this.
+
+Note:
+
+ (1) A page should not be re-read or re-allocated without uncaching it first.
+
+ (2) A read or allocated page must be uncached when the netfs page is released
+     from the pagecache.
+
+ (3) A page should only be written to the cache if previous read or allocated.
+
+This permits the cache to maintain its page tracking in proper order.
+
+
+PAGE READ
+---------
+
+Firstly, the netfs should ask FS-Cache to examine the caches and read the
+contents cached for a particular page of a particular file if present, or else
+allocate space to store the contents if not:
+
+	typedef
+	void (*fscache_rw_complete_t)(struct page *page,
+				      void *context,
+				      int error);
+
+	int fscache_read_or_alloc_page(struct fscache_cookie *cookie,
+				       struct page *page,
+				       fscache_rw_complete_t end_io_func,
+				       void *context,
+				       gfp_t gfp);
+
+The cookie argument must specify a cookie for an object that isn't an index,
+the page specified will have the data loaded into it (and is also used to
+specify the page number), and the gfp argument is used to control how any
+memory allocations made are satisfied.
+
+If the cookie indicates the inode is not cached:
+
+ (1) The function will return -ENOBUFS.
+
+Else if there's a copy of the page resident in the cache:
+
+ (1) The mark_pages_cached() cookie operation will be called on that page.
+
+ (2) The function will submit a request to read the data from the cache's
+     backing device directly into the page specified.
+
+ (3) The function will return 0.
+
+ (4) When the read is complete, end_io_func() will be invoked with:
+
+     (*) The netfs data supplied when the cookie was created.
+
+     (*) The page descriptor.
+
+     (*) The context argument passed to the above function.  This will be
+         maintained with the get_context/put_context functions mentioned above.
+
+     (*) An argument that's 0 on success or negative for an error code.
+
+     If an error occurs, it should be assumed that the page contains no usable
+     data.
+
+     end_io_func() will be called in process context if the read is results in
+     an error, but it might be called in interrupt context if the read is
+     successful.
+
+Otherwise, if there's not a copy available in cache, but the cache may be able
+to store the page:
+
+ (1) The mark_pages_cached() cookie operation will be called on that page.
+
+ (2) A block may be reserved in the cache and attached to the object at the
+     appropriate place.
+
+ (3) The function will return -ENODATA.
+
+This function may also return -ENOMEM or -EINTR, in which case it won't have
+read any data from the cache.
+
+
+PAGE ALLOCATE
+-------------
+
+Alternatively, if there's not expected to be any data in the cache for a page
+because the file has been extended, a block can simply be allocated instead:
+
+	int fscache_alloc_page(struct fscache_cookie *cookie,
+			       struct page *page,
+			       gfp_t gfp);
+
+This is similar to the fscache_read_or_alloc_page() function, except that it
+never reads from the cache.  It will return 0 if a block has been allocated,
+rather than -ENODATA as the other would.  One or the other must be performed
+before writing to the cache.
+
+The mark_pages_cached() cookie operation will be called on the page if
+successful.
+
+
+PAGE WRITE
+----------
+
+Secondly, if the netfs changes the contents of the page (either due to an
+initial download or if a user performs a write), then the page should be
+written back to the cache:
+
+	int fscache_write_page(struct fscache_cookie *cookie,
+			       struct page *page,
+			       gfp_t gfp);
+
+The cookie argument must specify a data file cookie, the page specified should
+contain the data to be written (and is also used to specify the page number),
+and the gfp argument is used to control how any memory allocations made are
+satisfied.
+
+The page must have first been read or allocated successfully and must not have
+been uncached before writing is performed.
+
+If the cookie indicates the inode is not cached then:
+
+ (1) The function will return -ENOBUFS.
+
+Else if space can be allocated in the cache to hold this page:
+
+ (1) PG_fscache_write will be set on the page.
+
+ (2) The function will submit a request to write the data to cache's backing
+     device directly from the page specified.
+
+ (3) The function will return 0.
+
+ (4) When the write is complete PG_fscache_write is cleared on the page and
+     anyone waiting for that bit will be woken up.
+
+Else if there's no space available in the cache, -ENOBUFS will be returned.  It
+is also possible for the PG_fscache_write bit to be cleared when no write took
+place if unforeseen circumstances arose (such as a disk error).
+
+Writing takes place asynchronously.
+
+
+MULTIPLE PAGE READ
+------------------
+
+A facility is provided to read several pages at once, as requested by the
+readpages() address space operation:
+
+	int fscache_read_or_alloc_pages(struct fscache_cookie *cookie,
+					struct address_space *mapping,
+					struct list_head *pages,
+					int *nr_pages,
+					fscache_rw_complete_t end_io_func,
+					void *context,
+					gfp_t gfp);
+
+This works in a similar way to fscache_read_or_alloc_page(), except:
+
+ (1) Any page it can retrieve data for is removed from pages and nr_pages and
+     dispatched for reading to the disk.  Reads of adjacent pages on disk may
+     be merged for greater efficiency.
+
+ (2) The mark_pages_cached() cookie operation will be called on several pages
+     at once if they're being read or allocated.
+
+ (3) If there was an general error, then that error will be returned.
+
+     Else if some pages couldn't be allocated or read, then -ENOBUFS will be
+     returned.
+
+     Else if some pages couldn't be read but were allocated, then -ENODATA will
+     be returned.
+
+     Otherwise, if all pages had reads dispatched, then 0 will be returned, the
+     list will be empty and *nr_pages will be 0.
+
+ (4) end_io_func will be called once for each page being read as the reads
+     complete.  It will be called in process context if error != 0, but it may
+     be called in interrupt context if there is no error.
+
+Note that a return of -ENODATA, -ENOBUFS or any other error does not preclude
+some of the pages being read and some being allocated.  Those pages will have
+been marked appropriately and will need uncaching.
+
+
+==============
+PAGE UNCACHING
+==============
+
+To uncache a page, this function should be called:
+
+	void fscache_uncache_page(struct fscache_cookie *cookie,
+				  struct page *page);
+
+This function permits the cache to release any in-memory representation it
+might be holding for this netfs page.  This function must be called once for
+each page on which the read or write page functions above have been called to
+make sure the cache's in-memory tracking information gets torn down.
+
+Note that pages can't be explicitly deleted from the a data file.  The whole
+data file must be retired (see the relinquish cookie function below).
+
+Furthermore, note that this does not cancel the asynchronous read or write
+operation started by the read/alloc and write functions, so the page
+invalidation and release functions must use:
+
+	bool fscache_check_page_write(struct fscache_cookie *cookie,
+				      struct page *page);
+
+to see if a page is being written to the cache, and:
+
+	void fscache_wait_on_page_write(struct fscache_cookie *cookie,
+					struct page *page);
+
+to wait for it to finish if it is.
+
+
+==========================
+INDEX AND DATA FILE UPDATE
+==========================
+
+To request an update of the index data for an index or other object, the
+following function should be called:
+
+	void fscache_update_cookie(struct fscache_cookie *cookie);
+
+This function will refer back to the netfs_data pointer stored in the cookie by
+the acquisition function to obtain the data to write into each revised index
+entry.  The update method in the parent index definition will be called to
+transfer the data.
+
+Note that partial updates may happen automatically at other times, such as when
+data blocks are added to a data file object.
+
+
+===============================
+MISCELLANEOUS COOKIE OPERATIONS
+===============================
+
+There are a number of operations that can be used to control cookies:
+
+ (*) Cookie pinning:
+
+	int fscache_pin_cookie(struct fscache_cookie *cookie);
+	void fscache_unpin_cookie(struct fscache_cookie *cookie);
+
+     These operations permit data cookies to be pinned into the cache and to
+     have the pinning removed.  They are not permitted on index cookies.
+
+     The pinning function will return 0 if successful, -ENOBUFS in the cookie
+     isn't backed by a cache, -EOPNOTSUPP if the cache doesn't support pinning,
+     -ENOSPC if there isn't enough space to honour the operation, -ENOMEM or
+     -EIO if there's any other problem.
+
+ (*) Data space reservation:
+
+	int fscache_reserve_space(struct fscache_cookie *cookie, loff_t size);
+
+     This permits a netfs to request cache space be reserved to store up to the
+     given amount of a file.  It is permitted to ask for more than the current
+     size of the file to allow for future file expansion.
+
+     If size is given as zero then the reservation will be cancelled.
+
+     The function will return 0 if successful, -ENOBUFS in the cookie isn't
+     backed by a cache, -EOPNOTSUPP if the cache doesn't support reservations,
+     -ENOSPC if there isn't enough space to honour the operation, -ENOMEM or
+     -EIO if there's any other problem.
+
+     Note that this doesn't pin an object in a cache; it can still be culled to
+     make space if it's not in use.
+
+
+=====================
+COOKIE UNREGISTRATION
+=====================
+
+To get rid of a cookie, this function should be called.
+
+	void fscache_relinquish_cookie(struct fscache_cookie *cookie,
+				       int retire);
+
+If retire is non-zero, then the object will be marked for recycling, and all
+copies of it will be removed from all active caches in which it is present.
+Not only that but all child objects will also be retired.
+
+If retire is zero, then the object may be available again when next the
+acquisition function is called.  Retirement here will overrule the pinning on a
+cookie.
+
+One very important note - relinquish must NOT be called for a cookie unless all
+the cookies for "child" indices, objects and pages have been relinquished
+first.
+
+
+================================
+INDEX AND DATA FILE INVALIDATION
+================================
+
+There is no direct way to invalidate an index subtree or a data file.  To do
+this, the caller should relinquish and retire the cookie they have, and then
+acquire a new one.
+
+
+===========================
+FS-CACHE SPECIFIC PAGE FLAG
+===========================
+
+FS-Cache makes use of a page flag, PG_private_2, for its own purpose.  This is
+given the alternative name PG_fscache.
+
+PG_fscache is used to indicate that the page is known by the cache, and that
+the cache must be informed if the page is going to go away.  It's an indication
+to the netfs that the cache has an interest in this page, where an interest may
+be a pointer to it, resources allocated or reserved for it, or I/O in progress
+upon it.
+
+The netfs can use this information in methods such as releasepage() to
+determine whether it needs to uncache a page or update it.
+
+Furthermore, if this bit is set, releasepage() and invalidatepage() operations
+will be called on a page to get rid of it, even if PG_private is not set.  This
+allows caching to attempted on a page before read_cache_pages() to be called
+after fscache_read_or_alloc_pages() as the former will try and release pages it
+was given under certain circumstances.
+
+This bit does not overlap with such as PG_private.  This means that FS-Cache
+can be used with a filesystem that uses the block buffering code.
+
+There are a number of operations defined on this flag:
+
+	int PageFsCache(struct page *page);
+	void SetPageFsCache(struct page *page)
+	void ClearPageFsCache(struct page *page)
+	int TestSetPageFsCache(struct page *page)
+	int TestClearPageFsCache(struct page *page)
+
+These functions are bit test, bit set, bit clear, bit test and set and bit
+test and clear operations on PG_fscache.
diff --git a/Documentation/filesystems/caching/object.txt b/Documentation/filesystems/caching/object.txt
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..e8b0a35
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/filesystems/caching/object.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,313 @@
+	     ====================================================
+	     IN-KERNEL CACHE OBJECT REPRESENTATION AND MANAGEMENT
+	     ====================================================
+
+By: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com>
+
+Contents:
+
+ (*) Representation
+
+ (*) Object management state machine.
+
+     - Provision of cpu time.
+     - Locking simplification.
+
+ (*) The set of states.
+
+ (*) The set of events.
+
+
+==============
+REPRESENTATION
+==============
+
+FS-Cache maintains an in-kernel representation of each object that a netfs is
+currently interested in.  Such objects are represented by the fscache_cookie
+struct and are referred to as cookies.
+
+FS-Cache also maintains a separate in-kernel representation of the objects that
+a cache backend is currently actively caching.  Such objects are represented by
+the fscache_object struct.  The cache backends allocate these upon request, and
+are expected to embed them in their own representations.  These are referred to
+as objects.
+
+There is a 1:N relationship between cookies and objects.  A cookie may be
+represented by multiple objects - an index may exist in more than one cache -
+or even by no objects (it may not be cached).
+
+Furthermore, both cookies and objects are hierarchical.  The two hierarchies
+correspond, but the cookies tree is a superset of the union of the object trees
+of multiple caches:
+
+	    NETFS INDEX TREE               :      CACHE 1     :      CACHE 2
+	                                   :                  :
+	                                   :   +-----------+  :
+	                          +----------->|  IObject  |  :
+	      +-----------+       |        :   +-----------+  :
+	      |  ICookie  |-------+        :         |        :
+	      +-----------+       |        :         |        :   +-----------+
+	            |             +------------------------------>|  IObject  |
+	            |                      :         |        :   +-----------+
+	            |                      :         V        :         |
+	            |                      :   +-----------+  :         |
+	            V             +----------->|  IObject  |  :         |
+	      +-----------+       |        :   +-----------+  :         |
+	      |  ICookie  |-------+        :         |        :         V
+	      +-----------+       |        :         |        :   +-----------+
+	            |             +------------------------------>|  IObject  |
+	      +-----+-----+                :         |        :   +-----------+
+	      |           |                :         |        :         |
+	      V           |                :         V        :         |
+	+-----------+     |                :   +-----------+  :         |
+	|  ICookie  |------------------------->|  IObject  |  :         |
+	+-----------+     |                :   +-----------+  :         |
+	      |           V                :         |        :         V
+	      |     +-----------+          :         |        :   +-----------+
+	      |     |  ICookie  |-------------------------------->|  IObject  |
+	      |     +-----------+          :         |        :   +-----------+
+	      V           |                :         V        :         |
+	+-----------+     |                :   +-----------+  :         |
+	|  DCookie  |------------------------->|  DObject  |  :         |
+	+-----------+     |                :   +-----------+  :         |
+	                  |                :                  :         |
+	          +-------+-------+        :                  :         |
+	          |               |        :                  :         |
+	          V               V        :                  :         V
+	    +-----------+   +-----------+  :                  :   +-----------+
+	    |  DCookie  |   |  DCookie  |------------------------>|  DObject  |
+	    +-----------+   +-----------+  :                  :   +-----------+
+	                                   :                  :
+
+In the above illustration, ICookie and IObject represent indices and DCookie
+and DObject represent data storage objects.  Indices may have representation in
+multiple caches, but currently, non-index objects may not.  Objects of any type
+may also be entirely unrepresented.
+
+As far as the netfs API goes, the netfs is only actually permitted to see
+pointers to the cookies.  The cookies themselves and any objects attached to
+those cookies are hidden from it.
+
+
+===============================
+OBJECT MANAGEMENT STATE MACHINE
+===============================
+
+Within FS-Cache, each active object is managed by its own individual state
+machine.  The state for an object is kept in the fscache_object struct, in
+object->state.  A cookie may point to a set of objects that are in different
+states.
+
+Each state has an action associated with it that is invoked when the machine
+wakes up in that state.  There are four logical sets of states:
+
+ (1) Preparation: states that wait for the parent objects to become ready.  The
+     representations are hierarchical, and it is expected that an object must
+     be created or accessed with respect to its parent object.
+
+ (2) Initialisation: states that perform lookups in the cache and validate
+     what's found and that create on disk any missing metadata.
+
+ (3) Normal running: states that allow netfs operations on objects to proceed
+     and that update the state of objects.
+
+ (4) Termination: states that detach objects from their netfs cookies, that
+     delete objects from disk, that handle disk and system errors and that free
+     up in-memory resources.
+
+
+In most cases, transitioning between states is in response to signalled events.
+When a state has finished processing, it will usually set the mask of events in
+which it is interested (object->event_mask) and relinquish the worker thread.
+Then when an event is raised (by calling fscache_raise_event()), if the event
+is not masked, the object will be queued for processing (by calling
+fscache_enqueue_object()).
+
+
+PROVISION OF CPU TIME
+---------------------
+
+The work to be done by the various states is given CPU time by the threads of
+the slow work facility (see Documentation/slow-work.txt).  This is used in
+preference to the workqueue facility because:
+
+ (1) Threads may be completely occupied for very long periods of time by a
+     particular work item.  These state actions may be doing sequences of
+     synchronous, journalled disk accesses (lookup, mkdir, create, setxattr,
+     getxattr, truncate, unlink, rmdir, rename).
+
+ (2) Threads may do little actual work, but may rather spend a lot of time
+     sleeping on I/O.  This means that single-threaded and 1-per-CPU-threaded
+     workqueues don't necessarily have the right numbers of threads.
+
+
+LOCKING SIMPLIFICATION
+----------------------
+
+Because only one worker thread may be operating on any particular object's
+state machine at once, this simplifies the locking, particularly with respect
+to disconnecting the netfs's representation of a cache object (fscache_cookie)
+from the cache backend's representation (fscache_object) - which may be
+requested from either end.
+
+
+=================
+THE SET OF STATES
+=================
+
+The object state machine has a set of states that it can be in.  There are
+preparation states in which the object sets itself up and waits for its parent
+object to transit to a state that allows access to its children:
+
+ (1) State FSCACHE_OBJECT_INIT.
+
+     Initialise the object and wait for the parent object to become active.  In
+     the cache, it is expected that it will not be possible to look an object
+     up from the parent object, until that parent object itself has been looked
+     up.
+
+There are initialisation states in which the object sets itself up and accesses
+disk for the object metadata:
+
+ (2) State FSCACHE_OBJECT_LOOKING_UP.
+
+     Look up the object on disk, using the parent as a starting point.
+     FS-Cache expects the cache backend to probe the cache to see whether this
+     object is represented there, and if it is, to see if it's valid (coherency
+     management).
+
+     The cache should call fscache_object_lookup_negative() to indicate lookup
+     failure for whatever reason, and should call fscache_obtained_object() to
+     indicate success.
+
+     At the completion of lookup, FS-Cache will let the netfs go ahead with
+     read operations, no matter whether the file is yet cached.  If not yet
+     cached, read operations will be immediately rejected with ENODATA until
+     the first known page is uncached - as to that point there can be no data
+     to be read out of the cache for that file that isn't currently also held
+     in the pagecache.
+
+ (3) State FSCACHE_OBJECT_CREATING.
+
+     Create an object on disk, using the parent as a starting point.  This
+     happens if the lookup failed to find the object, or if the object's
+     coherency data indicated what's on disk is out of date.  In this state,
+     FS-Cache expects the cache to create
+
+     The cache should call fscache_obtained_object() if creation completes
+     successfully, fscache_object_lookup_negative() otherwise.
+
+     At the completion of creation, FS-Cache will start processing write
+     operations the netfs has queued for an object.  If creation failed, the
+     write ops will be transparently discarded, and nothing recorded in the
+     cache.
+
+There are some normal running states in which the object spends its time
+servicing netfs requests:
+
+ (4) State FSCACHE_OBJECT_AVAILABLE.
+
+     A transient state in which pending operations are started, child objects
+     are permitted to advance from FSCACHE_OBJECT_INIT state, and temporary
+     lookup data is freed.
+
+ (5) State FSCACHE_OBJECT_ACTIVE.
+
+     The normal running state.  In this state, requests the netfs makes will be
+     passed on to the cache.
+
+ (6) State FSCACHE_OBJECT_UPDATING.
+
+     The state machine comes here to update the object in the cache from the
+     netfs's records.  This involves updating the auxiliary data that is used
+     to maintain coherency.
+
+And there are terminal states in which an object cleans itself up, deallocates
+memory and potentially deletes stuff from disk:
+
+ (7) State FSCACHE_OBJECT_LC_DYING.
+
+     The object comes here if it is dying because of a lookup or creation
+     error.  This would be due to a disk error or system error of some sort.
+     Temporary data is cleaned up, and the parent is released.
+
+ (8) State FSCACHE_OBJECT_DYING.
+
+     The object comes here if it is dying due to an error, because its parent
+     cookie has been relinquished by the netfs or because the cache is being
+     withdrawn.
+
+     Any child objects waiting on this one are given CPU time so that they too
+     can destroy themselves.  This object waits for all its children to go away
+     before advancing to the next state.
+
+ (9) State FSCACHE_OBJECT_ABORT_INIT.
+
+     The object comes to this state if it was waiting on its parent in
+     FSCACHE_OBJECT_INIT, but its parent died.  The object will destroy itself
+     so that the parent may proceed from the FSCACHE_OBJECT_DYING state.
+
+(10) State FSCACHE_OBJECT_RELEASING.
+(11) State FSCACHE_OBJECT_RECYCLING.
+
+     The object comes to one of these two states when dying once it is rid of
+     all its children, if it is dying because the netfs relinquished its
+     cookie.  In the first state, the cached data is expected to persist, and
+     in the second it will be deleted.
+
+(12) State FSCACHE_OBJECT_WITHDRAWING.
+
+     The object transits to this state if the cache decides it wants to
+     withdraw the object from service, perhaps to make space, but also due to
+     error or just because the whole cache is being withdrawn.
+
+(13) State FSCACHE_OBJECT_DEAD.
+
+     The object transits to this state when the in-memory object record is
+     ready to be deleted.  The object processor shouldn't ever see an object in
+     this state.
+
+
+THE SET OF EVENTS
+-----------------
+
+There are a number of events that can be raised to an object state machine:
+
+ (*) FSCACHE_OBJECT_EV_UPDATE
+
+     The netfs requested that an object be updated.  The state machine will ask
+     the cache backend to update the object, and the cache backend will ask the
+     netfs for details of the change through its cookie definition ops.
+
+ (*) FSCACHE_OBJECT_EV_CLEARED
+
+     This is signalled in two circumstances:
+
+     (a) when an object's last child object is dropped and
+
+     (b) when the last operation outstanding on an object is completed.
+
+     This is used to proceed from the dying state.
+
+ (*) FSCACHE_OBJECT_EV_ERROR
+
+     This is signalled when an I/O error occurs during the processing of some
+     object.
+
+ (*) FSCACHE_OBJECT_EV_RELEASE
+ (*) FSCACHE_OBJECT_EV_RETIRE
+
+     These are signalled when the netfs relinquishes a cookie it was using.
+     The event selected depends on whether the netfs asks for the backing
+     object to be retired (deleted) or retained.
+
+ (*) FSCACHE_OBJECT_EV_WITHDRAW
+
+     This is signalled when the cache backend wants to withdraw an object.
+     This means that the object will have to be detached from the netfs's
+     cookie.
+
+Because the withdrawing releasing/retiring events are all handled by the object
+state machine, it doesn't matter if there's a collision with both ends trying
+to sever the connection at the same time.  The state machine can just pick
+which one it wants to honour, and that effects the other.
diff --git a/Documentation/filesystems/caching/operations.txt b/Documentation/filesystems/caching/operations.txt
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..b6b070c
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/filesystems/caching/operations.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,213 @@
+		       ================================
+		       ASYNCHRONOUS OPERATIONS HANDLING
+		       ================================
+
+By: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com>
+
+Contents:
+
+ (*) Overview.
+
+ (*) Operation record initialisation.
+
+ (*) Parameters.
+
+ (*) Procedure.
+
+ (*) Asynchronous callback.
+
+
+========
+OVERVIEW
+========
+
+FS-Cache has an asynchronous operations handling facility that it uses for its
+data storage and retrieval routines.  Its operations are represented by
+fscache_operation structs, though these are usually embedded into some other
+structure.
+
+This facility is available to and expected to be be used by the cache backends,
+and FS-Cache will create operations and pass them off to the appropriate cache
+backend for completion.
+
+To make use of this facility, <linux/fscache-cache.h> should be #included.
+
+
+===============================
+OPERATION RECORD INITIALISATION
+===============================
+
+An operation is recorded in an fscache_operation struct:
+
+	struct fscache_operation {
+		union {
+			struct work_struct fast_work;
+			struct slow_work slow_work;
+		};
+		unsigned long		flags;
+		fscache_operation_processor_t processor;
+		...
+	};
+
+Someone wanting to issue an operation should allocate something with this
+struct embedded in it.  They should initialise it by calling:
+
+	void fscache_operation_init(struct fscache_operation *op,
+				    fscache_operation_release_t release);
+
+with the operation to be initialised and the release function to use.
+
+The op->flags parameter should be set to indicate the CPU time provision and
+the exclusivity (see the Parameters section).
+
+The op->fast_work, op->slow_work and op->processor flags should be set as
+appropriate for the CPU time provision (see the Parameters section).
+
+FSCACHE_OP_WAITING may be set in op->flags prior to each submission of the
+operation and waited for afterwards.
+
+
+==========
+PARAMETERS
+==========
+
+There are a number of parameters that can be set in the operation record's flag
+parameter.  There are three options for the provision of CPU time in these
+operations:
+
+ (1) The operation may be done synchronously (FSCACHE_OP_MYTHREAD).  A thread
+     may decide it wants to handle an operation itself without deferring it to
+     another thread.
+
+     This is, for example, used in read operations for calling readpages() on
+     the backing filesystem in CacheFiles.  Although readpages() does an
+     asynchronous data fetch, the determination of whether pages exist is done
+     synchronously - and the netfs does not proceed until this has been
+     determined.
+
+     If this option is to be used, FSCACHE_OP_WAITING must be set in op->flags
+     before submitting the operation, and the operating thread must wait for it
+     to be cleared before proceeding:
+
+		wait_on_bit(&op->flags, FSCACHE_OP_WAITING,
+			    fscache_wait_bit, TASK_UNINTERRUPTIBLE);
+
+
+ (2) The operation may be fast asynchronous (FSCACHE_OP_FAST), in which case it
+     will be given to keventd to process.  Such an operation is not permitted
+     to sleep on I/O.
+
+     This is, for example, used by CacheFiles to copy data from a backing fs
+     page to a netfs page after the backing fs has read the page in.
+
+     If this option is used, op->fast_work and op->processor must be
+     initialised before submitting the operation:
+
+		INIT_WORK(&op->fast_work, do_some_work);
+
+
+ (3) The operation may be slow asynchronous (FSCACHE_OP_SLOW), in which case it
+     will be given to the slow work facility to process.  Such an operation is
+     permitted to sleep on I/O.
+
+     This is, for example, used by FS-Cache to handle background writes of
+     pages that have just been fetched from a remote server.
+
+     If this option is used, op->slow_work and op->processor must be
+     initialised before submitting the operation:
+
+		fscache_operation_init_slow(op, processor)
+
+
+Furthermore, operations may be one of two types:
+
+ (1) Exclusive (FSCACHE_OP_EXCLUSIVE).  Operations of this type may not run in
+     conjunction with any other operation on the object being operated upon.
+
+     An example of this is the attribute change operation, in which the file
+     being written to may need truncation.
+
+ (2) Shareable.  Operations of this type may be running simultaneously.  It's
+     up to the operation implementation to prevent interference between other
+     operations running at the same time.
+
+
+=========
+PROCEDURE
+=========
+
+Operations are used through the following procedure:
+
+ (1) The submitting thread must allocate the operation and initialise it
+     itself.  Normally this would be part of a more specific structure with the
+     generic op embedded within.
+
+ (2) The submitting thread must then submit the operation for processing using
+     one of the following two functions:
+
+	int fscache_submit_op(struct fscache_object *object,
+			      struct fscache_operation *op);
+
+	int fscache_submit_exclusive_op(struct fscache_object *object,
+					struct fscache_operation *op);
+
+     The first function should be used to submit non-exclusive ops and the
+     second to submit exclusive ones.  The caller must still set the
+     FSCACHE_OP_EXCLUSIVE flag.
+
+     If successful, both functions will assign the operation to the specified
+     object and return 0.  -ENOBUFS will be returned if the object specified is
+     permanently unavailable.
+
+     The operation manager will defer operations on an object that is still
+     undergoing lookup or creation.  The operation will also be deferred if an
+     operation of conflicting exclusivity is in progress on the object.
+
+     If the operation is asynchronous, the manager will retain a reference to
+     it, so the caller should put their reference to it by passing it to:
+
+	void fscache_put_operation(struct fscache_operation *op);
+
+ (3) If the submitting thread wants to do the work itself, and has marked the
+     operation with FSCACHE_OP_MYTHREAD, then it should monitor
+     FSCACHE_OP_WAITING as described above and check the state of the object if
+     necessary (the object might have died whilst the thread was waiting).
+
+     When it has finished doing its processing, it should call
+     fscache_put_operation() on it.
+
+ (4) The operation holds an effective lock upon the object, preventing other
+     exclusive ops conflicting until it is released.  The operation can be
+     enqueued for further immediate asynchronous processing by adjusting the
+     CPU time provisioning option if necessary, eg:
+
+	op->flags &= ~FSCACHE_OP_TYPE;
+	op->flags |= ~FSCACHE_OP_FAST;
+
+     and calling:
+
+	void fscache_enqueue_operation(struct fscache_operation *op)
+
+     This can be used to allow other things to have use of the worker thread
+     pools.
+
+
+=====================
+ASYNCHRONOUS CALLBACK
+=====================
+
+When used in asynchronous mode, the worker thread pool will invoke the
+processor method with a pointer to the operation.  This should then get at the
+container struct by using container_of():
+
+	static void fscache_write_op(struct fscache_operation *_op)
+	{
+		struct fscache_storage *op =
+			container_of(_op, struct fscache_storage, op);
+	...
+	}
+
+The caller holds a reference on the operation, and will invoke
+fscache_put_operation() when the processor function returns.  The processor
+function is at liberty to call fscache_enqueue_operation() or to take extra
+references.
diff --git a/Documentation/filesystems/exofs.txt b/Documentation/filesystems/exofs.txt
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..0ced74c
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/filesystems/exofs.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,176 @@
+===============================================================================
+WHAT IS EXOFS?
+===============================================================================
+
+exofs is a file system that uses an OSD and exports the API of a normal Linux
+file system. Users access exofs like any other local file system, and exofs
+will in turn issue commands to the local OSD initiator.
+
+OSD is a new T10 command set that views storage devices not as a large/flat
+array of sectors but as a container of objects, each having a length, quota,
+time attributes and more. Each object is addressed by a 64bit ID, and is
+contained in a 64bit ID partition. Each object has associated attributes
+attached to it, which are integral part of the object and provide metadata about
+the object. The standard defines some common obligatory attributes, but user
+attributes can be added as needed.
+
+===============================================================================
+ENVIRONMENT
+===============================================================================
+
+To use this file system, you need to have an object store to run it on.  You
+may download a target from:
+http://open-osd.org
+
+See Documentation/scsi/osd.txt for how to setup a working osd environment.
+
+===============================================================================
+USAGE
+===============================================================================
+
+1. Download and compile exofs and open-osd initiator:
+  You need an external Kernel source tree or kernel headers from your
+  distribution. (anything based on 2.6.26 or later).
+
+  a. download open-osd including exofs source using:
+     [parent-directory]$ git clone git://git.open-osd.org/open-osd.git
+
+  b. Build the library module like this:
+     [parent-directory]$ make -C KSRC=$(KER_DIR) open-osd
+
+     This will build both the open-osd initiator as well as the exofs kernel
+     module. Use whatever parameters you compiled your Kernel with and
+     $(KER_DIR) above pointing to the Kernel you compile against. See the file
+     open-osd/top-level-Makefile for an example.
+
+2. Get the OSD initiator and target set up properly, and login to the target.
+  See Documentation/scsi/osd.txt for farther instructions. Also see ./do-osd
+  for example script that does all these steps.
+
+3. Insmod the exofs.ko module:
+   [exofs]$ insmod exofs.ko
+
+4. Make sure the directory where you want to mount exists. If not, create it.
+   (For example, mkdir /mnt/exofs)
+
+5. At first run you will need to invoke the mkfs.exofs application
+
+   As an example, this will create the file system on:
+   /dev/osd0 partition ID 65536
+
+   mkfs.exofs --pid=65536 --format /dev/osd0
+
+   The --format is optional if not specified no OSD_FORMAT will be
+   preformed and a clean file system will be created in the specified pid,
+   in the available space of the target. (Use --format=size_in_meg to limit
+   the total LUN space available)
+
+   If pid already exist it will be deleted and a new one will be created in it's
+   place. Be careful.
+
+   An exofs lives inside a single OSD partition. You can create multiple exofs
+   filesystems on the same device using multiple pids.
+
+   (run mkfs.exofs without any parameters for usage help message)
+
+6. Mount the file system.
+
+   For example, to mount /dev/osd0, partition ID 0x10000 on /mnt/exofs:
+
+	mount -t exofs -o pid=65536 /dev/osd0 /mnt/exofs/
+
+7. For reference (See do-exofs example script):
+	do-exofs start - an example of how to perform the above steps.
+	do-exofs stop -  an example of how to unmount the file system.
+	do-exofs format - an example of how to format and mkfs a new exofs.
+
+8. Extra compilation flags (uncomment in fs/exofs/Kbuild):
+	CONFIG_EXOFS_DEBUG - for debug messages and extra checks.
+
+===============================================================================
+exofs mount options
+===============================================================================
+Similar to any mount command:
+	mount -t exofs -o exofs_options /dev/osdX mount_exofs_directory
+
+Where:
+    -t exofs: specifies the exofs file system
+
+    /dev/osdX: X is a decimal number. /dev/osdX was created after a successful
+               login into an OSD target.
+
+    mount_exofs_directory: The directory to mount the file system on
+
+    exofs specific options: Options are separated by commas (,)
+		pid=<integer> - The partition number to mount/create as
+                                container of the filesystem.
+                                This option is mandatory
+                to=<integer>  - Timeout in ticks for a single command
+                                default is (60 * HZ) [for debugging only]
+
+===============================================================================
+DESIGN
+===============================================================================
+
+* The file system control block (AKA on-disk superblock) resides in an object
+  with a special ID (defined in common.h).
+  Information included in the file system control block is used to fill the
+  in-memory superblock structure at mount time. This object is created before
+  the file system is used by mkexofs.c It contains information such as:
+	- The file system's magic number
+	- The next inode number to be allocated
+
+* Each file resides in its own object and contains the data (and it will be
+  possible to extend the file over multiple objects, though this has not been
+  implemented yet).
+
+* A directory is treated as a file, and essentially contains a list of <file
+  name, inode #> pairs for files that are found in that directory. The object
+  IDs correspond to the files' inode numbers and will be allocated according to
+  a bitmap (stored in a separate object). Now they are allocated using a
+  counter.
+
+* Each file's control block (AKA on-disk inode) is stored in its object's
+  attributes. This applies to both regular files and other types (directories,
+  device files, symlinks, etc.).
+
+* Credentials are generated per object (inode and superblock) when they is
+  created in memory (read off disk or created). The credential works for all
+  operations and is used as long as the object remains in memory.
+
+* Async OSD operations are used whenever possible, but the target may execute
+  them out of order. The operations that concern us are create, delete,
+  readpage, writepage, update_inode, and truncate. The following pairs of
+  operations should execute in the order written, and we need to prevent them
+  from executing in reverse order:
+	- The following are handled with the OBJ_CREATED and OBJ_2BCREATED
+	  flags. OBJ_CREATED is set when we know the object exists on the OSD -
+	  in create's callback function, and when we successfully do a read_inode.
+	  OBJ_2BCREATED is set in the beginning of the create function, so we
+	  know that we should wait.
+		- create/delete: delete should wait until the object is created
+		  on the OSD.
+		- create/readpage: readpage should be able to return a page
+		  full of zeroes in this case. If there was a write already
+		  en-route (i.e. create, writepage, readpage) then the page
+		  would be locked, and so it would really be the same as
+		  create/writepage.
+		- create/writepage: if writepage is called for a sync write, it
+		  should wait until the object is created on the OSD.
+		  Otherwise, it should just return.
+		- create/truncate: truncate should wait until the object is
+		  created on the OSD.
+		- create/update_inode: update_inode should wait until the
+		  object is created on the OSD.
+	- Handled by VFS locks:
+		- readpage/delete: shouldn't happen because of page lock.
+		- writepage/delete: shouldn't happen because of page lock.
+		- readpage/writepage: shouldn't happen because of page lock.
+
+===============================================================================
+LICENSE/COPYRIGHT
+===============================================================================
+The exofs file system is based on ext2 v0.5b (distributed with the Linux kernel
+version 2.6.10).  All files include the original copyrights, and the license
+is GPL version 2 (only version 2, as is true for the Linux kernel).  The
+Linux kernel can be downloaded from www.kernel.org.
diff --git a/Documentation/filesystems/ext3.txt b/Documentation/filesystems/ext3.txt
index e5f3833..570f9bd 100644
--- a/Documentation/filesystems/ext3.txt
+++ b/Documentation/filesystems/ext3.txt
@@ -14,6 +14,11 @@
 When mounting an ext3 filesystem, the following option are accepted:
 (*) == default
 
+ro			Mount filesystem read only. Note that ext3 will replay
+			the journal (and thus write to the partition) even when
+			mounted "read only". Mount options "ro,noload" can be
+			used to prevent writes to the filesystem.
+
 journal=update		Update the ext3 file system's journal to the current
 			format.
 
@@ -27,7 +32,9 @@
 			identified through its new major/minor numbers encoded
 			in devnum.
 
-noload			Don't load the journal on mounting.
+noload			Don't load the journal on mounting. Note that this forces
+			mount of inconsistent filesystem, which can lead to
+			various problems.
 
 data=journal		All data are committed into the journal prior to being
 			written into the main file system.
@@ -92,9 +99,12 @@
 
 debug			Extra debugging information is sent to syslog.
 
-errors=remount-ro(*)	Remount the filesystem read-only on an error.
+errors=remount-ro	Remount the filesystem read-only on an error.
 errors=continue		Keep going on a filesystem error.
 errors=panic		Panic and halt the machine if an error occurs.
+			(These mount options override the errors behavior
+			specified in the superblock, which can be
+			configured using tune2fs.)
 
 data_err=ignore(*)	Just print an error message if an error occurs
 			in a file data buffer in ordered mode.
diff --git a/Documentation/filesystems/knfsd-stats.txt b/Documentation/filesystems/knfsd-stats.txt
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..64ced51
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/filesystems/knfsd-stats.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,159 @@
+
+Kernel NFS Server Statistics
+============================
+
+This document describes the format and semantics of the statistics
+which the kernel NFS server makes available to userspace.  These
+statistics are available in several text form pseudo files, each of
+which is described separately below.
+
+In most cases you don't need to know these formats, as the nfsstat(8)
+program from the nfs-utils distribution provides a helpful command-line
+interface for extracting and printing them.
+
+All the files described here are formatted as a sequence of text lines,
+separated by newline '\n' characters.  Lines beginning with a hash
+'#' character are comments intended for humans and should be ignored
+by parsing routines.  All other lines contain a sequence of fields
+separated by whitespace.
+
+/proc/fs/nfsd/pool_stats
+------------------------
+
+This file is available in kernels from 2.6.30 onwards, if the
+/proc/fs/nfsd filesystem is mounted (it almost always should be).
+
+The first line is a comment which describes the fields present in
+all the other lines.  The other lines present the following data as
+a sequence of unsigned decimal numeric fields.  One line is shown
+for each NFS thread pool.
+
+All counters are 64 bits wide and wrap naturally.  There is no way
+to zero these counters, instead applications should do their own
+rate conversion.
+
+pool
+	The id number of the NFS thread pool to which this line applies.
+	This number does not change.
+
+	Thread pool ids are a contiguous set of small integers starting
+	at zero.  The maximum value depends on the thread pool mode, but
+	currently cannot be larger than the number of CPUs in the system.
+	Note that in the default case there will be a single thread pool
+	which contains all the nfsd threads and all the CPUs in the system,
+	and thus this file will have a single line with a pool id of "0".
+
+packets-arrived
+	Counts how many NFS packets have arrived.  More precisely, this
+	is the number of times that the network stack has notified the
+	sunrpc server layer that new data may be available on a transport
+	(e.g. an NFS or UDP socket or an NFS/RDMA endpoint).
+
+	Depending on the NFS workload patterns and various network stack
+	effects (such as Large Receive Offload) which can combine packets
+	on the wire, this may be either more or less than the number
+	of NFS calls received (which statistic is available elsewhere).
+	However this is a more accurate and less workload-dependent measure
+	of how much CPU load is being placed on the sunrpc server layer
+	due to NFS network traffic.
+
+sockets-enqueued
+	Counts how many times an NFS transport is enqueued to wait for
+	an nfsd thread to service it, i.e. no nfsd thread was considered
+	available.
+
+	The circumstance this statistic tracks indicates that there was NFS
+	network-facing work to be done but it couldn't be done immediately,
+	thus introducing a small delay in servicing NFS calls.  The ideal
+	rate of change for this counter is zero; significantly non-zero
+	values may indicate a performance limitation.
+
+	This can happen either because there are too few nfsd threads in the
+	thread pool for the NFS workload (the workload is thread-limited),
+	or because the NFS workload needs more CPU time than is available in
+	the thread pool (the workload is CPU-limited).  In the former case,
+	configuring more nfsd threads will probably improve the performance
+	of the NFS workload.  In the latter case, the sunrpc server layer is
+	already choosing not to wake idle nfsd threads because there are too
+	many nfsd threads which want to run but cannot, so configuring more
+	nfsd threads will make no difference whatsoever.  The overloads-avoided
+	statistic (see below) can be used to distinguish these cases.
+
+threads-woken
+	Counts how many times an idle nfsd thread is woken to try to
+	receive some data from an NFS transport.
+
+	This statistic tracks the circumstance where incoming
+	network-facing NFS work is being handled quickly, which is a good
+	thing.  The ideal rate of change for this counter will be close
+	to but less than the rate of change of the packets-arrived counter.
+
+overloads-avoided
+	Counts how many times the sunrpc server layer chose not to wake an
+	nfsd thread, despite the presence of idle nfsd threads, because
+	too many nfsd threads had been recently woken but could not get
+	enough CPU time to actually run.
+
+	This statistic counts a circumstance where the sunrpc layer
+	heuristically avoids overloading the CPU scheduler with too many
+	runnable nfsd threads.  The ideal rate of change for this counter
+	is zero.  Significant non-zero values indicate that the workload
+	is CPU limited.  Usually this is associated with heavy CPU usage
+	on all the CPUs in the nfsd thread pool.
+
+	If a sustained large overloads-avoided rate is detected on a pool,
+	the top(1) utility should be used to check for the following
+	pattern of CPU usage on all the CPUs associated with the given
+	nfsd thread pool.
+
+	 - %us ~= 0 (as you're *NOT* running applications on your NFS server)
+
+	 - %wa ~= 0
+
+	 - %id ~= 0
+
+	 - %sy + %hi + %si ~= 100
+
+	If this pattern is seen, configuring more nfsd threads will *not*
+	improve the performance of the workload.  If this patten is not
+	seen, then something more subtle is wrong.
+
+threads-timedout
+	Counts how many times an nfsd thread triggered an idle timeout,
+	i.e. was not woken to handle any incoming network packets for
+	some time.
+
+	This statistic counts a circumstance where there are more nfsd
+	threads configured than can be used by the NFS workload.  This is
+	a clue that the number of nfsd threads can be reduced without
+	affecting performance.  Unfortunately, it's only a clue and not
+	a strong indication, for a couple of reasons:
+
+	 - Currently the rate at which the counter is incremented is quite
+	   slow; the idle timeout is 60 minutes.  Unless the NFS workload
+	   remains constant for hours at a time, this counter is unlikely
+	   to be providing information that is still useful.
+
+	 - It is usually a wise policy to provide some slack,
+	   i.e. configure a few more nfsds than are currently needed,
+	   to allow for future spikes in load.
+
+
+Note that incoming packets on NFS transports will be dealt with in
+one of three ways.  An nfsd thread can be woken (threads-woken counts
+this case), or the transport can be enqueued for later attention
+(sockets-enqueued counts this case), or the packet can be temporarily
+deferred because the transport is currently being used by an nfsd
+thread.  This last case is not very interesting and is not explicitly
+counted, but can be inferred from the other counters thus:
+
+packets-deferred = packets-arrived - ( sockets-enqueued + threads-woken )
+
+
+More
+----
+Descriptions of the other statistics file should go here.
+
+
+Greg Banks <gnb@sgi.com>
+26 Mar 2009
diff --git a/Documentation/filesystems/nfs41-server.txt b/Documentation/filesystems/nfs41-server.txt
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..05d81cb
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/filesystems/nfs41-server.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,161 @@
+NFSv4.1 Server Implementation
+
+Server support for minorversion 1 can be controlled using the
+/proc/fs/nfsd/versions control file.  The string output returned
+by reading this file will contain either "+4.1" or "-4.1"
+correspondingly.
+
+Currently, server support for minorversion 1 is disabled by default.
+It can be enabled at run time by writing the string "+4.1" to
+the /proc/fs/nfsd/versions control file.  Note that to write this
+control file, the nfsd service must be taken down.  Use your user-mode
+nfs-utils to set this up; see rpc.nfsd(8)
+
+The NFSv4 minorversion 1 (NFSv4.1) implementation in nfsd is based
+on the latest NFSv4.1 Internet Draft:
+http://tools.ietf.org/html/draft-ietf-nfsv4-minorversion1-29
+
+From the many new features in NFSv4.1 the current implementation
+focuses on the mandatory-to-implement NFSv4.1 Sessions, providing
+"exactly once" semantics and better control and throttling of the
+resources allocated for each client.
+
+Other NFSv4.1 features, Parallel NFS operations in particular,
+are still under development out of tree.
+See http://wiki.linux-nfs.org/wiki/index.php/PNFS_prototype_design
+for more information.
+
+The table below, taken from the NFSv4.1 document, lists
+the operations that are mandatory to implement (REQ), optional
+(OPT), and NFSv4.0 operations that are required not to implement (MNI)
+in minor version 1.  The first column indicates the operations that
+are not supported yet by the linux server implementation.
+
+The OPTIONAL features identified and their abbreviations are as follows:
+	pNFS	Parallel NFS
+	FDELG	File Delegations
+	DDELG	Directory Delegations
+
+The following abbreviations indicate the linux server implementation status.
+	I	Implemented NFSv4.1 operations.
+	NS	Not Supported.
+	NS*	unimplemented optional feature.
+	P	pNFS features implemented out of tree.
+	PNS	pNFS features that are not supported yet (out of tree).
+
+Operations
+
+   +----------------------+------------+--------------+----------------+
+   | Operation            | REQ, REC,  | Feature      | Definition     |
+   |                      | OPT, or    | (REQ, REC,   |                |
+   |                      | MNI        | or OPT)      |                |
+   +----------------------+------------+--------------+----------------+
+   | ACCESS               | REQ        |              | Section 18.1   |
+NS | BACKCHANNEL_CTL      | REQ        |              | Section 18.33  |
+NS | BIND_CONN_TO_SESSION | REQ        |              | Section 18.34  |
+   | CLOSE                | REQ        |              | Section 18.2   |
+   | COMMIT               | REQ        |              | Section 18.3   |
+   | CREATE               | REQ        |              | Section 18.4   |
+I  | CREATE_SESSION       | REQ        |              | Section 18.36  |
+NS*| DELEGPURGE           | OPT        | FDELG (REQ)  | Section 18.5   |
+   | DELEGRETURN          | OPT        | FDELG,       | Section 18.6   |
+   |                      |            | DDELG, pNFS  |                |
+   |                      |            | (REQ)        |                |
+NS | DESTROY_CLIENTID     | REQ        |              | Section 18.50  |
+I  | DESTROY_SESSION      | REQ        |              | Section 18.37  |
+I  | EXCHANGE_ID          | REQ        |              | Section 18.35  |
+NS | FREE_STATEID         | REQ        |              | Section 18.38  |
+   | GETATTR              | REQ        |              | Section 18.7   |
+P  | GETDEVICEINFO        | OPT        | pNFS (REQ)   | Section 18.40  |
+P  | GETDEVICELIST        | OPT        | pNFS (OPT)   | Section 18.41  |
+   | GETFH                | REQ        |              | Section 18.8   |
+NS*| GET_DIR_DELEGATION   | OPT        | DDELG (REQ)  | Section 18.39  |
+P  | LAYOUTCOMMIT         | OPT        | pNFS (REQ)   | Section 18.42  |
+P  | LAYOUTGET            | OPT        | pNFS (REQ)   | Section 18.43  |
+P  | LAYOUTRETURN         | OPT        | pNFS (REQ)   | Section 18.44  |
+   | LINK                 | OPT        |              | Section 18.9   |
+   | LOCK                 | REQ        |              | Section 18.10  |
+   | LOCKT                | REQ        |              | Section 18.11  |
+   | LOCKU                | REQ        |              | Section 18.12  |
+   | LOOKUP               | REQ        |              | Section 18.13  |
+   | LOOKUPP              | REQ        |              | Section 18.14  |
+   | NVERIFY              | REQ        |              | Section 18.15  |
+   | OPEN                 | REQ        |              | Section 18.16  |
+NS*| OPENATTR             | OPT        |              | Section 18.17  |
+   | OPEN_CONFIRM         | MNI        |              | N/A            |
+   | OPEN_DOWNGRADE       | REQ        |              | Section 18.18  |
+   | PUTFH                | REQ        |              | Section 18.19  |
+   | PUTPUBFH             | REQ        |              | Section 18.20  |
+   | PUTROOTFH            | REQ        |              | Section 18.21  |
+   | READ                 | REQ        |              | Section 18.22  |
+   | READDIR              | REQ        |              | Section 18.23  |
+   | READLINK             | OPT        |              | Section 18.24  |
+NS | RECLAIM_COMPLETE     | REQ        |              | Section 18.51  |
+   | RELEASE_LOCKOWNER    | MNI        |              | N/A            |
+   | REMOVE               | REQ        |              | Section 18.25  |
+   | RENAME               | REQ        |              | Section 18.26  |
+   | RENEW                | MNI        |              | N/A            |
+   | RESTOREFH            | REQ        |              | Section 18.27  |
+   | SAVEFH               | REQ        |              | Section 18.28  |
+   | SECINFO              | REQ        |              | Section 18.29  |
+NS | SECINFO_NO_NAME      | REC        | pNFS files   | Section 18.45, |
+   |                      |            | layout (REQ) | Section 13.12  |
+I  | SEQUENCE             | REQ        |              | Section 18.46  |
+   | SETATTR              | REQ        |              | Section 18.30  |
+   | SETCLIENTID          | MNI        |              | N/A            |
+   | SETCLIENTID_CONFIRM  | MNI        |              | N/A            |
+NS | SET_SSV              | REQ        |              | Section 18.47  |
+NS | TEST_STATEID         | REQ        |              | Section 18.48  |
+   | VERIFY               | REQ        |              | Section 18.31  |
+NS*| WANT_DELEGATION      | OPT        | FDELG (OPT)  | Section 18.49  |
+   | WRITE                | REQ        |              | Section 18.32  |
+
+Callback Operations
+
+   +-------------------------+-----------+-------------+---------------+
+   | Operation               | REQ, REC, | Feature     | Definition    |
+   |                         | OPT, or   | (REQ, REC,  |               |
+   |                         | MNI       | or OPT)     |               |
+   +-------------------------+-----------+-------------+---------------+
+   | CB_GETATTR              | OPT       | FDELG (REQ) | Section 20.1  |
+P  | CB_LAYOUTRECALL         | OPT       | pNFS (REQ)  | Section 20.3  |
+NS*| CB_NOTIFY               | OPT       | DDELG (REQ) | Section 20.4  |
+P  | CB_NOTIFY_DEVICEID      | OPT       | pNFS (OPT)  | Section 20.12 |
+NS*| CB_NOTIFY_LOCK          | OPT       |             | Section 20.11 |
+NS*| CB_PUSH_DELEG           | OPT       | FDELG (OPT) | Section 20.5  |
+   | CB_RECALL               | OPT       | FDELG,      | Section 20.2  |
+   |                         |           | DDELG, pNFS |               |
+   |                         |           | (REQ)       |               |
+NS*| CB_RECALL_ANY           | OPT       | FDELG,      | Section 20.6  |
+   |                         |           | DDELG, pNFS |               |
+   |                         |           | (REQ)       |               |
+NS | CB_RECALL_SLOT          | REQ       |             | Section 20.8  |
+NS*| CB_RECALLABLE_OBJ_AVAIL | OPT       | DDELG, pNFS | Section 20.7  |
+   |                         |           | (REQ)       |               |
+I  | CB_SEQUENCE             | OPT       | FDELG,      | Section 20.9  |
+   |                         |           | DDELG, pNFS |               |
+   |                         |           | (REQ)       |               |
+NS*| CB_WANTS_CANCELLED      | OPT       | FDELG,      | Section 20.10 |
+   |                         |           | DDELG, pNFS |               |
+   |                         |           | (REQ)       |               |
+   +-------------------------+-----------+-------------+---------------+
+
+Implementation notes:
+
+EXCHANGE_ID:
+* only SP4_NONE state protection supported
+* implementation ids are ignored
+
+CREATE_SESSION:
+* backchannel attributes are ignored
+* backchannel security parameters are ignored
+
+SEQUENCE:
+* no support for dynamic slot table renegotiation (optional)
+
+nfsv4.1 COMPOUND rules:
+The following cases aren't supported yet:
+* Enforcing of NFS4ERR_NOT_ONLY_OP for: BIND_CONN_TO_SESSION, CREATE_SESSION,
+  DESTROY_CLIENTID, DESTROY_SESSION, EXCHANGE_ID.
+* DESTROY_SESSION MUST be the final operation in the COMPOUND request.
+
diff --git a/Documentation/filesystems/nilfs2.txt b/Documentation/filesystems/nilfs2.txt
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..55c4300
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/filesystems/nilfs2.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,200 @@
+NILFS2
+------
+
+NILFS2 is a log-structured file system (LFS) supporting continuous
+snapshotting.  In addition to versioning capability of the entire file
+system, users can even restore files mistakenly overwritten or
+destroyed just a few seconds ago.  Since NILFS2 can keep consistency
+like conventional LFS, it achieves quick recovery after system
+crashes.
+
+NILFS2 creates a number of checkpoints every few seconds or per
+synchronous write basis (unless there is no change).  Users can select
+significant versions among continuously created checkpoints, and can
+change them into snapshots which will be preserved until they are
+changed back to checkpoints.
+
+There is no limit on the number of snapshots until the volume gets
+full.  Each snapshot is mountable as a read-only file system
+concurrently with its writable mount, and this feature is convenient
+for online backup.
+
+The userland tools are included in nilfs-utils package, which is
+available from the following download page.  At least "mkfs.nilfs2",
+"mount.nilfs2", "umount.nilfs2", and "nilfs_cleanerd" (so called
+cleaner or garbage collector) are required.  Details on the tools are
+described in the man pages included in the package.
+
+Project web page:    http://www.nilfs.org/en/
+Download page:       http://www.nilfs.org/en/download.html
+Git tree web page:   http://www.nilfs.org/git/
+NILFS mailing lists: http://www.nilfs.org/mailman/listinfo/users
+
+Caveats
+=======
+
+Features which NILFS2 does not support yet:
+
+	- atime
+	- extended attributes
+	- POSIX ACLs
+	- quotas
+	- writable snapshots
+	- remote backup (CDP)
+	- data integrity
+	- defragmentation
+
+Mount options
+=============
+
+NILFS2 supports the following mount options:
+(*) == default
+
+barrier=on(*)		This enables/disables barriers. barrier=off disables
+			it, barrier=on enables it.
+errors=continue(*)	Keep going on a filesystem error.
+errors=remount-ro	Remount the filesystem read-only on an error.
+errors=panic		Panic and halt the machine if an error occurs.
+cp=n			Specify the checkpoint-number of the snapshot to be
+			mounted.  Checkpoints and snapshots are listed by lscp
+			user command.  Only the checkpoints marked as snapshot
+			are mountable with this option.  Snapshot is read-only,
+			so a read-only mount option must be specified together.
+order=relaxed(*)	Apply relaxed order semantics that allows modified data
+			blocks to be written to disk without making a
+			checkpoint if no metadata update is going.  This mode
+			is equivalent to the ordered data mode of the ext3
+			filesystem except for the updates on data blocks still
+			conserve atomicity.  This will improve synchronous
+			write performance for overwriting.
+order=strict		Apply strict in-order semantics that preserves sequence
+			of all file operations including overwriting of data
+			blocks.  That means, it is guaranteed that no
+			overtaking of events occurs in the recovered file
+			system after a crash.
+
+NILFS2 usage
+============
+
+To use nilfs2 as a local file system, simply:
+
+ # mkfs -t nilfs2 /dev/block_device
+ # mount -t nilfs2 /dev/block_device /dir
+
+This will also invoke the cleaner through the mount helper program
+(mount.nilfs2).
+
+Checkpoints and snapshots are managed by the following commands.
+Their manpages are included in the nilfs-utils package above.
+
+  lscp     list checkpoints or snapshots.
+  mkcp     make a checkpoint or a snapshot.
+  chcp     change an existing checkpoint to a snapshot or vice versa.
+  rmcp     invalidate specified checkpoint(s).
+
+To mount a snapshot,
+
+ # mount -t nilfs2 -r -o cp=<cno> /dev/block_device /snap_dir
+
+where <cno> is the checkpoint number of the snapshot.
+
+To unmount the NILFS2 mount point or snapshot, simply:
+
+ # umount /dir
+
+Then, the cleaner daemon is automatically shut down by the umount
+helper program (umount.nilfs2).
+
+Disk format
+===========
+
+A nilfs2 volume is equally divided into a number of segments except
+for the super block (SB) and segment #0.  A segment is the container
+of logs.  Each log is composed of summary information blocks, payload
+blocks, and an optional super root block (SR):
+
+   ______________________________________________________
+  | |SB| | Segment | Segment | Segment | ... | Segment | |
+  |_|__|_|____0____|____1____|____2____|_____|____N____|_|
+  0 +1K +4K       +8M       +16M      +24M  +(8MB x N)
+       .             .            (Typical offsets for 4KB-block)
+    .                  .
+  .______________________.
+  | log | log |... | log |
+  |__1__|__2__|____|__m__|
+        .       .
+      .               .
+    .                       .
+  .______________________________.
+  | Summary | Payload blocks  |SR|
+  |_blocks__|_________________|__|
+
+The payload blocks are organized per file, and each file consists of
+data blocks and B-tree node blocks:
+
+    |<---       File-A        --->|<---       File-B        --->|
+   _______________________________________________________________
+    | Data blocks | B-tree blocks | Data blocks | B-tree blocks | ...
+   _|_____________|_______________|_____________|_______________|_
+
+
+Since only the modified blocks are written in the log, it may have
+files without data blocks or B-tree node blocks.
+
+The organization of the blocks is recorded in the summary information
+blocks, which contains a header structure (nilfs_segment_summary), per
+file structures (nilfs_finfo), and per block structures (nilfs_binfo):
+
+  _________________________________________________________________________
+ | Summary | finfo | binfo | ... | binfo | finfo | binfo | ... | binfo |...
+ |_blocks__|___A___|_(A,1)_|_____|(A,Na)_|___B___|_(B,1)_|_____|(B,Nb)_|___
+
+
+The logs include regular files, directory files, symbolic link files
+and several meta data files.  The mata data files are the files used
+to maintain file system meta data.  The current version of NILFS2 uses
+the following meta data files:
+
+ 1) Inode file (ifile)             -- Stores on-disk inodes
+ 2) Checkpoint file (cpfile)       -- Stores checkpoints
+ 3) Segment usage file (sufile)    -- Stores allocation state of segments
+ 4) Data address translation file  -- Maps virtual block numbers to usual
+    (DAT)                             block numbers.  This file serves to
+                                      make on-disk blocks relocatable.
+
+The following figure shows a typical organization of the logs:
+
+  _________________________________________________________________________
+ | Summary | regular file | file  | ... | ifile | cpfile | sufile | DAT |SR|
+ |_blocks__|_or_directory_|_______|_____|_______|________|________|_____|__|
+
+
+To stride over segment boundaries, this sequence of files may be split
+into multiple logs.  The sequence of logs that should be treated as
+logically one log, is delimited with flags marked in the segment
+summary.  The recovery code of nilfs2 looks this boundary information
+to ensure atomicity of updates.
+
+The super root block is inserted for every checkpoints.  It includes
+three special inodes, inodes for the DAT, cpfile, and sufile.  Inodes
+of regular files, directories, symlinks and other special files, are
+included in the ifile.  The inode of ifile itself is included in the
+corresponding checkpoint entry in the cpfile.  Thus, the hierarchy
+among NILFS2 files can be depicted as follows:
+
+  Super block (SB)
+       |
+       v
+  Super root block (the latest cno=xx)
+       |-- DAT
+       |-- sufile
+       `-- cpfile
+              |-- ifile (cno=c1)
+              |-- ifile (cno=c2) ---- file (ino=i1)
+              :        :          |-- file (ino=i2)
+              `-- ifile (cno=xx)  |-- file (ino=i3)
+                                  :        :
+                                  `-- file (ino=yy)
+                                    ( regular file, directory, or symlink )
+
+For detail on the format of each file, please see include/linux/nilfs2_fs.h.
diff --git a/Documentation/filesystems/pohmelfs/design_notes.txt b/Documentation/filesystems/pohmelfs/design_notes.txt
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..6d6db60
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/filesystems/pohmelfs/design_notes.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,70 @@
+POHMELFS: Parallel Optimized Host Message Exchange Layered File System.
+
+		Evgeniy Polyakov <zbr@ioremap.net>
+
+Homepage: http://www.ioremap.net/projects/pohmelfs
+
+POHMELFS first began as a network filesystem with coherent local data and
+metadata caches but is now evolving into a parallel distributed filesystem.
+
+Main features of this FS include:
+ * Locally coherent cache for data and metadata with (potentially) byte-range locks.
+	Since all Linux filesystems lock the whole inode during writing, algorithm
+	is very simple and does not use byte-ranges, although they are sent in
+	locking messages.
+ * Completely async processing of all events except creation of hard and symbolic
+	links, and rename events.
+	Object creation and data reading and writing are processed asynchronously.
+ * Flexible object architecture optimized for network processing.
+	Ability to create long paths to objects and remove arbitrarily huge
+	directories with a single network command.
+	(like removing the whole kernel tree via a single network command).
+ * Very high performance.
+ * Fast and scalable multithreaded userspace server. Being in userspace it works
+	with any underlying filesystem and still is much faster than async in-kernel NFS one.
+ * Client is able to switch between different servers (if one goes down, client
+	automatically reconnects to second and so on).
+ * Transactions support. Full failover for all operations.
+	Resending transactions to different servers on timeout or error.
+ * Read request (data read, directory listing, lookup requests) balancing between multiple servers.
+ * Write requests are replicated to multiple servers and completed only when all of them are acked.
+ * Ability to add and/or remove servers from the working set at run-time.
+ * Strong authentification and possible data encryption in network channel.
+ * Extended attributes support.
+
+POHMELFS is based on transactions, which are potentially long-standing objects that live
+in the client's memory. Each transaction contains all the information needed to process a given
+command (or set of commands, which is frequently used during data writing: single transactions
+can contain creation and data writing commands). Transactions are committed by all the servers
+to which they are sent and, in case of failures, are eventually resent or dropped with an error.
+For example, reading will return an error if no servers are available.
+
+POHMELFS uses a asynchronous approach to data processing. Courtesy of transactions, it is
+possible to detach replies from requests and, if the command requires data to be received, the
+caller sleeps waiting for it. Thus, it is possible to issue multiple read commands to different
+servers and async threads will pick up replies in parallel, find appropriate transactions in the
+system and put the data where it belongs (like the page or inode cache).
+
+The main feature of POHMELFS is writeback data and the metadata cache.
+Only a few non-performance critical operations use the write-through cache and
+are synchronous: hard and symbolic link creation, and object rename. Creation,
+removal of objects and data writing are asynchronous and are sent to
+the server during system writeback. Only one writer at a time is allowed for any
+given inode, which is guarded by an appropriate locking protocol.
+Because of this feature, POHMELFS is extremely fast at metadata intensive
+workloads and can fully utilize the bandwidth to the servers when doing bulk
+data transfers.
+
+POHMELFS clients operate with a working set of servers and are capable of balancing read-only
+operations (like lookups or directory listings) between them.
+Administrators can add or remove servers from the set at run-time via special commands (described
+in Documentation/pohmelfs/info.txt file). Writes are replicated to all servers.
+
+POHMELFS is capable of full data channel encryption and/or strong crypto hashing.
+One can select any kernel supported cipher, encryption mode, hash type and operation mode
+(hmac or digest). It is also possible to use both or neither (default). Crypto configuration
+is checked during mount time and, if the server does not support it, appropriate capabilities
+will be disabled or mount will fail (if 'crypto_fail_unsupported' mount option is specified).
+Crypto performance heavily depends on the number of crypto threads, which asynchronously perform
+crypto operations and send the resulting data to server or submit it up the stack. This number
+can be controlled via a mount option.
diff --git a/Documentation/filesystems/pohmelfs/info.txt b/Documentation/filesystems/pohmelfs/info.txt
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..4e3d501
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/filesystems/pohmelfs/info.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,86 @@
+POHMELFS usage information.
+
+Mount options:
+idx=%u
+ Each mountpoint is associated with a special index via this option.
+ Administrator can add or remove servers from the given index, so all mounts,
+ which were attached to it, are updated.
+ Default it is 0.
+
+trans_scan_timeout=%u
+ This timeout, expressed in milliseconds, specifies time to scan transaction
+ trees looking for stale requests, which have to be resent, or if number of
+ retries exceed specified limit, dropped with error.
+ Default is 5 seconds.
+
+drop_scan_timeout=%u
+ Internal timeout, expressed in milliseconds, which specifies how frequently
+ inodes marked to be dropped are freed. It also specifies how frequently
+ the system checks that servers have to be added or removed from current working set.
+ Default is 1 second.
+
+wait_on_page_timeout=%u
+ Number of milliseconds to wait for reply from remote server for data reading command.
+ If this timeout is exceeded, reading returns an error.
+ Default is 5 seconds.
+
+trans_retries=%u
+ This is the number of times that a transaction will be resent to a server that did
+ not answer for the last @trans_scan_timeout milliseconds.
+ When the number of resends exceeds this limit, the transaction is completed with error.
+ Default is 5 resends.
+
+crypto_thread_num=%u
+ Number of crypto processing threads. Threads are used both for RX and TX traffic.
+ Default is 2, or no threads if crypto operations are not supported.
+
+trans_max_pages=%u
+ Maximum number of pages in a single transaction. This parameter also controls
+ the number of pages,  allocated for crypto processing (each crypto thread has
+ pool of pages, the number of which is equal to 'trans_max_pages'.
+ Default is 100 pages.
+
+crypto_fail_unsupported
+ If specified, mount will fail if the server does not support requested crypto operations.
+ By default mount will disable non-matching crypto operations.
+
+mcache_timeout=%u
+ Maximum number of milliseconds to wait for the mcache objects to be processed.
+ Mcache includes locks (given lock should be granted by server), attributes (they should be
+ fully received in the given timeframe).
+ Default is 5 seconds.
+
+Usage examples.
+
+Add (or remove if it already exists) server server1.net:1025 into the working set with index $idx
+with appropriate hash algorithm and key file and cipher algorithm, mode and key file:
+$cfg -a server1.net -p 1025 -i $idx -K $hash_key -k $cipher_key
+
+Mount filesystem with given index $idx to /mnt mountpoint.
+Client will connect to all servers specified in the working set via previous command:
+mount -t pohmel -o idx=$idx q /mnt
+
+One can add or remove servers from working set after mounting too.
+
+
+Server installation.
+
+Creating a server, which listens at port 1025 and 0.0.0.0 address.
+Working root directory (note, that server chroots there, so you have to have appropriate permissions)
+is set to /mnt, server will negotiate hash/cipher with client, in case client requested it, there
+are appropriate key files.
+Number of working threads is set to 10.
+
+# ./fserver -a 0.0.0.0 -p 1025 -r /mnt -w 10 -K hash_key -k cipher_key
+
+ -A 6			 - listen on ipv6 address. Default: Disabled.
+ -r root                 - path to root directory. Default: /tmp.
+ -a addr                 - listen address. Default: 0.0.0.0.
+ -p port                 - listen port. Default: 1025.
+ -w workers              - number of workers per connected client. Default: 1.
+ -K file		 - hash key size. Default: none.
+ -k file		 - cipher key size. Default: none.
+ -h                      - this help.
+
+Number of worker threads specifies how many workers will be created for each client.
+Bulk single-client transafers usually are better handled with smaller number (like 1-3).
diff --git a/Documentation/filesystems/pohmelfs/network_protocol.txt b/Documentation/filesystems/pohmelfs/network_protocol.txt
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..40ea6c2
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/filesystems/pohmelfs/network_protocol.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,227 @@
+POHMELFS network protocol.
+
+Basic structure used in network communication is following command:
+
+struct netfs_cmd
+{
+	__u16			cmd;	/* Command number */
+	__u16			csize;	/* Attached crypto information size */
+	__u16			cpad;	/* Attached padding size */
+	__u16			ext;	/* External flags */
+	__u32			size;	/* Size of the attached data */
+	__u32			trans;	/* Transaction id */
+	__u64			id;	/* Object ID to operate on. Used for feedback.*/
+	__u64			start;	/* Start of the object. */
+	__u64			iv;	/* IV sequence */
+	__u8			data[0];
+};
+
+Commands can be embedded into transaction command (which in turn has own command),
+so one can extend protocol as needed without breaking backward compatibility as long
+as old commands are supported. All string lengths include tail 0 byte.
+
+All commans are transfered over the network in big-endian. CPU endianess is used at the end peers.
+
+@cmd - command number, which specifies command to be processed. Following
+	commands are used currently:
+
+	NETFS_READDIR	= 1,	/* Read directory for given inode number */
+	NETFS_READ_PAGE,	/* Read data page from the server */
+	NETFS_WRITE_PAGE,	/* Write data page to the server */
+	NETFS_CREATE,		/* Create directory entry */
+	NETFS_REMOVE,		/* Remove directory entry */
+	NETFS_LOOKUP,		/* Lookup single object */
+	NETFS_LINK,		/* Create a link */
+	NETFS_TRANS,		/* Transaction */
+	NETFS_OPEN,		/* Open intent */
+	NETFS_INODE_INFO,	/* Metadata cache coherency synchronization message */
+	NETFS_PAGE_CACHE,	/* Page cache invalidation message */
+	NETFS_READ_PAGES,	/* Read multiple contiguous pages in one go */
+	NETFS_RENAME,		/* Rename object */
+	NETFS_CAPABILITIES,	/* Capabilities of the client, for example supported crypto */
+	NETFS_LOCK,		/* Distributed lock message */
+	NETFS_XATTR_SET,	/* Set extended attribute */
+	NETFS_XATTR_GET,	/* Get extended attribute */
+
+@ext - external flags. Used by different commands to specify some extra arguments
+	like partial size of the embedded objects or creation flags.
+
+@size - size of the attached data. For NETFS_READ_PAGE and NETFS_READ_PAGES no data is attached,
+	but size of the requested data is incorporated here. It does not include size of the command
+	header (struct netfs_cmd) itself.
+
+@id - id of the object this command operates on. Each command can use it for own purpose.
+
+@start - start of the object this command operates on. Each command can use it for own purpose.
+
+@csize, @cpad - size and padding size of the (attached if needed) crypto information.
+
+Command specifications.
+
+@NETFS_READDIR
+This command is used to sync content of the remote dir to the client.
+
+@ext - length of the path to object.
+@size - the same.
+@id - local inode number of the directory to read.
+@start - zero.
+
+
+@NETFS_READ_PAGE
+This command is used to read data from remote server.
+Data size does not exceed local page cache size.
+
+@id - inode number.
+@start - first byte offset.
+@size - number of bytes to read plus length of the path to object.
+@ext - object path length.
+
+
+@NETFS_CREATE
+Used to create object.
+It does not require that all directories on top of the object were
+already created, it will create them automatically. Each object has
+associated @netfs_path_entry data structure, which contains creation
+mode (permissions and type) and length of the name as long as name itself.
+
+@start - 0
+@size - size of the all data structures needed to create a path
+@id - local inode number
+@ext - 0
+
+
+@NETFS_REMOVE
+Used to remove object.
+
+@ext - length of the path to object.
+@size - the same.
+@id - local inode number.
+@start - zero.
+
+
+@NETFS_LOOKUP
+Lookup information about object on server.
+
+@ext - length of the path to object.
+@size - the same.
+@id - local inode number of the directory to look object in.
+@start - local inode number of the object to look at.
+
+
+@NETFS_LINK
+Create hard of symlink.
+Command is sent as "object_path|target_path".
+
+@size - size of the above string.
+@id - parent local inode number.
+@start - 1 for symlink, 0 for hardlink.
+@ext - size of the "object_path" above.
+
+
+@NETFS_TRANS
+Transaction header.
+
+@size - incorporates all embedded command sizes including theirs header sizes.
+@start - transaction generation number - unique id used to find transaction.
+@ext - transaction flags. Unused at the moment.
+@id - 0.
+
+
+@NETFS_OPEN
+Open intent for given transaction.
+
+@id - local inode number.
+@start - 0.
+@size - path length to the object.
+@ext - open flags (O_RDWR and so on).
+
+
+@NETFS_INODE_INFO
+Metadata update command.
+It is sent to servers when attributes of the object are changed and received
+when data or metadata were updated. It operates with the following structure:
+
+struct netfs_inode_info
+{
+	unsigned int		mode;
+	unsigned int		nlink;
+	unsigned int		uid;
+	unsigned int		gid;
+	unsigned int		blocksize;
+	unsigned int		padding;
+	__u64			ino;
+	__u64			blocks;
+	__u64			rdev;
+	__u64			size;
+	__u64			version;
+};
+
+It effectively mirrors stat(2) returned data.
+
+
+@ext - path length to the object.
+@size - the same plus size of the netfs_inode_info structure.
+@id - local inode number.
+@start - 0.
+
+
+@NETFS_PAGE_CACHE
+Command is only received by clients. It contains information about
+page to be marked as not up-to-date.
+
+@id - client's inode number.
+@start - last byte of the page to be invalidated. If it is not equal to
+	current inode size, it will be vmtruncated().
+@size - 0
+@ext - 0
+
+
+@NETFS_READ_PAGES
+Used to read multiple contiguous pages in one go.
+
+@start - first byte of the contiguous region to read.
+@size - contains of two fields: lower 8 bits are used to represent page cache shift
+	used by client, another 3 bytes are used to get number of pages.
+@id - local inode number.
+@ext - path length to the object.
+
+
+@NETFS_RENAME
+Used to rename object.
+Attached data is formed into following string: "old_path|new_path".
+
+@id - local inode number.
+@start - parent inode number.
+@size - length of the above string.
+@ext - length of the old path part.
+
+
+@NETFS_CAPABILITIES
+Used to exchange crypto capabilities with server.
+If crypto capabilities are not supported by server, then client will disable it
+or fail (if 'crypto_fail_unsupported' mount options was specified).
+
+@id - superblock index. Used to specify crypto information for group of servers.
+@size - size of the attached capabilities structure.
+@start - 0.
+@size - 0.
+@scsize - 0.
+
+@NETFS_LOCK
+Used to send lock request/release messages. Although it sends byte range request
+and is capable of flushing pages based on that, it is not used, since all Linux
+filesystems lock the whole inode.
+
+@id - lock generation number.
+@start - start of the locked range.
+@size - size of the locked range.
+@ext - lock type: read/write. Not used actually. 15'th bit is used to determine,
+	if it is lock request (1) or release (0).
+
+@NETFS_XATTR_SET
+@NETFS_XATTR_GET
+Used to set/get extended attributes for given inode.
+@id - attribute generation number or xattr setting type
+@start - size of the attribute (request or attached)
+@size - name length, path len and data size for given attribute
+@ext - path length for given object
diff --git a/Documentation/filesystems/udf.txt b/Documentation/filesystems/udf.txt
index fde829a..902b95d 100644
--- a/Documentation/filesystems/udf.txt
+++ b/Documentation/filesystems/udf.txt
@@ -24,6 +24,8 @@
 
 	gid=		Set the default group.
 	umask=		Set the default umask.
+	mode=		Set the default file permissions.
+	dmode=		Set the default directory permissions.
 	uid=		Set the default user.
 	bs=		Set the block size.
 	unhide		Show otherwise hidden files.
diff --git a/Documentation/ftrace.txt b/Documentation/ftrace.txt
deleted file mode 100644
index 803b131..0000000
--- a/Documentation/ftrace.txt
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,1424 +0,0 @@
-		ftrace - Function Tracer
-		========================
-
-Copyright 2008 Red Hat Inc.
-   Author:   Steven Rostedt <srostedt@redhat.com>
-  License:   The GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2
-               (dual licensed under the GPL v2)
-Reviewers:   Elias Oltmanns, Randy Dunlap, Andrew Morton,
-	     John Kacur, and David Teigland.
-
-Written for: 2.6.28-rc2
-
-Introduction
-------------
-
-Ftrace is an internal tracer designed to help out developers and
-designers of systems to find what is going on inside the kernel.
-It can be used for debugging or analyzing latencies and performance
-issues that take place outside of user-space.
-
-Although ftrace is the function tracer, it also includes an
-infrastructure that allows for other types of tracing. Some of the
-tracers that are currently in ftrace include a tracer to trace
-context switches, the time it takes for a high priority task to
-run after it was woken up, the time interrupts are disabled, and
-more (ftrace allows for tracer plugins, which means that the list of
-tracers can always grow).
-
-
-The File System
----------------
-
-Ftrace uses the debugfs file system to hold the control files as well
-as the files to display output.
-
-To mount the debugfs system:
-
-  # mkdir /debug
-  # mount -t debugfs nodev /debug
-
-(Note: it is more common to mount at /sys/kernel/debug, but for simplicity
- this document will use /debug)
-
-That's it! (assuming that you have ftrace configured into your kernel)
-
-After mounting the debugfs, you can see a directory called
-"tracing".  This directory contains the control and output files
-of ftrace. Here is a list of some of the key files:
-
-
- Note: all time values are in microseconds.
-
-  current_tracer: This is used to set or display the current tracer
-		that is configured.
-
-  available_tracers: This holds the different types of tracers that
-		have been compiled into the kernel. The tracers
-		listed here can be configured by echoing their name
-		into current_tracer.
-
-  tracing_enabled: This sets or displays whether the current_tracer
-		is activated and tracing or not. Echo 0 into this
-		file to disable the tracer or 1 to enable it.
-
-  trace: This file holds the output of the trace in a human readable
-		format (described below).
-
-  latency_trace: This file shows the same trace but the information
-		is organized more to display possible latencies
-		in the system (described below).
-
-  trace_pipe: The output is the same as the "trace" file but this
-		file is meant to be streamed with live tracing.
-		Reads from this file will block until new data
-		is retrieved. Unlike the "trace" and "latency_trace"
-		files, this file is a consumer. This means reading
-		from this file causes sequential reads to display
-		more current data. Once data is read from this
-		file, it is consumed, and will not be read
-		again with a sequential read. The "trace" and
-		"latency_trace" files are static, and if the
-		tracer is not adding more data, they will display
-		the same information every time they are read.
-
-  trace_options: This file lets the user control the amount of data
-		that is displayed in one of the above output
-		files.
-
-  trace_max_latency: Some of the tracers record the max latency.
-		For example, the time interrupts are disabled.
-		This time is saved in this file. The max trace
-		will also be stored, and displayed by either
-		"trace" or "latency_trace".  A new max trace will
-		only be recorded if the latency is greater than
-		the value in this file. (in microseconds)
-
-  buffer_size_kb: This sets or displays the number of kilobytes each CPU
-		buffer can hold. The tracer buffers are the same size
-		for each CPU. The displayed number is the size of the
-		CPU buffer and not total size of all buffers. The
-		trace buffers are allocated in pages (blocks of memory
-		that the kernel uses for allocation, usually 4 KB in size).
-		If the last page allocated has room for more bytes
-		than requested, the rest of the page will be used,
-		making the actual allocation bigger than requested.
-		(Note, the size may not be a multiple of the page size due
-		to buffer managment overhead.)
-
-		This can only be updated when the current_tracer
-		is set to "nop".
-
-  tracing_cpumask: This is a mask that lets the user only trace
-		on specified CPUS. The format is a hex string
-		representing the CPUS.
-
-  set_ftrace_filter: When dynamic ftrace is configured in (see the
-		section below "dynamic ftrace"), the code is dynamically
-		modified (code text rewrite) to disable calling of the
-		function profiler (mcount). This lets tracing be configured
-		in with practically no overhead in performance.  This also
-		has a side effect of enabling or disabling specific functions
-		to be traced. Echoing names of functions into this file
-		will limit the trace to only those functions.
-
-  set_ftrace_notrace: This has an effect opposite to that of
-		set_ftrace_filter. Any function that is added here will not
-		be traced. If a function exists in both set_ftrace_filter
-		and set_ftrace_notrace,	the function will _not_ be traced.
-
-  set_ftrace_pid: Have the function tracer only trace a single thread.
-
-  available_filter_functions: This lists the functions that ftrace
-		has processed and can trace. These are the function
-		names that you can pass to "set_ftrace_filter" or
-		"set_ftrace_notrace". (See the section "dynamic ftrace"
-		below for more details.)
-
-
-The Tracers
------------
-
-Here is the list of current tracers that may be configured.
-
-  function - function tracer that uses mcount to trace all functions.
-
-  sched_switch - traces the context switches between tasks.
-
-  irqsoff - traces the areas that disable interrupts and saves
-  		the trace with the longest max latency.
-		See tracing_max_latency.  When a new max is recorded,
-		it replaces the old trace. It is best to view this
-		trace via the latency_trace file.
-
-  preemptoff - Similar to irqsoff but traces and records the amount of
-		time for which preemption is disabled.
-
-  preemptirqsoff - Similar to irqsoff and preemptoff, but traces and
-		 records the largest time for which irqs and/or preemption
-		 is disabled.
-
-  wakeup - Traces and records the max latency that it takes for
-		the highest priority task to get scheduled after
-		it has been woken up.
-
-  nop - This is not a tracer. To remove all tracers from tracing
-		simply echo "nop" into current_tracer.
-
-
-Examples of using the tracer
-----------------------------
-
-Here are typical examples of using the tracers when controlling them only
-with the debugfs interface (without using any user-land utilities).
-
-Output format:
---------------
-
-Here is an example of the output format of the file "trace"
-
-                             --------
-# tracer: function
-#
-#           TASK-PID   CPU#    TIMESTAMP  FUNCTION
-#              | |      |          |         |
-            bash-4251  [01] 10152.583854: path_put <-path_walk
-            bash-4251  [01] 10152.583855: dput <-path_put
-            bash-4251  [01] 10152.583855: _atomic_dec_and_lock <-dput
-                             --------
-
-A header is printed with the tracer name that is represented by the trace.
-In this case the tracer is "function". Then a header showing the format. Task
-name "bash", the task PID "4251", the CPU that it was running on
-"01", the timestamp in <secs>.<usecs> format, the function name that was
-traced "path_put" and the parent function that called this function
-"path_walk". The timestamp is the time at which the function was
-entered.
-
-The sched_switch tracer also includes tracing of task wakeups and
-context switches.
-
-     ksoftirqd/1-7     [01]  1453.070013:      7:115:R   +  2916:115:S
-     ksoftirqd/1-7     [01]  1453.070013:      7:115:R   +    10:115:S
-     ksoftirqd/1-7     [01]  1453.070013:      7:115:R ==>    10:115:R
-        events/1-10    [01]  1453.070013:     10:115:S ==>  2916:115:R
-     kondemand/1-2916  [01]  1453.070013:   2916:115:S ==>     7:115:R
-     ksoftirqd/1-7     [01]  1453.070013:      7:115:S ==>     0:140:R
-
-Wake ups are represented by a "+" and the context switches are shown as
-"==>".  The format is:
-
- Context switches:
-
-       Previous task              Next Task
-
-  <pid>:<prio>:<state>  ==>  <pid>:<prio>:<state>
-
- Wake ups:
-
-       Current task               Task waking up
-
-  <pid>:<prio>:<state>    +  <pid>:<prio>:<state>
-
-The prio is the internal kernel priority, which is the inverse of the
-priority that is usually displayed by user-space tools. Zero represents
-the highest priority (99). Prio 100 starts the "nice" priorities with
-100 being equal to nice -20 and 139 being nice 19. The prio "140" is
-reserved for the idle task which is the lowest priority thread (pid 0).
-
-
-Latency trace format
---------------------
-
-For traces that display latency times, the latency_trace file gives
-somewhat more information to see why a latency happened. Here is a typical
-trace.
-
-# tracer: irqsoff
-#
-irqsoff latency trace v1.1.5 on 2.6.26-rc8
---------------------------------------------------------------------
- latency: 97 us, #3/3, CPU#0 | (M:preempt VP:0, KP:0, SP:0 HP:0 #P:2)
-    -----------------
-    | task: swapper-0 (uid:0 nice:0 policy:0 rt_prio:0)
-    -----------------
- => started at: apic_timer_interrupt
- => ended at:   do_softirq
-
-#                _------=> CPU#
-#               / _-----=> irqs-off
-#              | / _----=> need-resched
-#              || / _---=> hardirq/softirq
-#              ||| / _--=> preempt-depth
-#              |||| /
-#              |||||     delay
-#  cmd     pid ||||| time  |   caller
-#     \   /    |||||   \   |   /
-  <idle>-0     0d..1    0us+: trace_hardirqs_off_thunk (apic_timer_interrupt)
-  <idle>-0     0d.s.   97us : __do_softirq (do_softirq)
-  <idle>-0     0d.s1   98us : trace_hardirqs_on (do_softirq)
-
-
-
-This shows that the current tracer is "irqsoff" tracing the time for which
-interrupts were disabled. It gives the trace version and the version
-of the kernel upon which this was executed on (2.6.26-rc8). Then it displays
-the max latency in microsecs (97 us). The number of trace entries displayed
-and the total number recorded (both are three: #3/3). The type of
-preemption that was used (PREEMPT). VP, KP, SP, and HP are always zero
-and are reserved for later use. #P is the number of online CPUS (#P:2).
-
-The task is the process that was running when the latency occurred.
-(swapper pid: 0).
-
-The start and stop (the functions in which the interrupts were disabled and
-enabled respectively) that caused the latencies:
-
-  apic_timer_interrupt is where the interrupts were disabled.
-  do_softirq is where they were enabled again.
-
-The next lines after the header are the trace itself. The header
-explains which is which.
-
-  cmd: The name of the process in the trace.
-
-  pid: The PID of that process.
-
-  CPU#: The CPU which the process was running on.
-
-  irqs-off: 'd' interrupts are disabled. '.' otherwise.
-	    Note: If the architecture does not support a way to
-		  read the irq flags variable, an 'X' will always
-		  be printed here.
-
-  need-resched: 'N' task need_resched is set, '.' otherwise.
-
-  hardirq/softirq:
-	'H' - hard irq occurred inside a softirq.
-	'h' - hard irq is running
-	's' - soft irq is running
-	'.' - normal context.
-
-  preempt-depth: The level of preempt_disabled
-
-The above is mostly meaningful for kernel developers.
-
-  time: This differs from the trace file output. The trace file output
-	includes an absolute timestamp. The timestamp used by the
-	latency_trace file is relative to the start of the trace.
-
-  delay: This is just to help catch your eye a bit better. And
-	needs to be fixed to be only relative to the same CPU.
-	The marks are determined by the difference between this
-	current trace and the next trace.
-	 '!' - greater than preempt_mark_thresh (default 100)
-	 '+' - greater than 1 microsecond
-	 ' ' - less than or equal to 1 microsecond.
-
-  The rest is the same as the 'trace' file.
-
-
-trace_options
--------------
-
-The trace_options file is used to control what gets printed in the trace
-output. To see what is available, simply cat the file:
-
-  cat /debug/tracing/trace_options
-  print-parent nosym-offset nosym-addr noverbose noraw nohex nobin \
- noblock nostacktrace nosched-tree nouserstacktrace nosym-userobj
-
-To disable one of the options, echo in the option prepended with "no".
-
-  echo noprint-parent > /debug/tracing/trace_options
-
-To enable an option, leave off the "no".
-
-  echo sym-offset > /debug/tracing/trace_options
-
-Here are the available options:
-
-  print-parent - On function traces, display the calling function
-		as well as the function being traced.
-
-  print-parent:
-   bash-4000  [01]  1477.606694: simple_strtoul <-strict_strtoul
-
-  noprint-parent:
-   bash-4000  [01]  1477.606694: simple_strtoul
-
-
-  sym-offset - Display not only the function name, but also the offset
-		in the function. For example, instead of seeing just
-		"ktime_get", you will see "ktime_get+0xb/0x20".
-
-  sym-offset:
-   bash-4000  [01]  1477.606694: simple_strtoul+0x6/0xa0
-
-  sym-addr - this will also display the function address as well as
-		the function name.
-
-  sym-addr:
-   bash-4000  [01]  1477.606694: simple_strtoul <c0339346>
-
-  verbose - This deals with the latency_trace file.
-
-    bash  4000 1 0 00000000 00010a95 [58127d26] 1720.415ms \
-    (+0.000ms): simple_strtoul (strict_strtoul)
-
-  raw - This will display raw numbers. This option is best for use with
-	user applications that can translate the raw numbers better than
-	having it done in the kernel.
-
-  hex - Similar to raw, but the numbers will be in a hexadecimal format.
-
-  bin - This will print out the formats in raw binary.
-
-  block - TBD (needs update)
-
-  stacktrace - This is one of the options that changes the trace itself.
-		When a trace is recorded, so is the stack of functions.
-		This allows for back traces of trace sites.
-
-  userstacktrace - This option changes the trace.
-		   It records a stacktrace of the current userspace thread.
-
-  sym-userobj - when user stacktrace are enabled, look up which object the
-		address belongs to, and print a relative address
-		This is especially useful when ASLR is on, otherwise you don't
-		get a chance to resolve the address to object/file/line after the app is no
-		longer running
-
-		The lookup is performed when you read trace,trace_pipe,latency_trace. Example:
-
-		a.out-1623  [000] 40874.465068: /root/a.out[+0x480] <-/root/a.out[+0
-x494] <- /root/a.out[+0x4a8] <- /lib/libc-2.7.so[+0x1e1a6]
-
-  sched-tree - TBD (any users??)
-
-
-sched_switch
-------------
-
-This tracer simply records schedule switches. Here is an example
-of how to use it.
-
- # echo sched_switch > /debug/tracing/current_tracer
- # echo 1 > /debug/tracing/tracing_enabled
- # sleep 1
- # echo 0 > /debug/tracing/tracing_enabled
- # cat /debug/tracing/trace
-
-# tracer: sched_switch
-#
-#           TASK-PID   CPU#    TIMESTAMP  FUNCTION
-#              | |      |          |         |
-            bash-3997  [01]   240.132281:   3997:120:R   +  4055:120:R
-            bash-3997  [01]   240.132284:   3997:120:R ==>  4055:120:R
-           sleep-4055  [01]   240.132371:   4055:120:S ==>  3997:120:R
-            bash-3997  [01]   240.132454:   3997:120:R   +  4055:120:S
-            bash-3997  [01]   240.132457:   3997:120:R ==>  4055:120:R
-           sleep-4055  [01]   240.132460:   4055:120:D ==>  3997:120:R
-            bash-3997  [01]   240.132463:   3997:120:R   +  4055:120:D
-            bash-3997  [01]   240.132465:   3997:120:R ==>  4055:120:R
-          <idle>-0     [00]   240.132589:      0:140:R   +     4:115:S
-          <idle>-0     [00]   240.132591:      0:140:R ==>     4:115:R
-     ksoftirqd/0-4     [00]   240.132595:      4:115:S ==>     0:140:R
-          <idle>-0     [00]   240.132598:      0:140:R   +     4:115:S
-          <idle>-0     [00]   240.132599:      0:140:R ==>     4:115:R
-     ksoftirqd/0-4     [00]   240.132603:      4:115:S ==>     0:140:R
-           sleep-4055  [01]   240.133058:   4055:120:S ==>  3997:120:R
- [...]
-
-
-As we have discussed previously about this format, the header shows
-the name of the trace and points to the options. The "FUNCTION"
-is a misnomer since here it represents the wake ups and context
-switches.
-
-The sched_switch file only lists the wake ups (represented with '+')
-and context switches ('==>') with the previous task or current task
-first followed by the next task or task waking up. The format for both
-of these is PID:KERNEL-PRIO:TASK-STATE. Remember that the KERNEL-PRIO
-is the inverse of the actual priority with zero (0) being the highest
-priority and the nice values starting at 100 (nice -20). Below is
-a quick chart to map the kernel priority to user land priorities.
-
-  Kernel priority: 0 to 99    ==> user RT priority 99 to 0
-  Kernel priority: 100 to 139 ==> user nice -20 to 19
-  Kernel priority: 140        ==> idle task priority
-
-The task states are:
-
- R - running : wants to run, may not actually be running
- S - sleep   : process is waiting to be woken up (handles signals)
- D - disk sleep (uninterruptible sleep) : process must be woken up
-					(ignores signals)
- T - stopped : process suspended
- t - traced  : process is being traced (with something like gdb)
- Z - zombie  : process waiting to be cleaned up
- X - unknown
-
-
-ftrace_enabled
---------------
-
-The following tracers (listed below) give different output depending
-on whether or not the sysctl ftrace_enabled is set. To set ftrace_enabled,
-one can either use the sysctl function or set it via the proc
-file system interface.
-
-  sysctl kernel.ftrace_enabled=1
-
- or
-
-  echo 1 > /proc/sys/kernel/ftrace_enabled
-
-To disable ftrace_enabled simply replace the '1' with '0' in
-the above commands.
-
-When ftrace_enabled is set the tracers will also record the functions
-that are within the trace. The descriptions of the tracers
-will also show an example with ftrace enabled.
-
-
-irqsoff
--------
-
-When interrupts are disabled, the CPU can not react to any other
-external event (besides NMIs and SMIs). This prevents the timer
-interrupt from triggering or the mouse interrupt from letting the
-kernel know of a new mouse event. The result is a latency with the
-reaction time.
-
-The irqsoff tracer tracks the time for which interrupts are disabled.
-When a new maximum latency is hit, the tracer saves the trace leading up
-to that latency point so that every time a new maximum is reached, the old
-saved trace is discarded and the new trace is saved.
-
-To reset the maximum, echo 0 into tracing_max_latency. Here is an
-example:
-
- # echo irqsoff > /debug/tracing/current_tracer
- # echo 0 > /debug/tracing/tracing_max_latency
- # echo 1 > /debug/tracing/tracing_enabled
- # ls -ltr
- [...]
- # echo 0 > /debug/tracing/tracing_enabled
- # cat /debug/tracing/latency_trace
-# tracer: irqsoff
-#
-irqsoff latency trace v1.1.5 on 2.6.26
---------------------------------------------------------------------
- latency: 12 us, #3/3, CPU#1 | (M:preempt VP:0, KP:0, SP:0 HP:0 #P:2)
-    -----------------
-    | task: bash-3730 (uid:0 nice:0 policy:0 rt_prio:0)
-    -----------------
- => started at: sys_setpgid
- => ended at:   sys_setpgid
-
-#                _------=> CPU#
-#               / _-----=> irqs-off
-#              | / _----=> need-resched
-#              || / _---=> hardirq/softirq
-#              ||| / _--=> preempt-depth
-#              |||| /
-#              |||||     delay
-#  cmd     pid ||||| time  |   caller
-#     \   /    |||||   \   |   /
-    bash-3730  1d...    0us : _write_lock_irq (sys_setpgid)
-    bash-3730  1d..1    1us+: _write_unlock_irq (sys_setpgid)
-    bash-3730  1d..2   14us : trace_hardirqs_on (sys_setpgid)
-
-
-Here we see that that we had a latency of 12 microsecs (which is
-very good). The _write_lock_irq in sys_setpgid disabled interrupts.
-The difference between the 12 and the displayed timestamp 14us occurred
-because the clock was incremented between the time of recording the max
-latency and the time of recording the function that had that latency.
-
-Note the above example had ftrace_enabled not set. If we set the
-ftrace_enabled, we get a much larger output:
-
-# tracer: irqsoff
-#
-irqsoff latency trace v1.1.5 on 2.6.26-rc8
---------------------------------------------------------------------
- latency: 50 us, #101/101, CPU#0 | (M:preempt VP:0, KP:0, SP:0 HP:0 #P:2)
-    -----------------
-    | task: ls-4339 (uid:0 nice:0 policy:0 rt_prio:0)
-    -----------------
- => started at: __alloc_pages_internal
- => ended at:   __alloc_pages_internal
-
-#                _------=> CPU#
-#               / _-----=> irqs-off
-#              | / _----=> need-resched
-#              || / _---=> hardirq/softirq
-#              ||| / _--=> preempt-depth
-#              |||| /
-#              |||||     delay
-#  cmd     pid ||||| time  |   caller
-#     \   /    |||||   \   |   /
-      ls-4339  0...1    0us+: get_page_from_freelist (__alloc_pages_internal)
-      ls-4339  0d..1    3us : rmqueue_bulk (get_page_from_freelist)
-      ls-4339  0d..1    3us : _spin_lock (rmqueue_bulk)
-      ls-4339  0d..1    4us : add_preempt_count (_spin_lock)
-      ls-4339  0d..2    4us : __rmqueue (rmqueue_bulk)
-      ls-4339  0d..2    5us : __rmqueue_smallest (__rmqueue)
-      ls-4339  0d..2    5us : __mod_zone_page_state (__rmqueue_smallest)
-      ls-4339  0d..2    6us : __rmqueue (rmqueue_bulk)
-      ls-4339  0d..2    6us : __rmqueue_smallest (__rmqueue)
-      ls-4339  0d..2    7us : __mod_zone_page_state (__rmqueue_smallest)
-      ls-4339  0d..2    7us : __rmqueue (rmqueue_bulk)
-      ls-4339  0d..2    8us : __rmqueue_smallest (__rmqueue)
-[...]
-      ls-4339  0d..2   46us : __rmqueue_smallest (__rmqueue)
-      ls-4339  0d..2   47us : __mod_zone_page_state (__rmqueue_smallest)
-      ls-4339  0d..2   47us : __rmqueue (rmqueue_bulk)
-      ls-4339  0d..2   48us : __rmqueue_smallest (__rmqueue)
-      ls-4339  0d..2   48us : __mod_zone_page_state (__rmqueue_smallest)
-      ls-4339  0d..2   49us : _spin_unlock (rmqueue_bulk)
-      ls-4339  0d..2   49us : sub_preempt_count (_spin_unlock)
-      ls-4339  0d..1   50us : get_page_from_freelist (__alloc_pages_internal)
-      ls-4339  0d..2   51us : trace_hardirqs_on (__alloc_pages_internal)
-
-
-
-Here we traced a 50 microsecond latency. But we also see all the
-functions that were called during that time. Note that by enabling
-function tracing, we incur an added overhead. This overhead may
-extend the latency times. But nevertheless, this trace has provided
-some very helpful debugging information.
-
-
-preemptoff
-----------
-
-When preemption is disabled, we may be able to receive interrupts but
-the task cannot be preempted and a higher priority task must wait
-for preemption to be enabled again before it can preempt a lower
-priority task.
-
-The preemptoff tracer traces the places that disable preemption.
-Like the irqsoff tracer, it records the maximum latency for which preemption
-was disabled. The control of preemptoff tracer is much like the irqsoff
-tracer.
-
- # echo preemptoff > /debug/tracing/current_tracer
- # echo 0 > /debug/tracing/tracing_max_latency
- # echo 1 > /debug/tracing/tracing_enabled
- # ls -ltr
- [...]
- # echo 0 > /debug/tracing/tracing_enabled
- # cat /debug/tracing/latency_trace
-# tracer: preemptoff
-#
-preemptoff latency trace v1.1.5 on 2.6.26-rc8
---------------------------------------------------------------------
- latency: 29 us, #3/3, CPU#0 | (M:preempt VP:0, KP:0, SP:0 HP:0 #P:2)
-    -----------------
-    | task: sshd-4261 (uid:0 nice:0 policy:0 rt_prio:0)
-    -----------------
- => started at: do_IRQ
- => ended at:   __do_softirq
-
-#                _------=> CPU#
-#               / _-----=> irqs-off
-#              | / _----=> need-resched
-#              || / _---=> hardirq/softirq
-#              ||| / _--=> preempt-depth
-#              |||| /
-#              |||||     delay
-#  cmd     pid ||||| time  |   caller
-#     \   /    |||||   \   |   /
-    sshd-4261  0d.h.    0us+: irq_enter (do_IRQ)
-    sshd-4261  0d.s.   29us : _local_bh_enable (__do_softirq)
-    sshd-4261  0d.s1   30us : trace_preempt_on (__do_softirq)
-
-
-This has some more changes. Preemption was disabled when an interrupt
-came in (notice the 'h'), and was enabled while doing a softirq.
-(notice the 's'). But we also see that interrupts have been disabled
-when entering the preempt off section and leaving it (the 'd').
-We do not know if interrupts were enabled in the mean time.
-
-# tracer: preemptoff
-#
-preemptoff latency trace v1.1.5 on 2.6.26-rc8
---------------------------------------------------------------------
- latency: 63 us, #87/87, CPU#0 | (M:preempt VP:0, KP:0, SP:0 HP:0 #P:2)
-    -----------------
-    | task: sshd-4261 (uid:0 nice:0 policy:0 rt_prio:0)
-    -----------------
- => started at: remove_wait_queue
- => ended at:   __do_softirq
-
-#                _------=> CPU#
-#               / _-----=> irqs-off
-#              | / _----=> need-resched
-#              || / _---=> hardirq/softirq
-#              ||| / _--=> preempt-depth
-#              |||| /
-#              |||||     delay
-#  cmd     pid ||||| time  |   caller
-#     \   /    |||||   \   |   /
-    sshd-4261  0d..1    0us : _spin_lock_irqsave (remove_wait_queue)
-    sshd-4261  0d..1    1us : _spin_unlock_irqrestore (remove_wait_queue)
-    sshd-4261  0d..1    2us : do_IRQ (common_interrupt)
-    sshd-4261  0d..1    2us : irq_enter (do_IRQ)
-    sshd-4261  0d..1    2us : idle_cpu (irq_enter)
-    sshd-4261  0d..1    3us : add_preempt_count (irq_enter)
-    sshd-4261  0d.h1    3us : idle_cpu (irq_enter)
-    sshd-4261  0d.h.    4us : handle_fasteoi_irq (do_IRQ)
-[...]
-    sshd-4261  0d.h.   12us : add_preempt_count (_spin_lock)
-    sshd-4261  0d.h1   12us : ack_ioapic_quirk_irq (handle_fasteoi_irq)
-    sshd-4261  0d.h1   13us : move_native_irq (ack_ioapic_quirk_irq)
-    sshd-4261  0d.h1   13us : _spin_unlock (handle_fasteoi_irq)
-    sshd-4261  0d.h1   14us : sub_preempt_count (_spin_unlock)
-    sshd-4261  0d.h1   14us : irq_exit (do_IRQ)
-    sshd-4261  0d.h1   15us : sub_preempt_count (irq_exit)
-    sshd-4261  0d..2   15us : do_softirq (irq_exit)
-    sshd-4261  0d...   15us : __do_softirq (do_softirq)
-    sshd-4261  0d...   16us : __local_bh_disable (__do_softirq)
-    sshd-4261  0d...   16us+: add_preempt_count (__local_bh_disable)
-    sshd-4261  0d.s4   20us : add_preempt_count (__local_bh_disable)
-    sshd-4261  0d.s4   21us : sub_preempt_count (local_bh_enable)
-    sshd-4261  0d.s5   21us : sub_preempt_count (local_bh_enable)
-[...]
-    sshd-4261  0d.s6   41us : add_preempt_count (__local_bh_disable)
-    sshd-4261  0d.s6   42us : sub_preempt_count (local_bh_enable)
-    sshd-4261  0d.s7   42us : sub_preempt_count (local_bh_enable)
-    sshd-4261  0d.s5   43us : add_preempt_count (__local_bh_disable)
-    sshd-4261  0d.s5   43us : sub_preempt_count (local_bh_enable_ip)
-    sshd-4261  0d.s6   44us : sub_preempt_count (local_bh_enable_ip)
-    sshd-4261  0d.s5   44us : add_preempt_count (__local_bh_disable)
-    sshd-4261  0d.s5   45us : sub_preempt_count (local_bh_enable)
-[...]
-    sshd-4261  0d.s.   63us : _local_bh_enable (__do_softirq)
-    sshd-4261  0d.s1   64us : trace_preempt_on (__do_softirq)
-
-
-The above is an example of the preemptoff trace with ftrace_enabled
-set. Here we see that interrupts were disabled the entire time.
-The irq_enter code lets us know that we entered an interrupt 'h'.
-Before that, the functions being traced still show that it is not
-in an interrupt, but we can see from the functions themselves that
-this is not the case.
-
-Notice that __do_softirq when called does not have a preempt_count.
-It may seem that we missed a preempt enabling. What really happened
-is that the preempt count is held on the thread's stack and we
-switched to the softirq stack (4K stacks in effect). The code
-does not copy the preempt count, but because interrupts are disabled,
-we do not need to worry about it. Having a tracer like this is good
-for letting people know what really happens inside the kernel.
-
-
-preemptirqsoff
---------------
-
-Knowing the locations that have interrupts disabled or preemption
-disabled for the longest times is helpful. But sometimes we would
-like to know when either preemption and/or interrupts are disabled.
-
-Consider the following code:
-
-    local_irq_disable();
-    call_function_with_irqs_off();
-    preempt_disable();
-    call_function_with_irqs_and_preemption_off();
-    local_irq_enable();
-    call_function_with_preemption_off();
-    preempt_enable();
-
-The irqsoff tracer will record the total length of
-call_function_with_irqs_off() and
-call_function_with_irqs_and_preemption_off().
-
-The preemptoff tracer will record the total length of
-call_function_with_irqs_and_preemption_off() and
-call_function_with_preemption_off().
-
-But neither will trace the time that interrupts and/or preemption
-is disabled. This total time is the time that we can not schedule.
-To record this time, use the preemptirqsoff tracer.
-
-Again, using this trace is much like the irqsoff and preemptoff tracers.
-
- # echo preemptirqsoff > /debug/tracing/current_tracer
- # echo 0 > /debug/tracing/tracing_max_latency
- # echo 1 > /debug/tracing/tracing_enabled
- # ls -ltr
- [...]
- # echo 0 > /debug/tracing/tracing_enabled
- # cat /debug/tracing/latency_trace
-# tracer: preemptirqsoff
-#
-preemptirqsoff latency trace v1.1.5 on 2.6.26-rc8
---------------------------------------------------------------------
- latency: 293 us, #3/3, CPU#0 | (M:preempt VP:0, KP:0, SP:0 HP:0 #P:2)
-    -----------------
-    | task: ls-4860 (uid:0 nice:0 policy:0 rt_prio:0)
-    -----------------
- => started at: apic_timer_interrupt
- => ended at:   __do_softirq
-
-#                _------=> CPU#
-#               / _-----=> irqs-off
-#              | / _----=> need-resched
-#              || / _---=> hardirq/softirq
-#              ||| / _--=> preempt-depth
-#              |||| /
-#              |||||     delay
-#  cmd     pid ||||| time  |   caller
-#     \   /    |||||   \   |   /
-      ls-4860  0d...    0us!: trace_hardirqs_off_thunk (apic_timer_interrupt)
-      ls-4860  0d.s.  294us : _local_bh_enable (__do_softirq)
-      ls-4860  0d.s1  294us : trace_preempt_on (__do_softirq)
-
-
-
-The trace_hardirqs_off_thunk is called from assembly on x86 when
-interrupts are disabled in the assembly code. Without the function
-tracing, we do not know if interrupts were enabled within the preemption
-points. We do see that it started with preemption enabled.
-
-Here is a trace with ftrace_enabled set:
-
-
-# tracer: preemptirqsoff
-#
-preemptirqsoff latency trace v1.1.5 on 2.6.26-rc8
---------------------------------------------------------------------
- latency: 105 us, #183/183, CPU#0 | (M:preempt VP:0, KP:0, SP:0 HP:0 #P:2)
-    -----------------
-    | task: sshd-4261 (uid:0 nice:0 policy:0 rt_prio:0)
-    -----------------
- => started at: write_chan
- => ended at:   __do_softirq
-
-#                _------=> CPU#
-#               / _-----=> irqs-off
-#              | / _----=> need-resched
-#              || / _---=> hardirq/softirq
-#              ||| / _--=> preempt-depth
-#              |||| /
-#              |||||     delay
-#  cmd     pid ||||| time  |   caller
-#     \   /    |||||   \   |   /
-      ls-4473  0.N..    0us : preempt_schedule (write_chan)
-      ls-4473  0dN.1    1us : _spin_lock (schedule)
-      ls-4473  0dN.1    2us : add_preempt_count (_spin_lock)
-      ls-4473  0d..2    2us : put_prev_task_fair (schedule)
-[...]
-      ls-4473  0d..2   13us : set_normalized_timespec (ktime_get_ts)
-      ls-4473  0d..2   13us : __switch_to (schedule)
-    sshd-4261  0d..2   14us : finish_task_switch (schedule)
-    sshd-4261  0d..2   14us : _spin_unlock_irq (finish_task_switch)
-    sshd-4261  0d..1   15us : add_preempt_count (_spin_lock_irqsave)
-    sshd-4261  0d..2   16us : _spin_unlock_irqrestore (hrtick_set)
-    sshd-4261  0d..2   16us : do_IRQ (common_interrupt)
-    sshd-4261  0d..2   17us : irq_enter (do_IRQ)
-    sshd-4261  0d..2   17us : idle_cpu (irq_enter)
-    sshd-4261  0d..2   18us : add_preempt_count (irq_enter)
-    sshd-4261  0d.h2   18us : idle_cpu (irq_enter)
-    sshd-4261  0d.h.   18us : handle_fasteoi_irq (do_IRQ)
-    sshd-4261  0d.h.   19us : _spin_lock (handle_fasteoi_irq)
-    sshd-4261  0d.h.   19us : add_preempt_count (_spin_lock)
-    sshd-4261  0d.h1   20us : _spin_unlock (handle_fasteoi_irq)
-    sshd-4261  0d.h1   20us : sub_preempt_count (_spin_unlock)
-[...]
-    sshd-4261  0d.h1   28us : _spin_unlock (handle_fasteoi_irq)
-    sshd-4261  0d.h1   29us : sub_preempt_count (_spin_unlock)
-    sshd-4261  0d.h2   29us : irq_exit (do_IRQ)
-    sshd-4261  0d.h2   29us : sub_preempt_count (irq_exit)
-    sshd-4261  0d..3   30us : do_softirq (irq_exit)
-    sshd-4261  0d...   30us : __do_softirq (do_softirq)
-    sshd-4261  0d...   31us : __local_bh_disable (__do_softirq)
-    sshd-4261  0d...   31us+: add_preempt_count (__local_bh_disable)
-    sshd-4261  0d.s4   34us : add_preempt_count (__local_bh_disable)
-[...]
-    sshd-4261  0d.s3   43us : sub_preempt_count (local_bh_enable_ip)
-    sshd-4261  0d.s4   44us : sub_preempt_count (local_bh_enable_ip)
-    sshd-4261  0d.s3   44us : smp_apic_timer_interrupt (apic_timer_interrupt)
-    sshd-4261  0d.s3   45us : irq_enter (smp_apic_timer_interrupt)
-    sshd-4261  0d.s3   45us : idle_cpu (irq_enter)
-    sshd-4261  0d.s3   46us : add_preempt_count (irq_enter)
-    sshd-4261  0d.H3   46us : idle_cpu (irq_enter)
-    sshd-4261  0d.H3   47us : hrtimer_interrupt (smp_apic_timer_interrupt)
-    sshd-4261  0d.H3   47us : ktime_get (hrtimer_interrupt)
-[...]
-    sshd-4261  0d.H3   81us : tick_program_event (hrtimer_interrupt)
-    sshd-4261  0d.H3   82us : ktime_get (tick_program_event)
-    sshd-4261  0d.H3   82us : ktime_get_ts (ktime_get)
-    sshd-4261  0d.H3   83us : getnstimeofday (ktime_get_ts)
-    sshd-4261  0d.H3   83us : set_normalized_timespec (ktime_get_ts)
-    sshd-4261  0d.H3   84us : clockevents_program_event (tick_program_event)
-    sshd-4261  0d.H3   84us : lapic_next_event (clockevents_program_event)
-    sshd-4261  0d.H3   85us : irq_exit (smp_apic_timer_interrupt)
-    sshd-4261  0d.H3   85us : sub_preempt_count (irq_exit)
-    sshd-4261  0d.s4   86us : sub_preempt_count (irq_exit)
-    sshd-4261  0d.s3   86us : add_preempt_count (__local_bh_disable)
-[...]
-    sshd-4261  0d.s1   98us : sub_preempt_count (net_rx_action)
-    sshd-4261  0d.s.   99us : add_preempt_count (_spin_lock_irq)
-    sshd-4261  0d.s1   99us+: _spin_unlock_irq (run_timer_softirq)
-    sshd-4261  0d.s.  104us : _local_bh_enable (__do_softirq)
-    sshd-4261  0d.s.  104us : sub_preempt_count (_local_bh_enable)
-    sshd-4261  0d.s.  105us : _local_bh_enable (__do_softirq)
-    sshd-4261  0d.s1  105us : trace_preempt_on (__do_softirq)
-
-
-This is a very interesting trace. It started with the preemption of
-the ls task. We see that the task had the "need_resched" bit set
-via the 'N' in the trace.  Interrupts were disabled before the spin_lock
-at the beginning of the trace. We see that a schedule took place to run
-sshd.  When the interrupts were enabled, we took an interrupt.
-On return from the interrupt handler, the softirq ran. We took another
-interrupt while running the softirq as we see from the capital 'H'.
-
-
-wakeup
-------
-
-In a Real-Time environment it is very important to know the wakeup
-time it takes for the highest priority task that is woken up to the
-time that it executes. This is also known as "schedule latency".
-I stress the point that this is about RT tasks. It is also important
-to know the scheduling latency of non-RT tasks, but the average
-schedule latency is better for non-RT tasks. Tools like
-LatencyTop are more appropriate for such measurements.
-
-Real-Time environments are interested in the worst case latency.
-That is the longest latency it takes for something to happen, and
-not the average. We can have a very fast scheduler that may only
-have a large latency once in a while, but that would not work well
-with Real-Time tasks.  The wakeup tracer was designed to record
-the worst case wakeups of RT tasks. Non-RT tasks are not recorded
-because the tracer only records one worst case and tracing non-RT
-tasks that are unpredictable will overwrite the worst case latency
-of RT tasks.
-
-Since this tracer only deals with RT tasks, we will run this slightly
-differently than we did with the previous tracers. Instead of performing
-an 'ls', we will run 'sleep 1' under 'chrt' which changes the
-priority of the task.
-
- # echo wakeup > /debug/tracing/current_tracer
- # echo 0 > /debug/tracing/tracing_max_latency
- # echo 1 > /debug/tracing/tracing_enabled
- # chrt -f 5 sleep 1
- # echo 0 > /debug/tracing/tracing_enabled
- # cat /debug/tracing/latency_trace
-# tracer: wakeup
-#
-wakeup latency trace v1.1.5 on 2.6.26-rc8
---------------------------------------------------------------------
- latency: 4 us, #2/2, CPU#1 | (M:preempt VP:0, KP:0, SP:0 HP:0 #P:2)
-    -----------------
-    | task: sleep-4901 (uid:0 nice:0 policy:1 rt_prio:5)
-    -----------------
-
-#                _------=> CPU#
-#               / _-----=> irqs-off
-#              | / _----=> need-resched
-#              || / _---=> hardirq/softirq
-#              ||| / _--=> preempt-depth
-#              |||| /
-#              |||||     delay
-#  cmd     pid ||||| time  |   caller
-#     \   /    |||||   \   |   /
-  <idle>-0     1d.h4    0us+: try_to_wake_up (wake_up_process)
-  <idle>-0     1d..4    4us : schedule (cpu_idle)
-
-
-
-Running this on an idle system, we see that it only took 4 microseconds
-to perform the task switch.  Note, since the trace marker in the
-schedule is before the actual "switch", we stop the tracing when
-the recorded task is about to schedule in. This may change if
-we add a new marker at the end of the scheduler.
-
-Notice that the recorded task is 'sleep' with the PID of 4901 and it
-has an rt_prio of 5. This priority is user-space priority and not
-the internal kernel priority. The policy is 1 for SCHED_FIFO and 2
-for SCHED_RR.
-
-Doing the same with chrt -r 5 and ftrace_enabled set.
-
-# tracer: wakeup
-#
-wakeup latency trace v1.1.5 on 2.6.26-rc8
---------------------------------------------------------------------
- latency: 50 us, #60/60, CPU#1 | (M:preempt VP:0, KP:0, SP:0 HP:0 #P:2)
-    -----------------
-    | task: sleep-4068 (uid:0 nice:0 policy:2 rt_prio:5)
-    -----------------
-
-#                _------=> CPU#
-#               / _-----=> irqs-off
-#              | / _----=> need-resched
-#              || / _---=> hardirq/softirq
-#              ||| / _--=> preempt-depth
-#              |||| /
-#              |||||     delay
-#  cmd     pid ||||| time  |   caller
-#     \   /    |||||   \   |   /
-ksoftirq-7     1d.H3    0us : try_to_wake_up (wake_up_process)
-ksoftirq-7     1d.H4    1us : sub_preempt_count (marker_probe_cb)
-ksoftirq-7     1d.H3    2us : check_preempt_wakeup (try_to_wake_up)
-ksoftirq-7     1d.H3    3us : update_curr (check_preempt_wakeup)
-ksoftirq-7     1d.H3    4us : calc_delta_mine (update_curr)
-ksoftirq-7     1d.H3    5us : __resched_task (check_preempt_wakeup)
-ksoftirq-7     1d.H3    6us : task_wake_up_rt (try_to_wake_up)
-ksoftirq-7     1d.H3    7us : _spin_unlock_irqrestore (try_to_wake_up)
-[...]
-ksoftirq-7     1d.H2   17us : irq_exit (smp_apic_timer_interrupt)
-ksoftirq-7     1d.H2   18us : sub_preempt_count (irq_exit)
-ksoftirq-7     1d.s3   19us : sub_preempt_count (irq_exit)
-ksoftirq-7     1..s2   20us : rcu_process_callbacks (__do_softirq)
-[...]
-ksoftirq-7     1..s2   26us : __rcu_process_callbacks (rcu_process_callbacks)
-ksoftirq-7     1d.s2   27us : _local_bh_enable (__do_softirq)
-ksoftirq-7     1d.s2   28us : sub_preempt_count (_local_bh_enable)
-ksoftirq-7     1.N.3   29us : sub_preempt_count (ksoftirqd)
-ksoftirq-7     1.N.2   30us : _cond_resched (ksoftirqd)
-ksoftirq-7     1.N.2   31us : __cond_resched (_cond_resched)
-ksoftirq-7     1.N.2   32us : add_preempt_count (__cond_resched)
-ksoftirq-7     1.N.2   33us : schedule (__cond_resched)
-ksoftirq-7     1.N.2   33us : add_preempt_count (schedule)
-ksoftirq-7     1.N.3   34us : hrtick_clear (schedule)
-ksoftirq-7     1dN.3   35us : _spin_lock (schedule)
-ksoftirq-7     1dN.3   36us : add_preempt_count (_spin_lock)
-ksoftirq-7     1d..4   37us : put_prev_task_fair (schedule)
-ksoftirq-7     1d..4   38us : update_curr (put_prev_task_fair)
-[...]
-ksoftirq-7     1d..5   47us : _spin_trylock (tracing_record_cmdline)
-ksoftirq-7     1d..5   48us : add_preempt_count (_spin_trylock)
-ksoftirq-7     1d..6   49us : _spin_unlock (tracing_record_cmdline)
-ksoftirq-7     1d..6   49us : sub_preempt_count (_spin_unlock)
-ksoftirq-7     1d..4   50us : schedule (__cond_resched)
-
-The interrupt went off while running ksoftirqd. This task runs at
-SCHED_OTHER. Why did not we see the 'N' set early? This may be
-a harmless bug with x86_32 and 4K stacks. On x86_32 with 4K stacks
-configured, the interrupt and softirq run with their own stack.
-Some information is held on the top of the task's stack (need_resched
-and preempt_count are both stored there). The setting of the NEED_RESCHED
-bit is done directly to the task's stack, but the reading of the
-NEED_RESCHED is done by looking at the current stack, which in this case
-is the stack for the hard interrupt. This hides the fact that NEED_RESCHED
-has been set. We do not see the 'N' until we switch back to the task's
-assigned stack.
-
-function
---------
-
-This tracer is the function tracer. Enabling the function tracer
-can be done from the debug file system. Make sure the ftrace_enabled is
-set; otherwise this tracer is a nop.
-
- # sysctl kernel.ftrace_enabled=1
- # echo function > /debug/tracing/current_tracer
- # echo 1 > /debug/tracing/tracing_enabled
- # usleep 1
- # echo 0 > /debug/tracing/tracing_enabled
- # cat /debug/tracing/trace
-# tracer: function
-#
-#           TASK-PID   CPU#    TIMESTAMP  FUNCTION
-#              | |      |          |         |
-            bash-4003  [00]   123.638713: finish_task_switch <-schedule
-            bash-4003  [00]   123.638714: _spin_unlock_irq <-finish_task_switch
-            bash-4003  [00]   123.638714: sub_preempt_count <-_spin_unlock_irq
-            bash-4003  [00]   123.638715: hrtick_set <-schedule
-            bash-4003  [00]   123.638715: _spin_lock_irqsave <-hrtick_set
-            bash-4003  [00]   123.638716: add_preempt_count <-_spin_lock_irqsave
-            bash-4003  [00]   123.638716: _spin_unlock_irqrestore <-hrtick_set
-            bash-4003  [00]   123.638717: sub_preempt_count <-_spin_unlock_irqrestore
-            bash-4003  [00]   123.638717: hrtick_clear <-hrtick_set
-            bash-4003  [00]   123.638718: sub_preempt_count <-schedule
-            bash-4003  [00]   123.638718: sub_preempt_count <-preempt_schedule
-            bash-4003  [00]   123.638719: wait_for_completion <-__stop_machine_run
-            bash-4003  [00]   123.638719: wait_for_common <-wait_for_completion
-            bash-4003  [00]   123.638720: _spin_lock_irq <-wait_for_common
-            bash-4003  [00]   123.638720: add_preempt_count <-_spin_lock_irq
-[...]
-
-
-Note: function tracer uses ring buffers to store the above entries.
-The newest data may overwrite the oldest data. Sometimes using echo to
-stop the trace is not sufficient because the tracing could have overwritten
-the data that you wanted to record. For this reason, it is sometimes better to
-disable tracing directly from a program. This allows you to stop the
-tracing at the point that you hit the part that you are interested in.
-To disable the tracing directly from a C program, something like following
-code snippet can be used:
-
-int trace_fd;
-[...]
-int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
-	[...]
-	trace_fd = open("/debug/tracing/tracing_enabled", O_WRONLY);
-	[...]
-	if (condition_hit()) {
-		write(trace_fd, "0", 1);
-	}
-	[...]
-}
-
-Note: Here we hard coded the path name. The debugfs mount is not
-guaranteed to be at /debug (and is more commonly at /sys/kernel/debug).
-For simple one time traces, the above is sufficent. For anything else,
-a search through /proc/mounts may be needed to find where the debugfs
-file-system is mounted.
-
-
-Single thread tracing
----------------------
-
-By writing into /debug/tracing/set_ftrace_pid you can trace a
-single thread. For example:
-
-# cat /debug/tracing/set_ftrace_pid
-no pid
-# echo 3111 > /debug/tracing/set_ftrace_pid
-# cat /debug/tracing/set_ftrace_pid
-3111
-# echo function > /debug/tracing/current_tracer
-# cat /debug/tracing/trace | head
- # tracer: function
- #
- #           TASK-PID    CPU#    TIMESTAMP  FUNCTION
- #              | |       |          |         |
-     yum-updatesd-3111  [003]  1637.254676: finish_task_switch <-thread_return
-     yum-updatesd-3111  [003]  1637.254681: hrtimer_cancel <-schedule_hrtimeout_range
-     yum-updatesd-3111  [003]  1637.254682: hrtimer_try_to_cancel <-hrtimer_cancel
-     yum-updatesd-3111  [003]  1637.254683: lock_hrtimer_base <-hrtimer_try_to_cancel
-     yum-updatesd-3111  [003]  1637.254685: fget_light <-do_sys_poll
-     yum-updatesd-3111  [003]  1637.254686: pipe_poll <-do_sys_poll
-# echo -1 > /debug/tracing/set_ftrace_pid
-# cat /debug/tracing/trace |head
- # tracer: function
- #
- #           TASK-PID    CPU#    TIMESTAMP  FUNCTION
- #              | |       |          |         |
- ##### CPU 3 buffer started ####
-     yum-updatesd-3111  [003]  1701.957688: free_poll_entry <-poll_freewait
-     yum-updatesd-3111  [003]  1701.957689: remove_wait_queue <-free_poll_entry
-     yum-updatesd-3111  [003]  1701.957691: fput <-free_poll_entry
-     yum-updatesd-3111  [003]  1701.957692: audit_syscall_exit <-sysret_audit
-     yum-updatesd-3111  [003]  1701.957693: path_put <-audit_syscall_exit
-
-If you want to trace a function when executing, you could use
-something like this simple program:
-
-#include <stdio.h>
-#include <stdlib.h>
-#include <sys/types.h>
-#include <sys/stat.h>
-#include <fcntl.h>
-#include <unistd.h>
-
-int main (int argc, char **argv)
-{
-        if (argc < 1)
-                exit(-1);
-
-        if (fork() > 0) {
-                int fd, ffd;
-                char line[64];
-                int s;
-
-                ffd = open("/debug/tracing/current_tracer", O_WRONLY);
-                if (ffd < 0)
-                        exit(-1);
-                write(ffd, "nop", 3);
-
-                fd = open("/debug/tracing/set_ftrace_pid", O_WRONLY);
-                s = sprintf(line, "%d\n", getpid());
-                write(fd, line, s);
-
-                write(ffd, "function", 8);
-
-                close(fd);
-                close(ffd);
-
-                execvp(argv[1], argv+1);
-        }
-
-        return 0;
-}
-
-dynamic ftrace
---------------
-
-If CONFIG_DYNAMIC_FTRACE is set, the system will run with
-virtually no overhead when function tracing is disabled. The way
-this works is the mcount function call (placed at the start of
-every kernel function, produced by the -pg switch in gcc), starts
-of pointing to a simple return. (Enabling FTRACE will include the
--pg switch in the compiling of the kernel.)
-
-At compile time every C file object is run through the
-recordmcount.pl script (located in the scripts directory). This
-script will process the C object using objdump to find all the
-locations in the .text section that call mcount. (Note, only
-the .text section is processed, since processing other sections
-like .init.text may cause races due to those sections being freed).
-
-A new section called "__mcount_loc" is created that holds references
-to all the mcount call sites in the .text section. This section is
-compiled back into the original object. The final linker will add
-all these references into a single table.
-
-On boot up, before SMP is initialized, the dynamic ftrace code
-scans this table and updates all the locations into nops. It also
-records the locations, which are added to the available_filter_functions
-list.  Modules are processed as they are loaded and before they are
-executed.  When a module is unloaded, it also removes its functions from
-the ftrace function list. This is automatic in the module unload
-code, and the module author does not need to worry about it.
-
-When tracing is enabled, kstop_machine is called to prevent races
-with the CPUS executing code being modified (which can cause the
-CPU to do undesireable things), and the nops are patched back
-to calls. But this time, they do not call mcount (which is just
-a function stub). They now call into the ftrace infrastructure.
-
-One special side-effect to the recording of the functions being
-traced is that we can now selectively choose which functions we
-wish to trace and which ones we want the mcount calls to remain as
-nops.
-
-Two files are used, one for enabling and one for disabling the tracing
-of specified functions. They are:
-
-  set_ftrace_filter
-
-and
-
-  set_ftrace_notrace
-
-A list of available functions that you can add to these files is listed
-in:
-
-   available_filter_functions
-
- # cat /debug/tracing/available_filter_functions
-put_prev_task_idle
-kmem_cache_create
-pick_next_task_rt
-get_online_cpus
-pick_next_task_fair
-mutex_lock
-[...]
-
-If I am only interested in sys_nanosleep and hrtimer_interrupt:
-
- # echo sys_nanosleep hrtimer_interrupt \
-		> /debug/tracing/set_ftrace_filter
- # echo ftrace > /debug/tracing/current_tracer
- # echo 1 > /debug/tracing/tracing_enabled
- # usleep 1
- # echo 0 > /debug/tracing/tracing_enabled
- # cat /debug/tracing/trace
-# tracer: ftrace
-#
-#           TASK-PID   CPU#    TIMESTAMP  FUNCTION
-#              | |      |          |         |
-          usleep-4134  [00]  1317.070017: hrtimer_interrupt <-smp_apic_timer_interrupt
-          usleep-4134  [00]  1317.070111: sys_nanosleep <-syscall_call
-          <idle>-0     [00]  1317.070115: hrtimer_interrupt <-smp_apic_timer_interrupt
-
-To see which functions are being traced, you can cat the file:
-
- # cat /debug/tracing/set_ftrace_filter
-hrtimer_interrupt
-sys_nanosleep
-
-
-Perhaps this is not enough. The filters also allow simple wild cards.
-Only the following are currently available
-
-  <match>*  - will match functions that begin with <match>
-  *<match>  - will match functions that end with <match>
-  *<match>* - will match functions that have <match> in it
-
-These are the only wild cards which are supported.
-
-  <match>*<match> will not work.
-
-Note: It is better to use quotes to enclose the wild cards, otherwise
-  the shell may expand the parameters into names of files in the local
-  directory.
-
- # echo 'hrtimer_*' > /debug/tracing/set_ftrace_filter
-
-Produces:
-
-# tracer: ftrace
-#
-#           TASK-PID   CPU#    TIMESTAMP  FUNCTION
-#              | |      |          |         |
-            bash-4003  [00]  1480.611794: hrtimer_init <-copy_process
-            bash-4003  [00]  1480.611941: hrtimer_start <-hrtick_set
-            bash-4003  [00]  1480.611956: hrtimer_cancel <-hrtick_clear
-            bash-4003  [00]  1480.611956: hrtimer_try_to_cancel <-hrtimer_cancel
-          <idle>-0     [00]  1480.612019: hrtimer_get_next_event <-get_next_timer_interrupt
-          <idle>-0     [00]  1480.612025: hrtimer_get_next_event <-get_next_timer_interrupt
-          <idle>-0     [00]  1480.612032: hrtimer_get_next_event <-get_next_timer_interrupt
-          <idle>-0     [00]  1480.612037: hrtimer_get_next_event <-get_next_timer_interrupt
-          <idle>-0     [00]  1480.612382: hrtimer_get_next_event <-get_next_timer_interrupt
-
-
-Notice that we lost the sys_nanosleep.
-
- # cat /debug/tracing/set_ftrace_filter
-hrtimer_run_queues
-hrtimer_run_pending
-hrtimer_init
-hrtimer_cancel
-hrtimer_try_to_cancel
-hrtimer_forward
-hrtimer_start
-hrtimer_reprogram
-hrtimer_force_reprogram
-hrtimer_get_next_event
-hrtimer_interrupt
-hrtimer_nanosleep
-hrtimer_wakeup
-hrtimer_get_remaining
-hrtimer_get_res
-hrtimer_init_sleeper
-
-
-This is because the '>' and '>>' act just like they do in bash.
-To rewrite the filters, use '>'
-To append to the filters, use '>>'
-
-To clear out a filter so that all functions will be recorded again:
-
- # echo > /debug/tracing/set_ftrace_filter
- # cat /debug/tracing/set_ftrace_filter
- #
-
-Again, now we want to append.
-
- # echo sys_nanosleep > /debug/tracing/set_ftrace_filter
- # cat /debug/tracing/set_ftrace_filter
-sys_nanosleep
- # echo 'hrtimer_*' >> /debug/tracing/set_ftrace_filter
- # cat /debug/tracing/set_ftrace_filter
-hrtimer_run_queues
-hrtimer_run_pending
-hrtimer_init
-hrtimer_cancel
-hrtimer_try_to_cancel
-hrtimer_forward
-hrtimer_start
-hrtimer_reprogram
-hrtimer_force_reprogram
-hrtimer_get_next_event
-hrtimer_interrupt
-sys_nanosleep
-hrtimer_nanosleep
-hrtimer_wakeup
-hrtimer_get_remaining
-hrtimer_get_res
-hrtimer_init_sleeper
-
-
-The set_ftrace_notrace prevents those functions from being traced.
-
- # echo '*preempt*' '*lock*' > /debug/tracing/set_ftrace_notrace
-
-Produces:
-
-# tracer: ftrace
-#
-#           TASK-PID   CPU#    TIMESTAMP  FUNCTION
-#              | |      |          |         |
-            bash-4043  [01]   115.281644: finish_task_switch <-schedule
-            bash-4043  [01]   115.281645: hrtick_set <-schedule
-            bash-4043  [01]   115.281645: hrtick_clear <-hrtick_set
-            bash-4043  [01]   115.281646: wait_for_completion <-__stop_machine_run
-            bash-4043  [01]   115.281647: wait_for_common <-wait_for_completion
-            bash-4043  [01]   115.281647: kthread_stop <-stop_machine_run
-            bash-4043  [01]   115.281648: init_waitqueue_head <-kthread_stop
-            bash-4043  [01]   115.281648: wake_up_process <-kthread_stop
-            bash-4043  [01]   115.281649: try_to_wake_up <-wake_up_process
-
-We can see that there's no more lock or preempt tracing.
-
-trace_pipe
-----------
-
-The trace_pipe outputs the same content as the trace file, but the effect
-on the tracing is different. Every read from trace_pipe is consumed.
-This means that subsequent reads will be different. The trace
-is live.
-
- # echo function > /debug/tracing/current_tracer
- # cat /debug/tracing/trace_pipe > /tmp/trace.out &
-[1] 4153
- # echo 1 > /debug/tracing/tracing_enabled
- # usleep 1
- # echo 0 > /debug/tracing/tracing_enabled
- # cat /debug/tracing/trace
-# tracer: function
-#
-#           TASK-PID   CPU#    TIMESTAMP  FUNCTION
-#              | |      |          |         |
-
- #
- # cat /tmp/trace.out
-            bash-4043  [00] 41.267106: finish_task_switch <-schedule
-            bash-4043  [00] 41.267106: hrtick_set <-schedule
-            bash-4043  [00] 41.267107: hrtick_clear <-hrtick_set
-            bash-4043  [00] 41.267108: wait_for_completion <-__stop_machine_run
-            bash-4043  [00] 41.267108: wait_for_common <-wait_for_completion
-            bash-4043  [00] 41.267109: kthread_stop <-stop_machine_run
-            bash-4043  [00] 41.267109: init_waitqueue_head <-kthread_stop
-            bash-4043  [00] 41.267110: wake_up_process <-kthread_stop
-            bash-4043  [00] 41.267110: try_to_wake_up <-wake_up_process
-            bash-4043  [00] 41.267111: select_task_rq_rt <-try_to_wake_up
-
-
-Note, reading the trace_pipe file will block until more input is added.
-By changing the tracer, trace_pipe will issue an EOF. We needed
-to set the function tracer _before_ we "cat" the trace_pipe file.
-
-
-trace entries
--------------
-
-Having too much or not enough data can be troublesome in diagnosing
-an issue in the kernel. The file buffer_size_kb is used to modify
-the size of the internal trace buffers. The number listed
-is the number of entries that can be recorded per CPU. To know
-the full size, multiply the number of possible CPUS with the
-number of entries.
-
- # cat /debug/tracing/buffer_size_kb
-1408 (units kilobytes)
-
-Note, to modify this, you must have tracing completely disabled. To do that,
-echo "nop" into the current_tracer. If the current_tracer is not set
-to "nop", an EINVAL error will be returned.
-
- # echo nop > /debug/tracing/current_tracer
- # echo 10000 > /debug/tracing/buffer_size_kb
- # cat /debug/tracing/buffer_size_kb
-10000 (units kilobytes)
-
-The number of pages which will be allocated is limited to a percentage
-of available memory. Allocating too much will produce an error.
-
- # echo 1000000000000 > /debug/tracing/buffer_size_kb
--bash: echo: write error: Cannot allocate memory
- # cat /debug/tracing/buffer_size_kb
-85
-
diff --git a/Documentation/hwmon/g760a b/Documentation/hwmon/g760a
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..e032eeb
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/hwmon/g760a
@@ -0,0 +1,36 @@
+Kernel driver g760a
+===================
+
+Supported chips:
+  * Global Mixed-mode Technology Inc. G760A
+    Prefix: 'g760a'
+    Datasheet: Publicly available at the GMT website
+      http://www.gmt.com.tw/datasheet/g760a.pdf
+
+Author: Herbert Valerio Riedel <hvr@gnu.org>
+
+Description
+-----------
+
+The GMT G760A Fan Speed PWM Controller is connected directly to a fan
+and performs closed-loop control of the fan speed.
+
+The fan speed is programmed by setting the period via 'pwm1' of two
+consecutive speed pulses. The period is defined in terms of clock
+cycle counts of an assumed 32kHz clock source.
+
+Setting a period of 0 stops the fan; setting the period to 255 sets
+fan to maximum speed.
+
+The measured fan rotation speed returned via 'fan1_input' is derived
+from the measured speed pulse period by assuming again a 32kHz clock
+source and a 2 pulse-per-revolution fan.
+
+The 'alarms' file provides access to the two alarm bits provided by
+the G760A chip's status register: Bit 0 is set when the actual fan
+speed differs more than 20% with respect to the programmed fan speed;
+bit 1 is set when fan speed is below 1920 RPM.
+
+The g760a driver will not update its values more frequently than every
+other second; reading them more often will do no harm, but will return
+'old' values.
diff --git a/Documentation/ia64/kvm.txt b/Documentation/ia64/kvm.txt
index 84f7cb3..ffb5c80 100644
--- a/Documentation/ia64/kvm.txt
+++ b/Documentation/ia64/kvm.txt
@@ -42,7 +42,7 @@
 		hg clone http://xenbits.xensource.com/ext/efi-vfirmware.hg
 	    you can get the firmware's binary in the directory of efi-vfirmware.hg/binaries.
 
-	(3) Rename the firware you owned to Flash.fd, and copy it to /usr/local/share/qemu
+	(3) Rename the firmware you owned to Flash.fd, and copy it to /usr/local/share/qemu
 
 4. Boot up Linux or Windows guests:
 	4.1 Create or install a image for guest boot. If you have xen experience, it should be easy.
diff --git a/Documentation/infiniband/ipoib.txt b/Documentation/infiniband/ipoib.txt
index 864ff32..6d40f00 100644
--- a/Documentation/infiniband/ipoib.txt
+++ b/Documentation/infiniband/ipoib.txt
@@ -24,6 +24,49 @@
   The P_Key for any interface is given by the "pkey" file, and the
   main interface for a subinterface is in "parent."
 
+Datagram vs Connected modes
+
+  The IPoIB driver supports two modes of operation: datagram and
+  connected.  The mode is set and read through an interface's
+  /sys/class/net/<intf name>/mode file.
+
+  In datagram mode, the IB UD (Unreliable Datagram) transport is used
+  and so the interface MTU has is equal to the IB L2 MTU minus the
+  IPoIB encapsulation header (4 bytes).  For example, in a typical IB
+  fabric with a 2K MTU, the IPoIB MTU will be 2048 - 4 = 2044 bytes.
+
+  In connected mode, the IB RC (Reliable Connected) transport is used.
+  Connected mode is to takes advantage of the connected nature of the
+  IB transport and allows an MTU up to the maximal IP packet size of
+  64K, which reduces the number of IP packets needed for handling
+  large UDP datagrams, TCP segments, etc and increases the performance
+  for large messages.
+
+  In connected mode, the interface's UD QP is still used for multicast
+  and communication with peers that don't support connected mode. In
+  this case, RX emulation of ICMP PMTU packets is used to cause the
+  networking stack to use the smaller UD MTU for these neighbours.
+
+Stateless offloads
+
+  If the IB HW supports IPoIB stateless offloads, IPoIB advertises
+  TCP/IP checksum and/or Large Send (LSO) offloading capability to the
+  network stack.
+
+  Large Receive (LRO) offloading is also implemented and may be turned
+  on/off using ethtool calls.  Currently LRO is supported only for
+  checksum offload capable devices.
+
+  Stateless offloads are supported only in datagram mode.  
+
+Interrupt moderation
+
+  If the underlying IB device supports CQ event moderation, one can
+  use ethtool to set interrupt mitigation parameters and thus reduce
+  the overhead incurred by handling interrupts.  The main code path of
+  IPoIB doesn't use events for TX completion signaling so only RX
+  moderation is supported.
+
 Debugging Information
 
   By compiling the IPoIB driver with CONFIG_INFINIBAND_IPOIB_DEBUG set
@@ -55,3 +98,5 @@
     http://ietf.org/rfc/rfc4391.txt 
   IP over InfiniBand (IPoIB) Architecture (RFC 4392)
     http://ietf.org/rfc/rfc4392.txt 
+  IP over InfiniBand: Connected Mode (RFC 4755)
+    http://ietf.org/rfc/rfc4755.txt
diff --git a/Documentation/input/rotary-encoder.txt b/Documentation/input/rotary-encoder.txt
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..435102a
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/input/rotary-encoder.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,101 @@
+rotary-encoder - a generic driver for GPIO connected devices
+Daniel Mack <daniel@caiaq.de>, Feb 2009
+
+0. Function
+-----------
+
+Rotary encoders are devices which are connected to the CPU or other
+peripherals with two wires. The outputs are phase-shifted by 90 degrees
+and by triggering on falling and rising edges, the turn direction can
+be determined.
+
+The phase diagram of these two outputs look like this:
+
+                  _____       _____       _____
+                 |     |     |     |     |     |
+  Channel A  ____|     |_____|     |_____|     |____
+
+                 :  :  :  :  :  :  :  :  :  :  :  :
+            __       _____       _____       _____
+              |     |     |     |     |     |     |
+  Channel B   |_____|     |_____|     |_____|     |__
+
+                 :  :  :  :  :  :  :  :  :  :  :  :
+  Event          a  b  c  d  a  b  c  d  a  b  c  d
+
+                |<-------->|
+	          one step
+
+
+For more information, please see
+	http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rotary_encoder
+
+
+1. Events / state machine
+-------------------------
+
+a) Rising edge on channel A, channel B in low state
+	This state is used to recognize a clockwise turn
+
+b) Rising edge on channel B, channel A in high state
+	When entering this state, the encoder is put into 'armed' state,
+	meaning that there it has seen half the way of a one-step transition.
+
+c) Falling edge on channel A, channel B in high state
+	This state is used to recognize a counter-clockwise turn
+
+d) Falling edge on channel B, channel A in low state
+	Parking position. If the encoder enters this state, a full transition
+	should have happend, unless it flipped back on half the way. The
+	'armed' state tells us about that.
+
+2. Platform requirements
+------------------------
+
+As there is no hardware dependent call in this driver, the platform it is
+used with must support gpiolib. Another requirement is that IRQs must be
+able to fire on both edges.
+
+
+3. Board integration
+--------------------
+
+To use this driver in your system, register a platform_device with the
+name 'rotary-encoder' and associate the IRQs and some specific platform
+data with it.
+
+struct rotary_encoder_platform_data is declared in
+include/linux/rotary-encoder.h and needs to be filled with the number of
+steps the encoder has and can carry information about externally inverted
+signals (because of used invertig buffer or other reasons).
+
+Because GPIO to IRQ mapping is platform specific, this information must
+be given in seperately to the driver. See the example below.
+
+---------<snip>---------
+
+/* board support file example */
+
+#include <linux/input.h>
+#include <linux/rotary_encoder.h>
+
+#define GPIO_ROTARY_A 1
+#define GPIO_ROTARY_B 2
+
+static struct rotary_encoder_platform_data my_rotary_encoder_info = {
+	.steps		= 24,
+	.axis		= ABS_X,
+	.gpio_a		= GPIO_ROTARY_A,
+	.gpio_b		= GPIO_ROTARY_B,
+	.inverted_a	= 0,
+	.inverted_b	= 0,
+};
+
+static struct platform_device rotary_encoder_device = {
+	.name		= "rotary-encoder",
+	.id		= 0,
+	.dev		= {
+		.platform_data = &my_rotary_encoder_info,
+	}
+};
+
diff --git a/Documentation/isdn/README.gigaset b/Documentation/isdn/README.gigaset
index 55b2852..02c0e93 100644
--- a/Documentation/isdn/README.gigaset
+++ b/Documentation/isdn/README.gigaset
@@ -61,24 +61,28 @@
      ---------------------
 2.1. Modules
      -------
-     To get the device working, you have to load the proper kernel module. You
-     can do this using
-         modprobe modulename
-     where modulename is ser_gigaset (M101), usb_gigaset (M105), or
-     bas_gigaset (direct USB connection to the base).
+     For the devices to work, the proper kernel modules have to be loaded.
+     This normally happens automatically when the system detects the USB
+     device (base, M105) or when the line discipline is attached (M101). It
+     can also be triggered manually using the modprobe(8) command, for example
+     for troubleshooting or to pass module parameters.
 
      The module ser_gigaset provides a serial line discipline N_GIGASET_M101
-     which drives the device through the regular serial line driver. To use it,
-     run the Gigaset M101 daemon "gigasetm101d" (also available from
-     http://sourceforge.net/projects/gigaset307x/) with the device file of the
-     RS232 port to the M101 as an argument, for example:
-	 gigasetm101d /dev/ttyS1
-     This will open the device file, set its line discipline to N_GIGASET_M101,
-     and then sleep in the background, keeping the device open so that the
-     line discipline remains active. To deactivate it, kill the daemon, for
-     example with
-	 killall gigasetm101d
-     before disconnecting the device.
+     which drives the device through the regular serial line driver. It must
+     be attached to the serial line to which the M101 is connected with the
+     ldattach(8) command (requires util-linux-ng release 2.14 or later), for
+     example:
+	 ldattach GIGASET_M101 /dev/ttyS1
+     This will open the device file, attach the line discipline to it, and
+     then sleep in the background, keeping the device open so that the line
+     discipline remains active. To deactivate it, kill the daemon, for example
+     with
+	 killall ldattach
+     before disconnecting the device. To have this happen automatically at
+     system startup/shutdown on an LSB compatible system, create and activate
+     an appropriate LSB startup script /etc/init.d/gigaset. (The init name
+     'gigaset' is officially assigned to this project by LANANA.)
+     Alternatively, just add the 'ldattach' command line to /etc/rc.local.
 
 2.2. Device nodes for user space programs
      ------------------------------------
@@ -194,10 +198,11 @@
      operation (for wireless access to the base), but are needed for access
      to the M105's own configuration mode (registration to the base, baudrate
      and line format settings, device status queries) via the gigacontr
-     utility. Their use is disabled in the driver by default for safety
-     reasons but can be enabled by setting the kernel configuration option
-     "Support for undocumented USB requests" (GIGASET_UNDOCREQ) to "Y" and
-     recompiling.
+     utility. Their use is controlled by the kernel configuration option
+     "Support for undocumented USB requests" (CONFIG_GIGASET_UNDOCREQ). If you
+     encounter error code -ENOTTY when trying to use some features of the
+     M105, try setting that option to "y" via 'make {x,menu}config' and
+     recompiling the driver.
 
 
 3.   Troubleshooting
@@ -228,6 +233,13 @@
      Solution:
         Select Unimodem mode for all DECT data adapters. (see section 2.4.)
 
+     Problem:
+        You want to configure your USB DECT data adapter (M105) but gigacontr
+        reports an error: "/dev/ttyGU0: Inappropriate ioctl for device".
+     Solution:
+        Recompile the usb_gigaset driver with the kernel configuration option
+        CONFIG_GIGASET_UNDOCREQ set to 'y'. (see section 2.6.)
+
 3.2. Telling the driver to provide more information
      ----------------------------------------------
      Building the driver with the "Gigaset debugging" kernel configuration
diff --git a/Documentation/kbuild/makefiles.txt b/Documentation/kbuild/makefiles.txt
index 51104f9..d4b0567 100644
--- a/Documentation/kbuild/makefiles.txt
+++ b/Documentation/kbuild/makefiles.txt
@@ -40,10 +40,16 @@
 	   --- 6.7 Custom kbuild commands
 	   --- 6.8 Preprocessing linker scripts
 
-	=== 7 Kbuild Variables
-	=== 8 Makefile language
-	=== 9 Credits
-	=== 10 TODO
+	=== 7 Kbuild syntax for exported headers
+		--- 7.1 header-y
+		--- 7.2 objhdr-y
+		--- 7.3 destination-y
+		--- 7.4 unifdef-y (deprecated)
+
+	=== 8 Kbuild Variables
+	=== 9 Makefile language
+	=== 10 Credits
+	=== 11 TODO
 
 === 1 Overview
 
@@ -1143,8 +1149,69 @@
 	The kbuild infrastructure for *lds file are used in several
 	architecture-specific files.
 
+=== 7 Kbuild syntax for exported headers
 
-=== 7 Kbuild Variables
+The kernel include a set of headers that is exported to userspace.
+Many headers can be exported as-is but other headers requires  a
+minimal pre-processing before they are ready for user-space.
+The pre-processing does:
+- drop kernel specific annotations
+- drop include of compiler.h
+- drop all sections that is kernel internat (guarded by ifdef __KERNEL__)
+
+Each relevant directory contain a file name "Kbuild" which specify the
+headers to be exported.
+See subsequent chapter for the syntax of the Kbuild file.
+
+	--- 7.1 header-y
+
+	header-y specify header files to be exported.
+
+		Example:
+			#include/linux/Kbuild
+			header-y += usb/
+			header-y += aio_abi.h
+
+	The convention is to list one file per line and
+	preferably in alphabetic order.
+
+	header-y also specify which subdirectories to visit.
+	A subdirectory is identified by a trailing '/' which
+	can be seen in the example above for the usb subdirectory.
+
+	Subdirectories are visited before their parent directories.
+
+	--- 7.2 objhdr-y
+
+	objhdr-y specifies generated files to be exported.
+	Generated files are special as they need to be looked
+	up in another directory when doing 'make O=...' builds.
+
+		Example:
+			#include/linux/Kbuild
+			objhdr-y += version.h
+
+	--- 7.3 destination-y
+
+	When an architecture have a set of exported headers that needs to be
+	exported to a different directory destination-y is used.
+	destination-y specify the destination directory for all exported
+	headers in the file where it is present.
+
+		Example:
+			#arch/xtensa/platforms/s6105/include/platform/Kbuild
+			destination-y := include/linux
+
+	In the example above all exported headers in the Kbuild file
+	will be located in the directory "include/linux" when exported.
+
+
+	--- 7.4 unifdef-y (deprecated)
+
+	unifdef-y is deprecated. A direct replacement is header-y.
+
+
+=== 8 Kbuild Variables
 
 The top Makefile exports the following variables:
 
@@ -1206,7 +1273,7 @@
 	INSTALL_MOD_STRIP will used as the option(s) to the strip command.
 
 
-=== 8 Makefile language
+=== 9 Makefile language
 
 The kernel Makefiles are designed to be run with GNU Make.  The Makefiles
 use only the documented features of GNU Make, but they do use many
@@ -1225,14 +1292,14 @@
 There are some cases where "=" is appropriate.  Usually, though, ":="
 is the right choice.
 
-=== 9 Credits
+=== 10 Credits
 
 Original version made by Michael Elizabeth Chastain, <mailto:mec@shout.net>
 Updates by Kai Germaschewski <kai@tp1.ruhr-uni-bochum.de>
 Updates by Sam Ravnborg <sam@ravnborg.org>
 Language QA by Jan Engelhardt <jengelh@gmx.de>
 
-=== 10 TODO
+=== 11 TODO
 
 - Describe how kbuild supports shipped files with _shipped.
 - Generating offset header files.
diff --git a/Documentation/kernel-parameters.txt b/Documentation/kernel-parameters.txt
index 240257d..6172e43 100644
--- a/Documentation/kernel-parameters.txt
+++ b/Documentation/kernel-parameters.txt
@@ -50,6 +50,7 @@
 	ISAPNP	ISA PnP code is enabled.
 	ISDN	Appropriate ISDN support is enabled.
 	JOY	Appropriate joystick support is enabled.
+	KMEMTRACE kmemtrace is enabled.
 	LIBATA  Libata driver is enabled
 	LP	Printer support is enabled.
 	LOOP	Loopback device support is enabled.
@@ -152,60 +153,6 @@
 			1,0: use 1st APIC table
 			default: 0
 
-	acpi_sleep=	[HW,ACPI] Sleep options
-			Format: { s3_bios, s3_mode, s3_beep, s4_nohwsig,
-				  old_ordering, s4_nonvs }
-			See Documentation/power/video.txt for information on
-			s3_bios and s3_mode.
-			s3_beep is for debugging; it makes the PC's speaker beep
-			as soon as the kernel's real-mode entry point is called.
-			s4_nohwsig prevents ACPI hardware signature from being
-			used during resume from hibernation.
-			old_ordering causes the ACPI 1.0 ordering of the _PTS
-			control method, with respect to putting devices into
-			low power states, to be enforced (the ACPI 2.0 ordering
-			of _PTS is used by default).
-			s4_nonvs prevents the kernel from saving/restoring the
-			ACPI NVS memory during hibernation.
-
-	acpi_sci=	[HW,ACPI] ACPI System Control Interrupt trigger mode
-			Format: { level | edge | high | low }
-
-	acpi_irq_balance [HW,ACPI]
-			ACPI will balance active IRQs
-			default in APIC mode
-
-	acpi_irq_nobalance [HW,ACPI]
-			ACPI will not move active IRQs (default)
-			default in PIC mode
-
-	acpi_irq_pci=	[HW,ACPI] If irq_balance, clear listed IRQs for
-			use by PCI
-			Format: <irq>,<irq>...
-
-	acpi_irq_isa=	[HW,ACPI] If irq_balance, mark listed IRQs used by ISA
-			Format: <irq>,<irq>...
-
-	acpi_no_auto_ssdt	[HW,ACPI] Disable automatic loading of SSDT
-
-	acpi_os_name=	[HW,ACPI] Tell ACPI BIOS the name of the OS
-			Format: To spoof as Windows 98: ="Microsoft Windows"
-
-	acpi_osi=	[HW,ACPI] Modify list of supported OS interface strings
-			acpi_osi="string1"	# add string1 -- only one string
-			acpi_osi="!string2"	# remove built-in string2
-			acpi_osi=		# disable all strings
-
-	acpi_serialize	[HW,ACPI] force serialization of AML methods
-
-	acpi_skip_timer_override [HW,ACPI]
-			Recognize and ignore IRQ0/pin2 Interrupt Override.
-			For broken nForce2 BIOS resulting in XT-PIC timer.
-	acpi_use_timer_override [HW,ACPI]
-			Use timer override. For some broken Nvidia NF5 boards
-			that require a timer override, but don't have
-			HPET
-
 	acpi_backlight=	[HW,ACPI]
 			acpi_backlight=vendor
 			acpi_backlight=video
@@ -213,11 +160,6 @@
 			(e.g. thinkpad_acpi, sony_acpi, etc.) instead
 			of the ACPI video.ko driver.
 
-	acpi_display_output=	[HW,ACPI]
-			acpi_display_output=vendor
-			acpi_display_output=video
-			See above.
-
 	acpi.debug_layer=	[HW,ACPI,ACPI_DEBUG]
 	acpi.debug_level=	[HW,ACPI,ACPI_DEBUG]
 			Format: <int>
@@ -246,6 +188,41 @@
 			unusable.  The "log_buf_len" parameter may be useful
 			if you need to capture more output.
 
+	acpi_display_output=	[HW,ACPI]
+			acpi_display_output=vendor
+			acpi_display_output=video
+			See above.
+
+	acpi_irq_balance [HW,ACPI]
+			ACPI will balance active IRQs
+			default in APIC mode
+
+	acpi_irq_nobalance [HW,ACPI]
+			ACPI will not move active IRQs (default)
+			default in PIC mode
+
+	acpi_irq_isa=	[HW,ACPI] If irq_balance, mark listed IRQs used by ISA
+			Format: <irq>,<irq>...
+
+	acpi_irq_pci=	[HW,ACPI] If irq_balance, clear listed IRQs for
+			use by PCI
+			Format: <irq>,<irq>...
+
+	acpi_no_auto_ssdt	[HW,ACPI] Disable automatic loading of SSDT
+
+	acpi_os_name=	[HW,ACPI] Tell ACPI BIOS the name of the OS
+			Format: To spoof as Windows 98: ="Microsoft Windows"
+
+	acpi_osi=	[HW,ACPI] Modify list of supported OS interface strings
+			acpi_osi="string1"	# add string1 -- only one string
+			acpi_osi="!string2"	# remove built-in string2
+			acpi_osi=		# disable all strings
+
+	acpi_pm_good	[X86-32,X86-64]
+			Override the pmtimer bug detection: force the kernel
+			to assume that this machine's pmtimer latches its value
+			and always returns good values.
+
  	acpi.power_nocheck=	[HW,ACPI]
  			Format: 1/0 enable/disable the check of power state.
  			On some bogus BIOS the _PSC object/_STA object of
@@ -254,26 +231,21 @@
  			power state again in power transition.
  			1 : disable the power state check
 
-	acpi_pm_good	[X86-32,X86-64]
-			Override the pmtimer bug detection: force the kernel
-			to assume that this machine's pmtimer latches its value
-			and always returns good values.
-
-	agp=		[AGP]
-			{ off | try_unsupported }
-			off: disable AGP support
-			try_unsupported: try to drive unsupported chipsets
-				(may crash computer or cause data corruption)
-
-	enable_timer_pin_1 [i386,x86-64]
-			Enable PIN 1 of APIC timer
-			Can be useful to work around chipset bugs
-			(in particular on some ATI chipsets).
-			The kernel tries to set a reasonable default.
-
-	disable_timer_pin_1 [i386,x86-64]
-			Disable PIN 1 of APIC timer
-			Can be useful to work around chipset bugs.
+	acpi_enforce_resources=	[ACPI]
+			{ strict | lax | no }
+			Check for resource conflicts between native drivers
+			and ACPI OperationRegions (SystemIO and SystemMemory
+			only). IO ports and memory declared in ACPI might be
+			used by the ACPI subsystem in arbitrary AML code and
+			can interfere with legacy drivers.
+			strict (default): access to resources claimed by ACPI
+			is denied; legacy drivers trying to access reserved
+			resources will fail to bind to device using them.
+			lax: access to resources claimed by ACPI is allowed;
+			legacy drivers trying to access reserved resources
+			will bind successfully but a warning message is logged.
+			no: ACPI OperationRegions are not marked as reserved,
+			no further checks are performed.
 
 	ad1848=		[HW,OSS]
 			Format: <io>,<irq>,<dma>,<dma2>,<type>
@@ -288,6 +260,12 @@
 			Format: <io>,<irq>,<dma>,<mss_io>,<mpu_io>,<mpu_irq>
 			See also header of sound/oss/aedsp16.c.
 
+	agp=		[AGP]
+			{ off | try_unsupported }
+			off: disable AGP support
+			try_unsupported: try to drive unsupported chipsets
+				(may crash computer or cause data corruption)
+
 	aha152x=	[HW,SCSI]
 			See Documentation/scsi/aha152x.txt.
 
@@ -415,12 +393,6 @@
 			possible to determine what the correct size should be.
 			This option provides an override for these situations.
 
-	security=	[SECURITY] Choose a security module to enable at boot.
-			If this boot parameter is not specified, only the first
-			security module asking for security registration will be
-			loaded. An invalid security module name will be treated
-			as if no module has been chosen.
-
 	capability.disable=
 			[SECURITY] Disable capabilities.  This would normally
 			be used only if an alternative security model is to be
@@ -492,24 +464,6 @@
 			Range: 0 - 8192
 			Default: 64
 
-	dma_debug=off	If the kernel is compiled with DMA_API_DEBUG support
-			this option disables the debugging code at boot.
-
-	dma_debug_entries=<number>
-			This option allows to tune the number of preallocated
-			entries for DMA-API debugging code. One entry is
-			required per DMA-API allocation. Use this if the
-			DMA-API debugging code disables itself because the
-			architectural default is too low.
-
-	hpet=		[X86-32,HPET] option to control HPET usage
-			Format: { enable (default) | disable | force |
-				verbose }
-			disable: disable HPET and use PIT instead
-			force: allow force enabled of undocumented chips (ICH4,
-			VIA, nVidia)
-			verbose: show contents of HPET registers during setup
-
 	com20020=	[HW,NET] ARCnet - COM20020 chipset
 			Format:
 			<io>[,<irq>[,<nodeID>[,<backplane>[,<ckp>[,<timeout>]]]]]
@@ -553,23 +507,6 @@
 			console=brl,ttyS0
 		For now, only VisioBraille is supported.
 
-	earlycon=	[KNL] Output early console device and options.
-		uart[8250],io,<addr>[,options]
-		uart[8250],mmio,<addr>[,options]
-			Start an early, polled-mode console on the 8250/16550
-			UART at the specified I/O port or MMIO address.
-			The options are the same as for ttyS, above.
-
-	no_console_suspend
-			[HW] Never suspend the console
-			Disable suspending of consoles during suspend and
-			hibernate operations.  Once disabled, debugging
-			messages can reach various consoles while the rest
-			of the system is being put to sleep (ie, while
-			debugging driver suspend/resume hooks).  This may
-			not work reliably with all consoles, but is known
-			to work with serial and VGA consoles.
-
 	coredump_filter=
 			[KNL] Change the default value for
 			/proc/<pid>/coredump_filter.
@@ -617,36 +554,22 @@
 
 	debug_objects	[KNL] Enable object debugging
 
+	no_debug_objects
+			[KNL] Disable object debugging
+
 	debugpat	[X86] Enable PAT debugging
 
 	decnet.addr=	[HW,NET]
 			Format: <area>[,<node>]
 			See also Documentation/networking/decnet.txt.
 
-	vt.default_blu=	[VT]
-			Format: <blue0>,<blue1>,<blue2>,...,<blue15>
-			Change the default blue palette of the console.
-			This is a 16-member array composed of values
-			ranging from 0-255.
-
-	vt.default_grn=	[VT]
-			Format: <green0>,<green1>,<green2>,...,<green15>
-			Change the default green palette of the console.
-			This is a 16-member array composed of values
-			ranging from 0-255.
-
-	vt.default_red=	[VT]
-			Format: <red0>,<red1>,<red2>,...,<red15>
-			Change the default red palette of the console.
-			This is a 16-member array composed of values
-			ranging from 0-255.
-
-	vt.default_utf8=
-			[VT]
-			Format=<0|1>
-			Set system-wide default UTF-8 mode for all tty's.
-			Default is 1, i.e. UTF-8 mode is enabled for all
-			newly opened terminals.
+	default_hugepagesz=
+			[same as hugepagesz=] The size of the default
+			HugeTLB page size. This is the size represented by
+			the legacy /proc/ hugepages APIs, used for SHM, and
+			default size when mounting hugetlbfs filesystems.
+			Defaults to the default architecture's huge page size
+			if not specified.
 
 	dhash_entries=	[KNL]
 			Set number of hash buckets for dentry cache.
@@ -659,27 +582,9 @@
 			Documentation/serial/digiepca.txt.
 
 	disable_mtrr_cleanup [X86]
-	enable_mtrr_cleanup [X86]
 			The kernel tries to adjust MTRR layout from continuous
 			to discrete, to make X server driver able to add WB
-			entry later. This parameter enables/disables that.
-
-	mtrr_chunk_size=nn[KMG] [X86]
-			used for mtrr cleanup. It is largest continous chunk
-			that could hold holes aka. UC entries.
-
-	mtrr_gran_size=nn[KMG] [X86]
-			Used for mtrr cleanup. It is granularity of mtrr block.
-			Default is 1.
-			Large value could prevent small alignment from
-			using up MTRRs.
-
-	mtrr_spare_reg_nr=n [X86]
-			Format: <integer>
-			Range: 0,7 : spare reg number
-			Default : 1
-			Used for mtrr cleanup. It is spare mtrr entries number.
-			Set to 2 or more if your graphical card needs more.
+			entry later. This parameter disables that.
 
 	disable_mtrr_trim [X86, Intel and AMD only]
 			By default the kernel will trim any uncacheable
@@ -687,12 +592,38 @@
 			MTRR settings.  This parameter disables that behavior,
 			possibly causing your machine to run very slowly.
 
+	disable_timer_pin_1 [i386,x86-64]
+			Disable PIN 1 of APIC timer
+			Can be useful to work around chipset bugs.
+
 	dmasound=	[HW,OSS] Sound subsystem buffers
 
+	dma_debug=off	If the kernel is compiled with DMA_API_DEBUG support,
+			this option disables the debugging code at boot.
+
+	dma_debug_entries=<number>
+			This option allows to tune the number of preallocated
+			entries for DMA-API debugging code. One entry is
+			required per DMA-API allocation. Use this if the
+			DMA-API debugging code disables itself because the
+			architectural default is too low.
+
 	dscc4.setup=	[NET]
 
 	dtc3181e=	[HW,SCSI]
 
+	dynamic_printk	Enables pr_debug()/dev_dbg() calls if
+			CONFIG_DYNAMIC_PRINTK_DEBUG has been enabled.
+			These can also be switched on/off via
+			<debugfs>/dynamic_printk/modules
+
+	earlycon=	[KNL] Output early console device and options.
+		uart[8250],io,<addr>[,options]
+		uart[8250],mmio,<addr>[,options]
+			Start an early, polled-mode console on the 8250/16550
+			UART at the specified I/O port or MMIO address.
+			The options are the same as for ttyS, above.
+
 	earlyprintk=	[X86-32,X86-64,SH,BLACKFIN]
 			earlyprintk=vga
 			earlyprintk=serial[,ttySn[,baudrate]]
@@ -734,6 +665,17 @@
 			pass this option to capture kernel.
 			See Documentation/kdump/kdump.txt for details.
 
+	enable_mtrr_cleanup [X86]
+			The kernel tries to adjust MTRR layout from continuous
+			to discrete, to make X server driver able to add WB
+			entry later. This parameter enables that.
+
+	enable_timer_pin_1 [i386,x86-64]
+			Enable PIN 1 of APIC timer
+			Can be useful to work around chipset bugs
+			(in particular on some ATI chipsets).
+			The kernel tries to set a reasonable default.
+
 	enforcing	[SELINUX] Set initial enforcing status.
 			Format: {"0" | "1"}
 			See security/selinux/Kconfig help text.
@@ -821,6 +763,16 @@
 	hisax=		[HW,ISDN]
 			See Documentation/isdn/README.HiSax.
 
+	hlt		[BUGS=ARM,SH]
+
+	hpet=		[X86-32,HPET] option to control HPET usage
+			Format: { enable (default) | disable | force |
+				verbose }
+			disable: disable HPET and use PIT instead
+			force: allow force enabled of undocumented chips (ICH4,
+				VIA, nVidia)
+			verbose: show contents of HPET registers during setup
+
 	hugepages=	[HW,X86-32,IA-64] HugeTLB pages to allocate at boot.
 	hugepagesz=	[HW,IA-64,PPC,X86-64] The size of the HugeTLB pages.
 			On x86-64 and powerpc, this option can be specified
@@ -830,15 +782,6 @@
 			(when the CPU supports the "pdpe1gb" cpuinfo flag)
 			Note that 1GB pages can only be allocated at boot time
 			using hugepages= and not freed afterwards.
-	default_hugepagesz=
-			[same as hugepagesz=] The size of the default
-			HugeTLB page size. This is the size represented by
-			the legacy /proc/ hugepages APIs, used for SHM, and
-			default size when mounting hugetlbfs filesystems.
-			Defaults to the default architecture's huge page size
-			if not specified.
-
-	hlt		[BUGS=ARM,SH]
 
 	hvc_iucv=	[S390] Number of z/VM IUCV hypervisor console (HVC)
 			       terminal devices. Valid values: 0..8
@@ -899,6 +842,9 @@
 	idebus=		[HW] (E)IDE subsystem - VLB/PCI bus speed
 			See Documentation/ide/ide.txt.
 
+	ide-pci-generic.all-generic-ide [HW] (E)IDE subsystem
+			Claim all unknown PCI IDE storage controllers.
+
 	idle=		[X86]
 			Format: idle=poll, idle=mwait, idle=halt, idle=nomwait
 			Poll forces a polling idle loop that can slightly
@@ -914,9 +860,6 @@
 			In such case C2/C3 won't be used again.
 			idle=nomwait: Disable mwait for CPU C-states
 
-	ide-pci-generic.all-generic-ide [HW] (E)IDE subsystem
-			Claim all unknown PCI IDE storage controllers.
-
 	ignore_loglevel	[KNL]
 			Ignore loglevel setting - this will print /all/
 			kernel messages to the console. Useful for debugging.
@@ -950,25 +893,6 @@
 	inport.irq=	[HW] Inport (ATI XL and Microsoft) busmouse driver
 			Format: <irq>
 
-	inttest=	[IA64]
-
-	iomem=		Disable strict checking of access to MMIO memory
-		strict	regions from userspace.
-		relaxed
-
-	iommu=		[x86]
-		off
-		force
-		noforce
-		biomerge
-		panic
-		nopanic
-		merge
-		nomerge
-		forcesac
-		soft
-
-
 	intel_iommu=	[DMAR] Intel IOMMU driver (DMAR) option
 		on
 			Enable intel iommu driver.
@@ -992,6 +916,28 @@
 			result in a hardware IOTLB flush operation as opposed
 			to batching them for performance.
 
+	inttest=	[IA64]
+
+	iomem=		Disable strict checking of access to MMIO memory
+		strict	regions from userspace.
+		relaxed
+
+	iommu=		[x86]
+		off
+		force
+		noforce
+		biomerge
+		panic
+		nopanic
+		merge
+		nomerge
+		forcesac
+		soft
+
+	io7=		[HW] IO7 for Marvel based alpha systems
+			See comment before marvel_specify_io7 in
+			arch/alpha/kernel/core_marvel.c.
+
 	io_delay=	[X86-32,X86-64] I/O delay method
 		0x80
 			Standard port 0x80 based delay
@@ -1002,10 +948,6 @@
 		none
 			No delay
 
-	io7=		[HW] IO7 for Marvel based alpha systems
-			See comment before marvel_specify_io7 in
-			arch/alpha/kernel/core_marvel.c.
-
 	ip=		[IP_PNP]
 			See Documentation/filesystems/nfsroot.txt.
 
@@ -1016,12 +958,6 @@
 	ips=		[HW,SCSI] Adaptec / IBM ServeRAID controller
 			See header of drivers/scsi/ips.c.
 
-	ports=		[IP_VS_FTP] IPVS ftp helper module
-			Default is 21.
-			Up to 8 (IP_VS_APP_MAX_PORTS) ports
-			may be specified.
-			Format: <port>,<port>....
-
 	irqfixup	[HW]
 			When an interrupt is not handled search all handlers
 			for it. Intended to get systems with badly broken
@@ -1062,6 +998,8 @@
 	js=		[HW,JOY] Analog joystick
 			See Documentation/input/joystick.txt.
 
+	keepinitrd	[HW,ARM]
+
 	kernelcore=nn[KMG]	[KNL,X86-32,IA-64,PPC,X86-64] This parameter
 			specifies the amount of memory usable by the kernel
 			for non-movable allocations.  The requested amount is
@@ -1078,20 +1016,14 @@
 			use the HighMem zone if it exists, and the Normal
 			zone if it does not.
 
-	movablecore=nn[KMG]	[KNL,X86-32,IA-64,PPC,X86-64] This parameter
-			is similar to kernelcore except it specifies the
-			amount of memory used for migratable allocations.
-			If both kernelcore and movablecore is specified,
-			then kernelcore will be at *least* the specified
-			value but may be more. If movablecore on its own
-			is specified, the administrator must be careful
-			that the amount of memory usable for all allocations
-			is not too small.
+	kmemtrace.enable=	[KNL,KMEMTRACE] Format: { yes | no }
+				Controls whether kmemtrace is enabled
+				at boot-time.
 
-	keepinitrd	[HW,ARM]
-
-	kstack=N	[X86-32,X86-64] Print N words from the kernel stack
-			in oops dumps.
+	kmemtrace.subbufs=n	[KNL,KMEMTRACE] Overrides the number of
+			subbufs kmemtrace's relay channel has. Set this
+			higher than default (KMEMTRACE_N_SUBBUFS in code) if
+			you experience buffer overruns.
 
 	kgdboc=		[HW] kgdb over consoles.
 			Requires a tty driver that supports console polling.
@@ -1102,6 +1034,9 @@
 			Configure the RouterBoard 532 series on-chip
 			Ethernet adapter MAC address.
 
+	kstack=N	[X86-32,X86-64] Print N words from the kernel stack
+			in oops dumps.
+
 	l2cr=		[PPC]
 
 	l3cr=		[PPC]
@@ -1247,9 +1182,8 @@
 			(machvec) in a generic kernel.
 			Example: machvec=hpzx1_swiotlb
 
-	max_loop=	[LOOP] Maximum number of loopback devices that can
-			be mounted
-			Format: <1-256>
+	max_addr=nn[KMG]	[KNL,BOOT,ia64] All physical memory greater
+			than or equal to this physical address is ignored.
 
 	maxcpus=	[SMP] Maximum number of processors that	an SMP kernel
 			should make use of.  maxcpus=n : n >= 0 limits the
@@ -1257,8 +1191,9 @@
 			it is equivalent to "nosmp", which also disables
 			the IO APIC.
 
-	max_addr=nn[KMG]	[KNL,BOOT,ia64] All physical memory greater than
-			or equal to this physical address is ignored.
+	max_loop=	[LOOP] Maximum number of loopback devices that can
+			be mounted
+			Format: <1-256>
 
 	max_luns=	[SCSI] Maximum number of LUNs to probe.
 			Should be between 1 and 2^32-1.
@@ -1385,6 +1320,16 @@
 	mousedev.yres=	[MOUSE] Vertical screen resolution, used for devices
 			reporting absolute coordinates, such as tablets
 
+	movablecore=nn[KMG]	[KNL,X86-32,IA-64,PPC,X86-64] This parameter
+			is similar to kernelcore except it specifies the
+			amount of memory used for migratable allocations.
+			If both kernelcore and movablecore is specified,
+			then kernelcore will be at *least* the specified
+			value but may be more. If movablecore on its own
+			is specified, the administrator must be careful
+			that the amount of memory usable for all allocations
+			is not too small.
+
 	mpu401=		[HW,OSS]
 			Format: <io>,<irq>
 
@@ -1406,6 +1351,23 @@
 			[HW] Make the MicroTouch USB driver use raw coordinates
 			('y', default) or cooked coordinates ('n')
 
+	mtrr_chunk_size=nn[KMG] [X86]
+			used for mtrr cleanup. It is largest continous chunk
+			that could hold holes aka. UC entries.
+
+	mtrr_gran_size=nn[KMG] [X86]
+			Used for mtrr cleanup. It is granularity of mtrr block.
+			Default is 1.
+			Large value could prevent small alignment from
+			using up MTRRs.
+
+	mtrr_spare_reg_nr=n [X86]
+			Format: <integer>
+			Range: 0,7 : spare reg number
+			Default : 1
+			Used for mtrr cleanup. It is spare mtrr entries number.
+			Set to 2 or more if your graphical card needs more.
+
 	n2=		[NET] SDL Inc. RISCom/N2 synchronous serial card
 
 	NCR_D700=	[HW,SCSI]
@@ -1466,11 +1428,13 @@
 			0 - turn nmi_watchdog off
 			1 - use the IO-APIC timer for the NMI watchdog
 			2 - use the local APIC for the NMI watchdog using
-			a performance counter. Note: This will use one performance
-			counter and the local APIC's performance vector.
-			When panic is specified panic when an NMI watchdog timeout occurs.
-			This is useful when you use a panic=... timeout and need the box
-			quickly up again.
+			a performance counter. Note: This will use one
+			performance counter and the local APIC's performance
+			vector.
+			When panic is specified, panic when an NMI watchdog
+			timeout occurs.
+			This is useful when you use a panic=... timeout and
+			need the box quickly up again.
 			Instead of 1 and 2 it is possible to use the following
 			symbolic names: lapic and ioapic
 			Example: nmi_watchdog=2 or nmi_watchdog=panic,lapic
@@ -1479,6 +1443,16 @@
 			emulation library even if a 387 maths coprocessor
 			is present.
 
+	no_console_suspend
+			[HW] Never suspend the console
+			Disable suspending of consoles during suspend and
+			hibernate operations.  Once disabled, debugging
+			messages can reach various consoles while the rest
+			of the system is being put to sleep (ie, while
+			debugging driver suspend/resume hooks).  This may
+			not work reliably with all consoles, but is known
+			to work with serial and VGA consoles.
+
 	noaliencache	[MM, NUMA, SLAB] Disables the allocation of alien
 			caches in the slab allocator.  Saves per-node memory,
 			but will impact performance.
@@ -1493,6 +1467,8 @@
 
 	nocache		[ARM]
 
+	noclflush	[BUGS=X86] Don't use the CLFLUSH instruction
+
 	nodelayacct	[KNL] Disable per-task delay accounting
 
 	nodisconnect	[HW,SCSI,M68K] Disables SCSI disconnects.
@@ -1521,9 +1497,9 @@
 			register save and restore. The kernel will only save
 			legacy floating-point registers on task switch.
 
-	noclflush	[BUGS=X86] Don't use the CLFLUSH instruction
-
-	nohlt		[BUGS=ARM,SH]
+	nohlt		[BUGS=ARM,SH] Tells the kernel that the sleep(SH) or
+			wfi(ARM) instruction doesn't work correctly and not to
+			use it. This is also useful when using JTAG debugger.
 
 	no-hlt		[BUGS=X86-32] Tells the kernel that the hlt
 			instruction doesn't work correctly and not to
@@ -1544,6 +1520,8 @@
 			Valid arguments: on, off
 			Default: on
 
+	noiotrap	[SH] Disables trapped I/O port accesses.
+
 	noirqdebug	[X86-32] Disables the code which attempts to detect and
 			disable unhandled interrupt sources.
 
@@ -1563,12 +1541,6 @@
 
 	nolapic_timer	[X86-32,APIC] Do not use the local APIC timer.
 
-	nox2apic	[X86-64,APIC] Do not enable x2APIC mode.
-
-	x2apic_phys	[X86-64,APIC] Use x2apic physical mode instead of
-			default x2apic cluster mode on platforms
-			supporting x2apic.
-
 	noltlbs		[PPC] Do not use large page/tlb entries for kernel
 			lowmem mapping on PPC40x.
 
@@ -1579,6 +1551,9 @@
 	nomfgpt		[X86-32] Disable Multi-Function General Purpose
 			Timer usage (for AMD Geode machines).
 
+	norandmaps	Don't use address space randomization.  Equivalent to
+			echo 0 > /proc/sys/kernel/randomize_va_space
+
 	noreplace-paravirt	[X86-32,PV_OPS] Don't patch paravirt_ops
 
 	noreplace-smp	[X86-32,SMP] Don't replace SMP instructions
@@ -1603,7 +1578,7 @@
 	nosoftlockup	[KNL] Disable the soft-lockup detector.
 
 	noswapaccount	[KNL] Disable accounting of swap in memory resource
-			controller. (See Documentation/controllers/memory.txt)
+			controller. (See Documentation/cgroups/memory.txt)
 
 	nosync		[HW,M68K] Disables sync negotiation for all devices.
 
@@ -1617,13 +1592,13 @@
 			purges which is reported from either PAL_VM_SUMMARY or
 			SAL PALO.
 
+	nr_uarts=	[SERIAL] maximum number of UARTs to be registered.
+
 	numa_zonelist_order= [KNL, BOOT] Select zonelist order for NUMA.
 			one of ['zone', 'node', 'default'] can be specified
 			This can be set from sysctl after boot.
 			See Documentation/sysctl/vm.txt for details.
 
-	nr_uarts=	[SERIAL] maximum number of UARTs to be registered.
-
 	ohci1394_dma=early	[HW] enable debugging via the ohci1394 driver.
 			See Documentation/debugging-via-ohci1394.txt for more
 			info.
@@ -1872,6 +1847,14 @@
 	printk.time=	Show timing data prefixed to each printk message line
 			Format: <bool>  (1/Y/y=enable, 0/N/n=disable)
 
+	processor.max_cstate=	[HW,ACPI]
+			Limit processor to maximum C-state
+			max_cstate=9 overrides any DMI blacklist limit.
+
+	processor.nocst	[HW,ACPI]
+			Ignore the _CST method to determine C-states,
+			instead using the legacy FADT method
+
 	profile=	[KNL] Enable kernel profiling via /proc/profile
 			Format: [schedule,]<number>
 			Param: "schedule" - profile schedule points.
@@ -1881,14 +1864,6 @@
 				Requires CONFIG_SCHEDSTATS
 			Param: "kvm" - profile VM exits.
 
-	processor.max_cstate=	[HW,ACPI]
-			Limit processor to maximum C-state
-			max_cstate=9 overrides any DMI blacklist limit.
-
-	processor.nocst	[HW,ACPI]
-			Ignore the _CST method to determine C-states,
-			instead using the legacy FADT method
-
 	prompt_ramdisk=	[RAM] List of RAM disks to prompt for floppy disk
 			before loading.
 			See Documentation/blockdev/ramdisk.txt.
@@ -1953,7 +1928,7 @@
 
 	relax_domain_level=
 			[KNL, SMP] Set scheduler's default relax_domain_level.
-			See Documentation/cpusets.txt.
+			See Documentation/cgroups/cpusets.txt.
 
 	reserve=	[KNL,BUGS] Force the kernel to ignore some iomem area
 
@@ -2042,7 +2017,13 @@
 			allowing boot to proceed.  none ignores them, expecting
 			user space to do the scan.
 
-	selinux		[SELINUX] Disable or enable SELinux at boot time.
+	security=	[SECURITY] Choose a security module to enable at boot.
+			If this boot parameter is not specified, only the first
+			security module asking for security registration will be
+			loaded. An invalid security module name will be treated
+			as if no module has been chosen.
+
+	selinux=	[SELINUX] Disable or enable SELinux at boot time.
 			Format: { "0" | "1" }
 			See security/selinux/Kconfig help text.
 			0 -- disable.
@@ -2362,6 +2343,8 @@
 
 	tp720=		[HW,PS2]
 
+	trace_buf_size=nn[KMG] [ftrace] will set tracing buffer size.
+
 	trix=		[HW,OSS] MediaTrix AudioTrix Pro
 			Format:
 			<io>,<irq>,<dma>,<dma2>,<sb_io>,<sb_irq>,<sb_dma>,<mpu_io>,<mpu_irq>
@@ -2464,9 +2447,6 @@
 					medium is write-protected).
 			Example: quirks=0419:aaf5:rl,0421:0433:rc
 
-	add_efi_memmap	[EFI; x86-32,X86-64] Include EFI memory map in
-			kernel's map of available physical RAM.
-
 	vdso=		[X86-32,SH,x86-64]
 			vdso=2: enable compat VDSO (default with COMPAT_VDSO)
 			vdso=1: enable VDSO (default)
@@ -2505,6 +2485,31 @@
 	vmpoff=		[KNL,S390] Perform z/VM CP command after power off.
 			Format: <command>
 
+	vt.default_blu=	[VT]
+			Format: <blue0>,<blue1>,<blue2>,...,<blue15>
+			Change the default blue palette of the console.
+			This is a 16-member array composed of values
+			ranging from 0-255.
+
+	vt.default_grn=	[VT]
+			Format: <green0>,<green1>,<green2>,...,<green15>
+			Change the default green palette of the console.
+			This is a 16-member array composed of values
+			ranging from 0-255.
+
+	vt.default_red=	[VT]
+			Format: <red0>,<red1>,<red2>,...,<red15>
+			Change the default red palette of the console.
+			This is a 16-member array composed of values
+			ranging from 0-255.
+
+	vt.default_utf8=
+			[VT]
+			Format=<0|1>
+			Set system-wide default UTF-8 mode for all tty's.
+			Default is 1, i.e. UTF-8 mode is enabled for all
+			newly opened terminals.
+
 	waveartist=	[HW,OSS]
 			Format: <io>,<irq>,<dma>,<dma2>
 
@@ -2517,6 +2522,10 @@
 	wdt=		[WDT] Watchdog
 			See Documentation/watchdog/wdt.txt.
 
+	x2apic_phys	[X86-64,APIC] Use x2apic physical mode instead of
+			default x2apic cluster mode on platforms
+			supporting x2apic.
+
 	xd=		[HW,XT] Original XT pre-IDE (RLL encoded) disks.
 	xd_geo=		See header of drivers/block/xd.c.
 
@@ -2524,9 +2533,6 @@
 			Format:
 			<irq>,<irq_mask>,<io>,<full_duplex>,<do_sound>,<lockup_hack>[,<irq2>[,<irq3>[,<irq4>]]]
 
-	norandmaps	Don't use address space randomization.  Equivalent to
-			echo 0 > /proc/sys/kernel/randomize_va_space
-
 ______________________________________________________________________
 
 TODO:
diff --git a/Documentation/kprobes.txt b/Documentation/kprobes.txt
index 48b3de9..1e7a769 100644
--- a/Documentation/kprobes.txt
+++ b/Documentation/kprobes.txt
@@ -212,7 +212,9 @@
 is single-stepped, Kprobe calls kp->post_handler.  If a fault
 occurs during execution of kp->pre_handler or kp->post_handler,
 or during single-stepping of the probed instruction, Kprobes calls
-kp->fault_handler.  Any or all handlers can be NULL.
+kp->fault_handler.  Any or all handlers can be NULL. If kp->flags
+is set KPROBE_FLAG_DISABLED, that kp will be registered but disabled,
+so, it's handlers aren't hit until calling enable_kprobe(kp).
 
 NOTE:
 1. With the introduction of the "symbol_name" field to struct kprobe,
@@ -363,6 +365,26 @@
 incorrect probes. However, other probes in the array are
 unregistered correctly.
 
+4.7 disable_*probe
+
+#include <linux/kprobes.h>
+int disable_kprobe(struct kprobe *kp);
+int disable_kretprobe(struct kretprobe *rp);
+int disable_jprobe(struct jprobe *jp);
+
+Temporarily disables the specified *probe. You can enable it again by using
+enable_*probe(). You must specify the probe which has been registered.
+
+4.8 enable_*probe
+
+#include <linux/kprobes.h>
+int enable_kprobe(struct kprobe *kp);
+int enable_kretprobe(struct kretprobe *rp);
+int enable_jprobe(struct jprobe *jp);
+
+Enables *probe which has been disabled by disable_*probe(). You must specify
+the probe which has been registered.
+
 5. Kprobes Features and Limitations
 
 Kprobes allows multiple probes at the same address.  Currently,
@@ -500,10 +522,14 @@
 is also specified. Following columns show probe status. If the probe is on
 a virtual address that is no longer valid (module init sections, module
 virtual addresses that correspond to modules that've been unloaded),
-such probes are marked with [GONE].
+such probes are marked with [GONE]. If the probe is temporarily disabled,
+such probes are marked with [DISABLED].
 
-/debug/kprobes/enabled: Turn kprobes ON/OFF
+/debug/kprobes/enabled: Turn kprobes ON/OFF forcibly.
 
-Provides a knob to globally turn registered kprobes ON or OFF. By default,
-all kprobes are enabled. By echoing "0" to this file, all registered probes
-will be disarmed, till such time a "1" is echoed to this file.
+Provides a knob to globally and forcibly turn registered kprobes ON or OFF.
+By default, all kprobes are enabled. By echoing "0" to this file, all
+registered probes will be disarmed, till such time a "1" is echoed to this
+file. Note that this knob just disarms and arms all kprobes and doesn't
+change each probe's disabling state. This means that disabled kprobes (marked
+[DISABLED]) will be not enabled if you turn ON all kprobes by this knob.
diff --git a/Documentation/laptops/acer-wmi.txt b/Documentation/laptops/acer-wmi.txt
index 2b3a6b5..5ee2a02 100644
--- a/Documentation/laptops/acer-wmi.txt
+++ b/Documentation/laptops/acer-wmi.txt
@@ -1,9 +1,9 @@
 Acer Laptop WMI Extras Driver
 http://code.google.com/p/aceracpi
-Version 0.2
-18th August 2008
+Version 0.3
+4th April 2009
 
-Copyright 2007-2008 Carlos Corbacho <carlos@strangeworlds.co.uk>
+Copyright 2007-2009 Carlos Corbacho <carlos@strangeworlds.co.uk>
 
 acer-wmi is a driver to allow you to control various parts of your Acer laptop
 hardware under Linux which are exposed via ACPI-WMI.
@@ -36,6 +36,10 @@
 Supported Hardware
 ******************
 
+NOTE: The Acer Aspire One is not supported hardware. It cannot work with
+acer-wmi until Acer fix their ACPI-WMI implementation on them, so has been
+blacklisted until that happens.
+
 Please see the website for the current list of known working hardare:
 
 http://code.google.com/p/aceracpi/wiki/SupportedHardware
diff --git a/Documentation/laptops/thinkpad-acpi.txt b/Documentation/laptops/thinkpad-acpi.txt
index 41bc99f..3d76507 100644
--- a/Documentation/laptops/thinkpad-acpi.txt
+++ b/Documentation/laptops/thinkpad-acpi.txt
@@ -20,7 +20,8 @@
 kernel 2.6.29 and release 0.22.
 
 The driver is named "thinkpad-acpi".  In some places, like module
-names, "thinkpad_acpi" is used because of userspace issues.
+names and log messages, "thinkpad_acpi" is used because of userspace
+issues.
 
 "tpacpi" is used as a shorthand where "thinkpad-acpi" would be too
 long due to length limitations on some Linux kernel versions.
@@ -37,7 +38,7 @@
 	- ThinkLight on and off
 	- limited docking and undocking
 	- UltraBay eject
-	- CMOS control
+	- CMOS/UCMS control
 	- LED control
 	- ACPI sounds
 	- temperature sensors
@@ -46,6 +47,7 @@
 	- Volume control
 	- Fan control and monitoring: fan speed, fan enable/disable
 	- WAN enable and disable
+	- UWB enable and disable
 
 A compatibility table by model and feature is maintained on the web
 site, http://ibm-acpi.sf.net/. I appreciate any success or failure
@@ -53,7 +55,7 @@
 Please include the following information in your report:
 
 	- ThinkPad model name
-	- a copy of your DSDT, from /proc/acpi/dsdt
+	- a copy of your ACPI tables, using the "acpidump" utility
 	- a copy of the output of dmidecode, with serial numbers
 	  and UUIDs masked off
 	- which driver features work and which don't
@@ -66,17 +68,18 @@
 ------------
 
 If you are compiling this driver as included in the Linux kernel
-sources, simply enable the CONFIG_THINKPAD_ACPI option, and optionally
-enable the CONFIG_THINKPAD_ACPI_BAY option if you want the
-thinkpad-specific bay functionality.
+sources, look for the CONFIG_THINKPAD_ACPI Kconfig option.
+It is located on the menu path: "Device Drivers" -> "X86 Platform
+Specific Device Drivers" -> "ThinkPad ACPI Laptop Extras".
+
 
 Features
 --------
 
 The driver exports two different interfaces to userspace, which can be
 used to access the features it provides.  One is a legacy procfs-based
-interface, which will be removed at some time in the distant future.
-The other is a new sysfs-based interface which is not complete yet.
+interface, which will be removed at some time in the future.  The other
+is a new sysfs-based interface which is not complete yet.
 
 The procfs interface creates the /proc/acpi/ibm directory.  There is a
 file under that directory for each feature it supports.  The procfs
@@ -111,15 +114,17 @@
 as a driver attribute (see below).
 
 Sysfs driver attributes are on the driver's sysfs attribute space,
-for 2.6.23 this is /sys/bus/platform/drivers/thinkpad_acpi/ and
+for 2.6.23+ this is /sys/bus/platform/drivers/thinkpad_acpi/ and
 /sys/bus/platform/drivers/thinkpad_hwmon/
 
 Sysfs device attributes are on the thinkpad_acpi device sysfs attribute
-space, for 2.6.23 this is /sys/devices/platform/thinkpad_acpi/.
+space, for 2.6.23+ this is /sys/devices/platform/thinkpad_acpi/.
 
 Sysfs device attributes for the sensors and fan are on the
 thinkpad_hwmon device's sysfs attribute space, but you should locate it
-looking for a hwmon device with the name attribute of "thinkpad".
+looking for a hwmon device with the name attribute of "thinkpad", or
+better yet, through libsensors.
+
 
 Driver version
 --------------
@@ -129,6 +134,7 @@
 
 The driver name and version. No commands can be written to this file.
 
+
 Sysfs interface version
 -----------------------
 
@@ -160,6 +166,7 @@
 (an attribute not being there *is* a valid way to make it clear that a
 feature is not available in sysfs).
 
+
 Hot keys
 --------
 
@@ -172,17 +179,14 @@
 firmware that such a driver is present, and modifies how the ThinkPad
 firmware will behave in many situations.
 
-The driver enables the hot key feature automatically when loaded.  The
-feature can later be disabled and enabled back at runtime.  The driver
-will also restore the hot key feature to its previous state and mask
-when it is unloaded.
+The driver enables the HKEY ("hot key") event reporting automatically
+when loaded, and disables it when it is removed.
 
-When the hotkey feature is enabled and the hot key mask is set (see
-below), the driver will report HKEY events in the following format:
+The driver will report HKEY events in the following format:
 
 	ibm/hotkey HKEY 00000080 0000xxxx
 
-Some of these events refer to hot key presses, but not all.
+Some of these events refer to hot key presses, but not all of them.
 
 The driver will generate events over the input layer for hot keys and
 radio switches, and over the ACPI netlink layer for other events.  The
@@ -214,13 +218,17 @@
 
 The following commands can be written to the /proc/acpi/ibm/hotkey file:
 
-	echo enable > /proc/acpi/ibm/hotkey -- enable the hot keys feature
-	echo disable > /proc/acpi/ibm/hotkey -- disable the hot keys feature
 	echo 0xffffffff > /proc/acpi/ibm/hotkey -- enable all hot keys
 	echo 0 > /proc/acpi/ibm/hotkey -- disable all possible hot keys
 	... any other 8-hex-digit mask ...
 	echo reset > /proc/acpi/ibm/hotkey -- restore the original mask
 
+The following commands have been deprecated and will cause the kernel
+to log a warning:
+
+	echo enable > /proc/acpi/ibm/hotkey -- does nothing
+	echo disable > /proc/acpi/ibm/hotkey -- returns an error
+
 The procfs interface does not support NVRAM polling control.  So as to
 maintain maximum bug-to-bug compatibility, it does not report any masks,
 nor does it allow one to manipulate the hot key mask when the firmware
@@ -229,12 +237,9 @@
 sysfs notes:
 
 	hotkey_bios_enabled:
-		Returns the status of the hot keys feature when
-		thinkpad-acpi was loaded.  Upon module unload, the hot
-		key feature status will be restored to this value.
+		DEPRECATED, WILL BE REMOVED SOON.
 
-		0: hot keys were disabled
-		1: hot keys were enabled (unusual)
+		Returns 0.
 
 	hotkey_bios_mask:
 		Returns the hot keys mask when thinkpad-acpi was loaded.
@@ -242,13 +247,10 @@
 		to this value.
 
 	hotkey_enable:
-		Enables/disables the hot keys feature in the ACPI
-		firmware, and reports current status of the hot keys
-		feature.  Has no effect on the NVRAM hot key polling
-		functionality.
+		DEPRECATED, WILL BE REMOVED SOON.
 
-		0: disables the hot keys feature / feature disabled
-		1: enables the hot keys feature / feature enabled
+		0: returns -EPERM
+		1: does nothing
 
 	hotkey_mask:
 		bit mask to enable driver-handling (and depending on
@@ -618,6 +620,7 @@
    and map them to KEY_BRIGHTNESS_UP and KEY_BRIGHTNESS_DOWN.  Process
    these keys on userspace somehow (e.g. by calling xbacklight).
 
+
 Bluetooth
 ---------
 
@@ -628,6 +631,9 @@
 This feature shows the presence and current state of a ThinkPad
 Bluetooth device in the internal ThinkPad CDC slot.
 
+If the ThinkPad supports it, the Bluetooth state is stored in NVRAM,
+so it is kept across reboots and power-off.
+
 Procfs notes:
 
 If Bluetooth is installed, the following commands can be used:
@@ -652,6 +658,7 @@
 	rfkill controller switch "tpacpi_bluetooth_sw": refer to
 	Documentation/rfkill.txt for details.
 
+
 Video output control -- /proc/acpi/ibm/video
 --------------------------------------------
 
@@ -693,11 +700,8 @@
 features of this driver, as it uses the same ACPI methods as
 Fn-F7. Video switching on the console should still work.
 
-UPDATE: There's now a patch for the X.org Radeon driver which
-addresses this issue. Some people are reporting success with the patch
-while others are still having problems. For more information:
+UPDATE: refer to https://bugs.freedesktop.org/show_bug.cgi?id=2000
 
-https://bugs.freedesktop.org/show_bug.cgi?id=2000
 
 ThinkLight control
 ------------------
@@ -720,10 +724,11 @@
 documentation, in Documentation/leds-class.txt.  The ThinkLight LED name
 is "tpacpi::thinklight".
 
-Due to limitations in the sysfs LED class, if the status of the thinklight
+Due to limitations in the sysfs LED class, if the status of the ThinkLight
 cannot be read or if it is unknown, thinkpad-acpi will report it as "off".
 It is impossible to know if the status returned through sysfs is valid.
 
+
 Docking / undocking -- /proc/acpi/ibm/dock
 ------------------------------------------
 
@@ -784,6 +789,7 @@
 UltraBase docks and "dumb" port replicators like the Mini Dock (the
 latter don't need any ACPI support, actually).
 
+
 UltraBay eject -- /proc/acpi/ibm/bay
 ------------------------------------
 
@@ -847,8 +853,9 @@
 Note: the UltraBay eject support on the 600e/x, A22p and A3x is
 EXPERIMENTAL and may not work as expected. USE WITH CAUTION!
 
-CMOS control
-------------
+
+CMOS/UCMS control
+-----------------
 
 procfs: /proc/acpi/ibm/cmos
 sysfs device attribute: cmos_command
@@ -882,6 +889,7 @@
 in newer ThinkPads it is just a compatibility layer.  Do not use it, it is
 exported just as a debug tool.
 
+
 LED control
 -----------
 
@@ -893,6 +901,17 @@
 LED indicators as well.  Newer ThinkPads cannot query the real status
 of the LED indicators.
 
+Because misuse of the LEDs could induce an unaware user to perform
+dangerous actions (like undocking or ejecting a bay device while the
+buses are still active), or mask an important alarm (such as a nearly
+empty battery, or a broken battery), access to most LEDs is
+restricted.
+
+Unrestricted access to all LEDs requires that thinkpad-acpi be
+compiled with the CONFIG_THINKPAD_ACPI_UNSAFE_LEDS option enabled.
+Distributions must never enable this option.  Individual users that
+are aware of the consequences are welcome to enabling it.
+
 procfs notes:
 
 The available commands are:
@@ -939,6 +958,7 @@
 "timer" trigger, and leave the delay_on and delay_off parameters set to
 zero (to request hardware acceleration autodetection).
 
+
 ACPI sounds -- /proc/acpi/ibm/beep
 ----------------------------------
 
@@ -968,6 +988,7 @@
 	16 - one medium-pitched beep repeating constantly, stop with 17
 	17 - stop 16
 
+
 Temperature sensors
 -------------------
 
@@ -1115,6 +1136,7 @@
 with this, do send me your results (including some complete dumps with
 a description of the conditions when they were taken.)
 
+
 LCD brightness control
 ----------------------
 
@@ -1124,10 +1146,9 @@
 This feature allows software control of the LCD brightness on ThinkPad
 models which don't have a hardware brightness slider.
 
-It has some limitations: the LCD backlight cannot be actually turned on or
-off by this interface, and in many ThinkPad models, the "dim while on
-battery" functionality will be enabled by the BIOS when this interface is
-used, and cannot be controlled.
+It has some limitations: the LCD backlight cannot be actually turned
+on or off by this interface, it just controls the backlight brightness
+level.
 
 On IBM (and some of the earlier Lenovo) ThinkPads, the backlight control
 has eight brightness levels, ranging from 0 to 7.  Some of the levels
@@ -1136,10 +1157,15 @@
 from 0 to 15.
 
 There are two interfaces to the firmware for direct brightness control,
-EC and CMOS.  To select which one should be used, use the
+EC and UCMS (or CMOS).  To select which one should be used, use the
 brightness_mode module parameter: brightness_mode=1 selects EC mode,
-brightness_mode=2 selects CMOS mode, brightness_mode=3 selects both EC
-and CMOS.  The driver tries to auto-detect which interface to use.
+brightness_mode=2 selects UCMS mode, brightness_mode=3 selects EC
+mode with NVRAM backing (so that brightness changes are remembered
+across shutdown/reboot).
+
+The driver tries to select which interface to use from a table of
+defaults for each ThinkPad model.  If it makes a wrong choice, please
+report this as a bug, so that we can fix it.
 
 When display backlight brightness controls are available through the
 standard ACPI interface, it is best to use it instead of this direct
@@ -1201,6 +1227,7 @@
     and maybe reduce the life of the backlight lamps by needlessly kicking
     its level up and down at every change.
 
+
 Volume control -- /proc/acpi/ibm/volume
 ---------------------------------------
 
@@ -1217,6 +1244,11 @@
 up or down command (the level command will not unmute the volume).
 The current volume level and mute state is shown in the file.
 
+The ALSA mixer interface to this feature is still missing, but patches
+to add it exist.  That problem should be addressed in the not so
+distant future.
+
+
 Fan control and monitoring: fan speed, fan enable/disable
 ---------------------------------------------------------
 
@@ -1383,8 +1415,11 @@
 sysfs device attribute: wwan_enable (deprecated)
 sysfs rfkill class: switch "tpacpi_wwan_sw"
 
-This feature shows the presence and current state of a W-WAN (Sierra
-Wireless EV-DO) device.
+This feature shows the presence and current state of the built-in
+Wireless WAN device.
+
+If the ThinkPad supports it, the WWAN state is stored in NVRAM,
+so it is kept across reboots and power-off.
 
 It was tested on a Lenovo ThinkPad X60. It should probably work on other
 ThinkPad models which come with this module installed.
@@ -1413,6 +1448,7 @@
 	rfkill controller switch "tpacpi_wwan_sw": refer to
 	Documentation/rfkill.txt for details.
 
+
 EXPERIMENTAL: UWB
 -----------------
 
@@ -1431,6 +1467,7 @@
 	rfkill controller switch "tpacpi_uwb_sw": refer to
 	Documentation/rfkill.txt for details.
 
+
 Multiple Commands, Module Parameters
 ------------------------------------
 
@@ -1445,6 +1482,7 @@
 
 	modprobe thinkpad_acpi hotkey=enable,0xffff video=auto_disable
 
+
 Enabling debugging output
 -------------------------
 
@@ -1457,8 +1495,15 @@
 to enable more than one output class, just add their values.
 
 	Debug bitmask		Description
+	0x8000			Disclose PID of userspace programs
+				accessing some functions of the driver
 	0x0001			Initialization and probing
 	0x0002			Removal
+	0x0004			RF Transmitter control (RFKILL)
+				(bluetooth, WWAN, UWB...)
+	0x0008			HKEY event interface, hotkeys
+	0x0010			Fan control
+	0x0020			Backlight brightness
 
 There is also a kernel build option to enable more debugging
 information, which may be necessary to debug driver problems.
@@ -1467,6 +1512,7 @@
 at runtime through sysfs, using the driver attribute debug_level.  The
 attribute takes the same bitmask as the debug module parameter above.
 
+
 Force loading of module
 -----------------------
 
@@ -1505,3 +1551,7 @@
 
 0x020200:	Add poll()/select() support to the following attributes:
 		hotkey_radio_sw, wakeup_hotunplug_complete, wakeup_reason
+
+0x020300:	hotkey enable/disable support removed, attributes
+		hotkey_bios_enabled and hotkey_enable deprecated and
+		marked for removal.
diff --git a/Documentation/md.txt b/Documentation/md.txt
index 1da9d1b..4edd39e 100644
--- a/Documentation/md.txt
+++ b/Documentation/md.txt
@@ -164,15 +164,19 @@
   raid_disks
      a text file with a simple number indicating the number of devices
      in a fully functional array.  If this is not yet known, the file
-     will be empty.  If an array is being resized (not currently
-     possible) this will contain the larger of the old and new sizes.
-     Some raid level (RAID1) allow this value to be set while the
-     array is active.  This will reconfigure the array.   Otherwise
-     it can only be set while assembling an array.
+     will be empty.  If an array is being resized this will contain
+     the new number of devices.
+     Some raid levels allow this value to be set while the array is
+     active.  This will reconfigure the array.   Otherwise it can only
+     be set while assembling an array.
+     A change to this attribute will not be permitted if it would
+     reduce the size of the array.  To reduce the number of drives
+     in an e.g. raid5, the array size must first be reduced by
+     setting the 'array_size' attribute.
 
   chunk_size
-     This is the size if bytes for 'chunks' and is only relevant to
-     raid levels that involve striping (1,4,5,6,10). The address space
+     This is the size in bytes for 'chunks' and is only relevant to
+     raid levels that involve striping (0,4,5,6,10). The address space
      of the array is conceptually divided into chunks and consecutive
      chunks are striped onto neighbouring devices.
      The size should be at least PAGE_SIZE (4k) and should be a power
@@ -183,6 +187,20 @@
      simply a number that is interpretted differently by different
      levels.  It can be written while assembling an array.
 
+  array_size
+     This can be used to artificially constrain the available space in
+     the array to be less than is actually available on the combined
+     devices.  Writing a number (in Kilobytes) which is less than
+     the available size will set the size.  Any reconfiguration of the
+     array (e.g. adding devices) will not cause the size to change.
+     Writing the word 'default' will cause the effective size of the
+     array to be whatever size is actually available based on
+     'level', 'chunk_size' and 'component_size'.
+
+     This can be used to reduce the size of the array before reducing
+     the number of devices in a raid4/5/6, or to support external
+     metadata formats which mandate such clipping.
+
   reshape_position
      This is either "none" or a sector number within the devices of
      the array where "reshape" is up to.  If this is set, the three
@@ -207,6 +225,11 @@
      about the array.  It can be 0.90 (traditional format), 1.0, 1.1,
      1.2 (newer format in varying locations) or "none" indicating that
      the kernel isn't managing metadata at all.
+     Alternately it can be "external:" followed by a string which
+     is set by user-space.  This indicates that metadata is managed
+     by a user-space program.  Any device failure or other event that
+     requires a metadata update will cause array activity to be
+     suspended until the event is acknowledged.
 
   resync_start
      The point at which resync should start.  If no resync is needed,
diff --git a/Documentation/powerpc/dts-bindings/fsl/cpm_qe/qe/firmware.txt b/Documentation/powerpc/dts-bindings/fsl/cpm_qe/qe/firmware.txt
index 6c238f5..249db3a 100644
--- a/Documentation/powerpc/dts-bindings/fsl/cpm_qe/qe/firmware.txt
+++ b/Documentation/powerpc/dts-bindings/fsl/cpm_qe/qe/firmware.txt
@@ -1,6 +1,6 @@
 * Uploaded QE firmware
 
-      If a new firwmare has been uploaded to the QE (usually by the
+      If a new firmware has been uploaded to the QE (usually by the
       boot loader), then a 'firmware' child node should be added to the QE
       node.  This node provides information on the uploaded firmware that
       device drivers may need.
diff --git a/Documentation/powerpc/dts-bindings/fsl/upm-nand.txt b/Documentation/powerpc/dts-bindings/fsl/upm-nand.txt
index 84a04d5..a48b2ca 100644
--- a/Documentation/powerpc/dts-bindings/fsl/upm-nand.txt
+++ b/Documentation/powerpc/dts-bindings/fsl/upm-nand.txt
@@ -5,9 +5,21 @@
 - reg : should specify localbus chip select and size used for the chip.
 - fsl,upm-addr-offset : UPM pattern offset for the address latch.
 - fsl,upm-cmd-offset : UPM pattern offset for the command latch.
-- gpios : may specify optional GPIO connected to the Ready-Not-Busy pin.
 
-Example:
+Optional properties:
+- fsl,upm-wait-flags : add chip-dependent short delays after running the
+	UPM pattern (0x1), after writing a data byte (0x2) or after
+	writing out a buffer (0x4).
+- fsl,upm-addr-line-cs-offsets : address offsets for multi-chip support.
+	The corresponding address lines are used to select the chip.
+- gpios : may specify optional GPIOs connected to the Ready-Not-Busy pins
+	(R/B#). For multi-chip devices, "n" GPIO definitions are required
+	according to the number of chips.
+- chip-delay : chip dependent delay for transfering data from array to
+	read registers (tR). Required if property "gpios" is not used
+	(R/B# pins not connected).
+
+Examples:
 
 upm@1,0 {
 	compatible = "fsl,upm-nand";
@@ -26,3 +38,26 @@
 		};
 	};
 };
+
+upm@3,0 {
+	#address-cells = <0>;
+	#size-cells = <0>;
+	compatible = "tqc,tqm8548-upm-nand", "fsl,upm-nand";
+	reg = <3 0x0 0x800>;
+	fsl,upm-addr-offset = <0x10>;
+	fsl,upm-cmd-offset = <0x08>;
+	/* Multi-chip NAND device */
+	fsl,upm-addr-line-cs-offsets = <0x0 0x200>;
+	fsl,upm-wait-flags = <0x5>;
+	chip-delay = <25>; // in micro-seconds
+
+	nand@0 {
+		#address-cells = <1>;
+		#size-cells = <1>;
+
+		partition@0 {
+			    label = "fs";
+			    reg = <0x00000000 0x10000000>;
+		};
+	};
+};
diff --git a/Documentation/powerpc/dts-bindings/gpio/led.txt b/Documentation/powerpc/dts-bindings/gpio/led.txt
index ff51f4c0..4fe14de 100644
--- a/Documentation/powerpc/dts-bindings/gpio/led.txt
+++ b/Documentation/powerpc/dts-bindings/gpio/led.txt
@@ -1,15 +1,43 @@
-LED connected to GPIO
+LEDs connected to GPIO lines
 
 Required properties:
-- compatible : should be "gpio-led".
-- label : (optional) the label for this LED. If omitted, the label is
+- compatible : should be "gpio-leds".
+
+Each LED is represented as a sub-node of the gpio-leds device.  Each
+node's name represents the name of the corresponding LED.
+
+LED sub-node properties:
+- gpios :  Should specify the LED's GPIO, see "Specifying GPIO information
+  for devices" in Documentation/powerpc/booting-without-of.txt.  Active
+  low LEDs should be indicated using flags in the GPIO specifier.
+- label :  (optional) The label for this LED.  If omitted, the label is
   taken from the node name (excluding the unit address).
-- gpios : should specify LED GPIO.
+- linux,default-trigger :  (optional) This parameter, if present, is a
+  string defining the trigger assigned to the LED.  Current triggers are:
+    "backlight" - LED will act as a back-light, controlled by the framebuffer
+		  system
+    "default-on" - LED will turn on
+    "heartbeat" - LED "double" flashes at a load average based rate
+    "ide-disk" - LED indicates disk activity
+    "timer" - LED flashes at a fixed, configurable rate
 
-Example:
+Examples:
 
-led@0 {
-	compatible = "gpio-led";
-	label = "hdd";
-	gpios = <&mcu_pio 0 1>;
+leds {
+	compatible = "gpio-leds";
+	hdd {
+		label = "IDE Activity";
+		gpios = <&mcu_pio 0 1>; /* Active low */
+		linux,default-trigger = "ide-disk";
+	};
 };
+
+run-control {
+	compatible = "gpio-leds";
+	red {
+		gpios = <&mpc8572 6 0>;
+	};
+	green {
+		gpios = <&mpc8572 7 0>;
+	};
+}
diff --git a/Documentation/scheduler/sched-rt-group.txt b/Documentation/scheduler/sched-rt-group.txt
index 3ef339f..5ba4d3f 100644
--- a/Documentation/scheduler/sched-rt-group.txt
+++ b/Documentation/scheduler/sched-rt-group.txt
@@ -126,7 +126,7 @@
 to control the CPU time reserved for each control group instead.
 
 For more information on working with control groups, you should read
-Documentation/cgroups.txt as well.
+Documentation/cgroups/cgroups.txt as well.
 
 Group settings are checked against the following limits in order to keep the configuration
 schedulable:
diff --git a/Documentation/scsi/aacraid.txt b/Documentation/scsi/aacraid.txt
index ddace3a..30f643f 100644
--- a/Documentation/scsi/aacraid.txt
+++ b/Documentation/scsi/aacraid.txt
@@ -60,17 +60,9 @@
 	9005:0285:9005:02d5	Adaptec	ASR-2405 (Voodoo40 Lite)
 	9005:0285:9005:02d6	Adaptec	ASR-2445 (Voodoo44 Lite)
 	9005:0285:9005:02d7	Adaptec	ASR-2805 (Voodoo80 Lite)
-	9005:0285:9005:02d8	Adaptec	5405G (Voodoo40 PM)
-	9005:0285:9005:02d9	Adaptec	5445G (Voodoo44 PM)
-	9005:0285:9005:02da	Adaptec	5805G (Voodoo80 PM)
-	9005:0285:9005:02db	Adaptec	5085G (Voodoo08 PM)
-	9005:0285:9005:02dc	Adaptec	51245G (Voodoo124 PM)
-	9005:0285:9005:02dd	Adaptec	51645G (Voodoo164 PM)
-	9005:0285:9005:02de	Adaptec	52445G (Voodoo244 PM)
-	9005:0285:9005:02df	Adaptec	ASR-2045G (Voodoo04 Lite PM)
-	9005:0285:9005:02e0	Adaptec	ASR-2405G (Voodoo40 Lite PM)
-	9005:0285:9005:02e1	Adaptec	ASR-2445G (Voodoo44 Lite PM)
-	9005:0285:9005:02e2	Adaptec	ASR-2805G (Voodoo80 Lite PM)
+	9005:0285:9005:02d8	Adaptec	5405Z (Voodoo40 BLBU)
+	9005:0285:9005:02d9	Adaptec	5445Z (Voodoo44 BLBU)
+	9005:0285:9005:02da	Adaptec	5805Z (Voodoo80 BLBU)
 	1011:0046:9005:0364	Adaptec	5400S (Mustang)
 	1011:0046:9005:0365	Adaptec	5400S (Mustang)
 	9005:0287:9005:0800	Adaptec	Themisto (Jupiter)
@@ -140,6 +132,7 @@
 					 where fibs that go to the hardware are consistently called hw_fibs and
 					 not just fibs like the name of the driver tracking structure)
 Mark Salyzyn <Mark_Salyzyn@adaptec.com> Fixed panic issues and added some new product ids for upcoming hbas. Performance tuning, card failover and bug mitigations.
+Achim Leubner <Achim_Leubner@adaptec.com>
 
 Original Driver
 -------------------------
diff --git a/Documentation/slow-work.txt b/Documentation/slow-work.txt
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..ebc50f8
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/slow-work.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,174 @@
+		     ====================================
+		     SLOW WORK ITEM EXECUTION THREAD POOL
+		     ====================================
+
+By: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com>
+
+The slow work item execution thread pool is a pool of threads for performing
+things that take a relatively long time, such as making mkdir calls.
+Typically, when processing something, these items will spend a lot of time
+blocking a thread on I/O, thus making that thread unavailable for doing other
+work.
+
+The standard workqueue model is unsuitable for this class of work item as that
+limits the owner to a single thread or a single thread per CPU.  For some
+tasks, however, more threads - or fewer - are required.
+
+There is just one pool per system.  It contains no threads unless something
+wants to use it - and that something must register its interest first.  When
+the pool is active, the number of threads it contains is dynamic, varying
+between a maximum and minimum setting, depending on the load.
+
+
+====================
+CLASSES OF WORK ITEM
+====================
+
+This pool support two classes of work items:
+
+ (*) Slow work items.
+
+ (*) Very slow work items.
+
+The former are expected to finish much quicker than the latter.
+
+An operation of the very slow class may do a batch combination of several
+lookups, mkdirs, and a create for instance.
+
+An operation of the ordinarily slow class may, for example, write stuff or
+expand files, provided the time taken to do so isn't too long.
+
+Operations of both types may sleep during execution, thus tying up the thread
+loaned to it.
+
+
+THREAD-TO-CLASS ALLOCATION
+--------------------------
+
+Not all the threads in the pool are available to work on very slow work items.
+The number will be between one and one fewer than the number of active threads.
+This is configurable (see the "Pool Configuration" section).
+
+All the threads are available to work on ordinarily slow work items, but a
+percentage of the threads will prefer to work on very slow work items.
+
+The configuration ensures that at least one thread will be available to work on
+very slow work items, and at least one thread will be available that won't work
+on very slow work items at all.
+
+
+=====================
+USING SLOW WORK ITEMS
+=====================
+
+Firstly, a module or subsystem wanting to make use of slow work items must
+register its interest:
+
+	 int ret = slow_work_register_user();
+
+This will return 0 if successful, or a -ve error upon failure.
+
+
+Slow work items may then be set up by:
+
+ (1) Declaring a slow_work struct type variable:
+
+	#include <linux/slow-work.h>
+
+	struct slow_work myitem;
+
+ (2) Declaring the operations to be used for this item:
+
+	struct slow_work_ops myitem_ops = {
+		.get_ref = myitem_get_ref,
+		.put_ref = myitem_put_ref,
+		.execute = myitem_execute,
+	};
+
+     [*] For a description of the ops, see section "Item Operations".
+
+ (3) Initialising the item:
+
+	slow_work_init(&myitem, &myitem_ops);
+
+     or:
+
+	vslow_work_init(&myitem, &myitem_ops);
+
+     depending on its class.
+
+A suitably set up work item can then be enqueued for processing:
+
+	int ret = slow_work_enqueue(&myitem);
+
+This will return a -ve error if the thread pool is unable to gain a reference
+on the item, 0 otherwise.
+
+
+The items are reference counted, so there ought to be no need for a flush
+operation.  When all a module's slow work items have been processed, and the
+module has no further interest in the facility, it should unregister its
+interest:
+
+	slow_work_unregister_user();
+
+
+===============
+ITEM OPERATIONS
+===============
+
+Each work item requires a table of operations of type struct slow_work_ops.
+All members are required:
+
+ (*) Get a reference on an item:
+
+	int (*get_ref)(struct slow_work *work);
+
+     This allows the thread pool to attempt to pin an item by getting a
+     reference on it.  This function should return 0 if the reference was
+     granted, or a -ve error otherwise.  If an error is returned,
+     slow_work_enqueue() will fail.
+
+     The reference is held whilst the item is queued and whilst it is being
+     executed.  The item may then be requeued with the same reference held, or
+     the reference will be released.
+
+ (*) Release a reference on an item:
+
+	void (*put_ref)(struct slow_work *work);
+
+     This allows the thread pool to unpin an item by releasing the reference on
+     it.  The thread pool will not touch the item again once this has been
+     called.
+
+ (*) Execute an item:
+
+	void (*execute)(struct slow_work *work);
+
+     This should perform the work required of the item.  It may sleep, it may
+     perform disk I/O and it may wait for locks.
+
+
+==================
+POOL CONFIGURATION
+==================
+
+The slow-work thread pool has a number of configurables:
+
+ (*) /proc/sys/kernel/slow-work/min-threads
+
+     The minimum number of threads that should be in the pool whilst it is in
+     use.  This may be anywhere between 2 and max-threads.
+
+ (*) /proc/sys/kernel/slow-work/max-threads
+
+     The maximum number of threads that should in the pool.  This may be
+     anywhere between min-threads and 255 or NR_CPUS * 2, whichever is greater.
+
+ (*) /proc/sys/kernel/slow-work/vslow-percentage
+
+     The percentage of active threads in the pool that may be used to execute
+     very slow work items.  This may be between 1 and 99.  The resultant number
+     is bounded to between 1 and one fewer than the number of active threads.
+     This ensures there is always at least one thread that can process very
+     slow work items, and always at least one thread that won't.
diff --git a/Documentation/sound/alsa/soc/jack.txt b/Documentation/sound/alsa/soc/jack.txt
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..fcf82a4
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/sound/alsa/soc/jack.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,71 @@
+ASoC jack detection
+===================
+
+ALSA has a standard API for representing physical jacks to user space,
+the kernel side of which can be seen in include/sound/jack.h.  ASoC
+provides a version of this API adding two additional features:
+
+ - It allows more than one jack detection method to work together on one
+   user visible jack.  In embedded systems it is common for multiple
+   to be present on a single jack but handled by separate bits of
+   hardware.
+
+ - Integration with DAPM, allowing DAPM endpoints to be updated
+   automatically based on the detected jack status (eg, turning off the
+   headphone outputs if no headphones are present).
+
+This is done by splitting the jacks up into three things working
+together: the jack itself represented by a struct snd_soc_jack, sets of
+snd_soc_jack_pins representing DAPM endpoints to update and blocks of
+code providing jack reporting mechanisms.
+
+For example, a system may have a stereo headset jack with two reporting
+mechanisms, one for the headphone and one for the microphone.  Some
+systems won't be able to use their speaker output while a headphone is
+connected and so will want to make sure to update both speaker and
+headphone when the headphone jack status changes.
+
+The jack - struct snd_soc_jack
+==============================
+
+This represents a physical jack on the system and is what is visible to
+user space.  The jack itself is completely passive, it is set up by the
+machine driver and updated by jack detection methods.
+
+Jacks are created by the machine driver calling snd_soc_jack_new().
+
+snd_soc_jack_pin
+================
+
+These represent a DAPM pin to update depending on some of the status
+bits supported by the jack.  Each snd_soc_jack has zero or more of these
+which are updated automatically.  They are created by the machine driver
+and associated with the jack using snd_soc_jack_add_pins().  The status
+of the endpoint may configured to be the opposite of the jack status if
+required (eg, enabling a built in microphone if a microphone is not
+connected via a jack).
+
+Jack detection methods
+======================
+
+Actual jack detection is done by code which is able to monitor some
+input to the system and update a jack by calling snd_soc_jack_report(),
+specifying a subset of bits to update.  The jack detection code should
+be set up by the machine driver, taking configuration for the jack to
+update and the set of things to report when the jack is connected.
+
+Often this is done based on the status of a GPIO - a handler for this is
+provided by the snd_soc_jack_add_gpio() function.  Other methods are
+also available, for example integrated into CODECs.  One example of
+CODEC integrated jack detection can be see in the WM8350 driver.
+
+Each jack may have multiple reporting mechanisms, though it will need at
+least one to be useful.
+
+Machine drivers
+===============
+
+These are all hooked together by the machine driver depending on the
+system hardware.  The machine driver will set up the snd_soc_jack and
+the list of pins to update then set up one or more jack detection
+mechanisms to update that jack based on their current status.
diff --git a/Documentation/sparse.txt b/Documentation/sparse.txt
index 42f43fa..34c76a5 100644
--- a/Documentation/sparse.txt
+++ b/Documentation/sparse.txt
@@ -42,6 +42,14 @@
 vs cpu-endian vs whatever), and there the constant "0" really _is_
 special.
 
+__bitwise__ - to be used for relatively compact stuff (gfp_t, etc.) that
+is mostly warning-free and is supposed to stay that way.  Warnings will
+be generated without __CHECK_ENDIAN__.
+
+__bitwise - noisy stuff; in particular, __le*/__be* are that.  We really
+don't want to drown in noise unless we'd explicitly asked for it.
+
+
 Getting sparse
 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 
diff --git a/Documentation/sysctl/net.txt b/Documentation/sysctl/net.txt
index a34d55b..df38ef0 100644
--- a/Documentation/sysctl/net.txt
+++ b/Documentation/sysctl/net.txt
@@ -95,7 +95,7 @@
 
 There is only one file in this directory.
 unix_dgram_qlen limits the max number of datagrams queued in Unix domain
-socket's buffer. It will not take effect unless PF_UNIX flag is spicified.
+socket's buffer. It will not take effect unless PF_UNIX flag is specified.
 
 
 3. /proc/sys/net/ipv4 - IPV4 settings
diff --git a/Documentation/sysctl/vm.txt b/Documentation/sysctl/vm.txt
index 3197fc8..97c4b32 100644
--- a/Documentation/sysctl/vm.txt
+++ b/Documentation/sysctl/vm.txt
@@ -39,6 +39,8 @@
 - nr_hugepages
 - nr_overcommit_hugepages
 - nr_pdflush_threads
+- nr_pdflush_threads_min
+- nr_pdflush_threads_max
 - nr_trim_pages         (only if CONFIG_MMU=n)
 - numa_zonelist_order
 - oom_dump_tasks
@@ -463,6 +465,32 @@
 
 ==============================================================
 
+nr_pdflush_threads_min
+
+This value controls the minimum number of pdflush threads.
+
+At boot time, the kernel will create and maintain 'nr_pdflush_threads_min'
+threads for the kernel's lifetime.
+
+The default value is 2.  The minimum value you can specify is 1, and
+the maximum value is the current setting of 'nr_pdflush_threads_max'.
+
+See 'nr_pdflush_threads_max' below for more information.
+
+==============================================================
+
+nr_pdflush_threads_max
+
+This value controls the maximum number of pdflush threads that can be
+created.  The pdflush algorithm will create a new pdflush thread (up to
+this maximum) if no pdflush threads have been available for >= 1 second.
+
+The default value is 8.  The minimum value you can specify is the
+current value of 'nr_pdflush_threads_min' and the
+maximum is 1000.
+
+==============================================================
+
 overcommit_memory:
 
 This value contains a flag that enables memory overcommitment.
diff --git a/Documentation/sysrq.txt b/Documentation/sysrq.txt
index afa2946..cf42b82 100644
--- a/Documentation/sysrq.txt
+++ b/Documentation/sysrq.txt
@@ -115,6 +115,8 @@
 
 'x'	- Used by xmon interface on ppc/powerpc platforms.
 
+'z'	- Dump the ftrace buffer
+
 '0'-'9' - Sets the console log level, controlling which kernel messages
           will be printed to your console. ('0', for example would make
           it so that only emergency messages like PANICs or OOPSes would
diff --git a/Documentation/tomoyo.txt b/Documentation/tomoyo.txt
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..b3a232c
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/tomoyo.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,55 @@
+--- What is TOMOYO? ---
+
+TOMOYO is a name-based MAC extension (LSM module) for the Linux kernel.
+
+LiveCD-based tutorials are available at
+http://tomoyo.sourceforge.jp/en/1.6.x/1st-step/ubuntu8.04-live/
+http://tomoyo.sourceforge.jp/en/1.6.x/1st-step/centos5-live/ .
+Though these tutorials use non-LSM version of TOMOYO, they are useful for you
+to know what TOMOYO is.
+
+--- How to enable TOMOYO? ---
+
+Build the kernel with CONFIG_SECURITY_TOMOYO=y and pass "security=tomoyo" on
+kernel's command line.
+
+Please see http://tomoyo.sourceforge.jp/en/2.2.x/ for details.
+
+--- Where is documentation? ---
+
+User <-> Kernel interface documentation is available at
+http://tomoyo.sourceforge.jp/en/2.2.x/policy-reference.html .
+
+Materials we prepared for seminars and symposiums are available at
+http://sourceforge.jp/projects/tomoyo/docs/?category_id=532&language_id=1 .
+Below lists are chosen from three aspects.
+
+What is TOMOYO?
+  TOMOYO Linux Overview
+    http://sourceforge.jp/projects/tomoyo/docs/lca2009-takeda.pdf
+  TOMOYO Linux: pragmatic and manageable security for Linux
+    http://sourceforge.jp/projects/tomoyo/docs/freedomhectaipei-tomoyo.pdf
+  TOMOYO Linux: A Practical Method to Understand and Protect Your Own Linux Box
+    http://sourceforge.jp/projects/tomoyo/docs/PacSec2007-en-no-demo.pdf
+
+What can TOMOYO do?
+  Deep inside TOMOYO Linux
+    http://sourceforge.jp/projects/tomoyo/docs/lca2009-kumaneko.pdf
+  The role of "pathname based access control" in security.
+    http://sourceforge.jp/projects/tomoyo/docs/lfj2008-bof.pdf
+
+History of TOMOYO?
+  Realities of Mainlining
+    http://sourceforge.jp/projects/tomoyo/docs/lfj2008.pdf
+
+--- What is future plan? ---
+
+We believe that inode based security and name based security are complementary
+and both should be used together. But unfortunately, so far, we cannot enable
+multiple LSM modules at the same time. We feel sorry that you have to give up
+SELinux/SMACK/AppArmor etc. when you want to use TOMOYO.
+
+We hope that LSM becomes stackable in future. Meanwhile, you can use non-LSM
+version of TOMOYO, available at http://tomoyo.sourceforge.jp/en/1.6.x/ .
+LSM version of TOMOYO is a subset of non-LSM version of TOMOYO. We are planning
+to port non-LSM version's functionalities to LSM versions.
diff --git a/Documentation/trace/ftrace.txt b/Documentation/trace/ftrace.txt
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..fd9a3e6
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/trace/ftrace.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,1828 @@
+		ftrace - Function Tracer
+		========================
+
+Copyright 2008 Red Hat Inc.
+   Author:   Steven Rostedt <srostedt@redhat.com>
+  License:   The GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2
+               (dual licensed under the GPL v2)
+Reviewers:   Elias Oltmanns, Randy Dunlap, Andrew Morton,
+	     John Kacur, and David Teigland.
+
+Written for: 2.6.28-rc2
+
+Introduction
+------------
+
+Ftrace is an internal tracer designed to help out developers and
+designers of systems to find what is going on inside the kernel.
+It can be used for debugging or analyzing latencies and
+performance issues that take place outside of user-space.
+
+Although ftrace is the function tracer, it also includes an
+infrastructure that allows for other types of tracing. Some of
+the tracers that are currently in ftrace include a tracer to
+trace context switches, the time it takes for a high priority
+task to run after it was woken up, the time interrupts are
+disabled, and more (ftrace allows for tracer plugins, which
+means that the list of tracers can always grow).
+
+
+The File System
+---------------
+
+Ftrace uses the debugfs file system to hold the control files as
+well as the files to display output.
+
+To mount the debugfs system:
+
+  # mkdir /debug
+  # mount -t debugfs nodev /debug
+
+( Note: it is more common to mount at /sys/kernel/debug, but for
+  simplicity this document will use /debug)
+
+That's it! (assuming that you have ftrace configured into your kernel)
+
+After mounting the debugfs, you can see a directory called
+"tracing".  This directory contains the control and output files
+of ftrace. Here is a list of some of the key files:
+
+
+ Note: all time values are in microseconds.
+
+  current_tracer:
+
+	This is used to set or display the current tracer
+	that is configured.
+
+  available_tracers:
+
+	This holds the different types of tracers that
+	have been compiled into the kernel. The
+	tracers listed here can be configured by
+	echoing their name into current_tracer.
+
+  tracing_enabled:
+
+	This sets or displays whether the current_tracer
+	is activated and tracing or not. Echo 0 into this
+	file to disable the tracer or 1 to enable it.
+
+  trace:
+
+	This file holds the output of the trace in a human
+	readable format (described below).
+
+  latency_trace:
+
+	This file shows the same trace but the information
+	is organized more to display possible latencies
+	in the system (described below).
+
+  trace_pipe:
+
+	The output is the same as the "trace" file but this
+	file is meant to be streamed with live tracing.
+	Reads from this file will block until new data
+	is retrieved. Unlike the "trace" and "latency_trace"
+	files, this file is a consumer. This means reading
+	from this file causes sequential reads to display
+	more current data. Once data is read from this
+	file, it is consumed, and will not be read
+	again with a sequential read. The "trace" and
+	"latency_trace" files are static, and if the
+	tracer is not adding more data, they will display
+	the same information every time they are read.
+
+  trace_options:
+
+	This file lets the user control the amount of data
+	that is displayed in one of the above output
+	files.
+
+  tracing_max_latency:
+
+	Some of the tracers record the max latency.
+	For example, the time interrupts are disabled.
+	This time is saved in this file. The max trace
+	will also be stored, and displayed by either
+	"trace" or "latency_trace".  A new max trace will
+	only be recorded if the latency is greater than
+	the value in this file. (in microseconds)
+
+  buffer_size_kb:
+
+	This sets or displays the number of kilobytes each CPU
+	buffer can hold. The tracer buffers are the same size
+	for each CPU. The displayed number is the size of the
+	CPU buffer and not total size of all buffers. The
+	trace buffers are allocated in pages (blocks of memory
+	that the kernel uses for allocation, usually 4 KB in size).
+	If the last page allocated has room for more bytes
+	than requested, the rest of the page will be used,
+	making the actual allocation bigger than requested.
+	( Note, the size may not be a multiple of the page size
+	  due to buffer managment overhead. )
+
+	This can only be updated when the current_tracer
+	is set to "nop".
+
+  tracing_cpumask:
+
+	This is a mask that lets the user only trace
+	on specified CPUS. The format is a hex string
+	representing the CPUS.
+
+  set_ftrace_filter:
+
+	When dynamic ftrace is configured in (see the
+	section below "dynamic ftrace"), the code is dynamically
+	modified (code text rewrite) to disable calling of the
+	function profiler (mcount). This lets tracing be configured
+	in with practically no overhead in performance.  This also
+	has a side effect of enabling or disabling specific functions
+	to be traced. Echoing names of functions into this file
+	will limit the trace to only those functions.
+
+  set_ftrace_notrace:
+
+	This has an effect opposite to that of
+	set_ftrace_filter. Any function that is added here will not
+	be traced. If a function exists in both set_ftrace_filter
+	and set_ftrace_notrace,	the function will _not_ be traced.
+
+  set_ftrace_pid:
+
+	Have the function tracer only trace a single thread.
+
+  set_graph_function:
+
+	Set a "trigger" function where tracing should start
+	with the function graph tracer (See the section
+	"dynamic ftrace" for more details).
+
+  available_filter_functions:
+
+	This lists the functions that ftrace
+	has processed and can trace. These are the function
+	names that you can pass to "set_ftrace_filter" or
+	"set_ftrace_notrace". (See the section "dynamic ftrace"
+	below for more details.)
+
+
+The Tracers
+-----------
+
+Here is the list of current tracers that may be configured.
+
+  "function"
+
+	Function call tracer to trace all kernel functions.
+
+  "function_graph_tracer"
+
+	Similar to the function tracer except that the
+	function tracer probes the functions on their entry
+	whereas the function graph tracer traces on both entry
+	and exit of the functions. It then provides the ability
+	to draw a graph of function calls similar to C code
+	source.
+
+  "sched_switch"
+
+	Traces the context switches and wakeups between tasks.
+
+  "irqsoff"
+
+	Traces the areas that disable interrupts and saves
+	the trace with the longest max latency.
+	See tracing_max_latency. When a new max is recorded,
+	it replaces the old trace. It is best to view this
+	trace via the latency_trace file.
+
+  "preemptoff"
+
+	Similar to irqsoff but traces and records the amount of
+	time for which preemption is disabled.
+
+  "preemptirqsoff"
+
+	Similar to irqsoff and preemptoff, but traces and
+	records the largest time for which irqs and/or preemption
+	is disabled.
+
+  "wakeup"
+
+	Traces and records the max latency that it takes for
+	the highest priority task to get scheduled after
+	it has been woken up.
+
+  "hw-branch-tracer"
+
+	Uses the BTS CPU feature on x86 CPUs to traces all
+	branches executed.
+
+  "nop"
+
+	This is the "trace nothing" tracer. To remove all
+	tracers from tracing simply echo "nop" into
+	current_tracer.
+
+
+Examples of using the tracer
+----------------------------
+
+Here are typical examples of using the tracers when controlling
+them only with the debugfs interface (without using any
+user-land utilities).
+
+Output format:
+--------------
+
+Here is an example of the output format of the file "trace"
+
+                             --------
+# tracer: function
+#
+#           TASK-PID   CPU#    TIMESTAMP  FUNCTION
+#              | |      |          |         |
+            bash-4251  [01] 10152.583854: path_put <-path_walk
+            bash-4251  [01] 10152.583855: dput <-path_put
+            bash-4251  [01] 10152.583855: _atomic_dec_and_lock <-dput
+                             --------
+
+A header is printed with the tracer name that is represented by
+the trace. In this case the tracer is "function". Then a header
+showing the format. Task name "bash", the task PID "4251", the
+CPU that it was running on "01", the timestamp in <secs>.<usecs>
+format, the function name that was traced "path_put" and the
+parent function that called this function "path_walk". The
+timestamp is the time at which the function was entered.
+
+The sched_switch tracer also includes tracing of task wakeups
+and context switches.
+
+     ksoftirqd/1-7     [01]  1453.070013:      7:115:R   +  2916:115:S
+     ksoftirqd/1-7     [01]  1453.070013:      7:115:R   +    10:115:S
+     ksoftirqd/1-7     [01]  1453.070013:      7:115:R ==>    10:115:R
+        events/1-10    [01]  1453.070013:     10:115:S ==>  2916:115:R
+     kondemand/1-2916  [01]  1453.070013:   2916:115:S ==>     7:115:R
+     ksoftirqd/1-7     [01]  1453.070013:      7:115:S ==>     0:140:R
+
+Wake ups are represented by a "+" and the context switches are
+shown as "==>".  The format is:
+
+ Context switches:
+
+       Previous task              Next Task
+
+  <pid>:<prio>:<state>  ==>  <pid>:<prio>:<state>
+
+ Wake ups:
+
+       Current task               Task waking up
+
+  <pid>:<prio>:<state>    +  <pid>:<prio>:<state>
+
+The prio is the internal kernel priority, which is the inverse
+of the priority that is usually displayed by user-space tools.
+Zero represents the highest priority (99). Prio 100 starts the
+"nice" priorities with 100 being equal to nice -20 and 139 being
+nice 19. The prio "140" is reserved for the idle task which is
+the lowest priority thread (pid 0).
+
+
+Latency trace format
+--------------------
+
+For traces that display latency times, the latency_trace file
+gives somewhat more information to see why a latency happened.
+Here is a typical trace.
+
+# tracer: irqsoff
+#
+irqsoff latency trace v1.1.5 on 2.6.26-rc8
+--------------------------------------------------------------------
+ latency: 97 us, #3/3, CPU#0 | (M:preempt VP:0, KP:0, SP:0 HP:0 #P:2)
+    -----------------
+    | task: swapper-0 (uid:0 nice:0 policy:0 rt_prio:0)
+    -----------------
+ => started at: apic_timer_interrupt
+ => ended at:   do_softirq
+
+#                _------=> CPU#
+#               / _-----=> irqs-off
+#              | / _----=> need-resched
+#              || / _---=> hardirq/softirq
+#              ||| / _--=> preempt-depth
+#              |||| /
+#              |||||     delay
+#  cmd     pid ||||| time  |   caller
+#     \   /    |||||   \   |   /
+  <idle>-0     0d..1    0us+: trace_hardirqs_off_thunk (apic_timer_interrupt)
+  <idle>-0     0d.s.   97us : __do_softirq (do_softirq)
+  <idle>-0     0d.s1   98us : trace_hardirqs_on (do_softirq)
+
+
+This shows that the current tracer is "irqsoff" tracing the time
+for which interrupts were disabled. It gives the trace version
+and the version of the kernel upon which this was executed on
+(2.6.26-rc8). Then it displays the max latency in microsecs (97
+us). The number of trace entries displayed and the total number
+recorded (both are three: #3/3). The type of preemption that was
+used (PREEMPT). VP, KP, SP, and HP are always zero and are
+reserved for later use. #P is the number of online CPUS (#P:2).
+
+The task is the process that was running when the latency
+occurred. (swapper pid: 0).
+
+The start and stop (the functions in which the interrupts were
+disabled and enabled respectively) that caused the latencies:
+
+  apic_timer_interrupt is where the interrupts were disabled.
+  do_softirq is where they were enabled again.
+
+The next lines after the header are the trace itself. The header
+explains which is which.
+
+  cmd: The name of the process in the trace.
+
+  pid: The PID of that process.
+
+  CPU#: The CPU which the process was running on.
+
+  irqs-off: 'd' interrupts are disabled. '.' otherwise.
+	    Note: If the architecture does not support a way to
+		  read the irq flags variable, an 'X' will always
+		  be printed here.
+
+  need-resched: 'N' task need_resched is set, '.' otherwise.
+
+  hardirq/softirq:
+	'H' - hard irq occurred inside a softirq.
+	'h' - hard irq is running
+	's' - soft irq is running
+	'.' - normal context.
+
+  preempt-depth: The level of preempt_disabled
+
+The above is mostly meaningful for kernel developers.
+
+  time: This differs from the trace file output. The trace file output
+	includes an absolute timestamp. The timestamp used by the
+	latency_trace file is relative to the start of the trace.
+
+  delay: This is just to help catch your eye a bit better. And
+	 needs to be fixed to be only relative to the same CPU.
+	 The marks are determined by the difference between this
+	 current trace and the next trace.
+	  '!' - greater than preempt_mark_thresh (default 100)
+	  '+' - greater than 1 microsecond
+	  ' ' - less than or equal to 1 microsecond.
+
+  The rest is the same as the 'trace' file.
+
+
+trace_options
+-------------
+
+The trace_options file is used to control what gets printed in
+the trace output. To see what is available, simply cat the file:
+
+  cat /debug/tracing/trace_options
+  print-parent nosym-offset nosym-addr noverbose noraw nohex nobin \
+  noblock nostacktrace nosched-tree nouserstacktrace nosym-userobj
+
+To disable one of the options, echo in the option prepended with
+"no".
+
+  echo noprint-parent > /debug/tracing/trace_options
+
+To enable an option, leave off the "no".
+
+  echo sym-offset > /debug/tracing/trace_options
+
+Here are the available options:
+
+  print-parent - On function traces, display the calling (parent)
+		 function as well as the function being traced.
+
+  print-parent:
+   bash-4000  [01]  1477.606694: simple_strtoul <-strict_strtoul
+
+  noprint-parent:
+   bash-4000  [01]  1477.606694: simple_strtoul
+
+
+  sym-offset - Display not only the function name, but also the
+	       offset in the function. For example, instead of
+	       seeing just "ktime_get", you will see
+	       "ktime_get+0xb/0x20".
+
+  sym-offset:
+   bash-4000  [01]  1477.606694: simple_strtoul+0x6/0xa0
+
+  sym-addr - this will also display the function address as well
+	     as the function name.
+
+  sym-addr:
+   bash-4000  [01]  1477.606694: simple_strtoul <c0339346>
+
+  verbose - This deals with the latency_trace file.
+
+    bash  4000 1 0 00000000 00010a95 [58127d26] 1720.415ms \
+    (+0.000ms): simple_strtoul (strict_strtoul)
+
+  raw - This will display raw numbers. This option is best for
+	use with user applications that can translate the raw
+	numbers better than having it done in the kernel.
+
+  hex - Similar to raw, but the numbers will be in a hexadecimal
+	format.
+
+  bin - This will print out the formats in raw binary.
+
+  block - TBD (needs update)
+
+  stacktrace - This is one of the options that changes the trace
+	       itself. When a trace is recorded, so is the stack
+	       of functions. This allows for back traces of
+	       trace sites.
+
+  userstacktrace - This option changes the trace. It records a
+		   stacktrace of the current userspace thread.
+
+  sym-userobj - when user stacktrace are enabled, look up which
+		object the address belongs to, and print a
+		relative address. This is especially useful when
+		ASLR is on, otherwise you don't get a chance to
+		resolve the address to object/file/line after
+		the app is no longer running
+
+		The lookup is performed when you read
+		trace,trace_pipe,latency_trace. Example:
+
+		a.out-1623  [000] 40874.465068: /root/a.out[+0x480] <-/root/a.out[+0
+x494] <- /root/a.out[+0x4a8] <- /lib/libc-2.7.so[+0x1e1a6]
+
+  sched-tree - trace all tasks that are on the runqueue, at
+	       every scheduling event. Will add overhead if
+	       there's a lot of tasks running at once.
+
+
+sched_switch
+------------
+
+This tracer simply records schedule switches. Here is an example
+of how to use it.
+
+ # echo sched_switch > /debug/tracing/current_tracer
+ # echo 1 > /debug/tracing/tracing_enabled
+ # sleep 1
+ # echo 0 > /debug/tracing/tracing_enabled
+ # cat /debug/tracing/trace
+
+# tracer: sched_switch
+#
+#           TASK-PID   CPU#    TIMESTAMP  FUNCTION
+#              | |      |          |         |
+            bash-3997  [01]   240.132281:   3997:120:R   +  4055:120:R
+            bash-3997  [01]   240.132284:   3997:120:R ==>  4055:120:R
+           sleep-4055  [01]   240.132371:   4055:120:S ==>  3997:120:R
+            bash-3997  [01]   240.132454:   3997:120:R   +  4055:120:S
+            bash-3997  [01]   240.132457:   3997:120:R ==>  4055:120:R
+           sleep-4055  [01]   240.132460:   4055:120:D ==>  3997:120:R
+            bash-3997  [01]   240.132463:   3997:120:R   +  4055:120:D
+            bash-3997  [01]   240.132465:   3997:120:R ==>  4055:120:R
+          <idle>-0     [00]   240.132589:      0:140:R   +     4:115:S
+          <idle>-0     [00]   240.132591:      0:140:R ==>     4:115:R
+     ksoftirqd/0-4     [00]   240.132595:      4:115:S ==>     0:140:R
+          <idle>-0     [00]   240.132598:      0:140:R   +     4:115:S
+          <idle>-0     [00]   240.132599:      0:140:R ==>     4:115:R
+     ksoftirqd/0-4     [00]   240.132603:      4:115:S ==>     0:140:R
+           sleep-4055  [01]   240.133058:   4055:120:S ==>  3997:120:R
+ [...]
+
+
+As we have discussed previously about this format, the header
+shows the name of the trace and points to the options. The
+"FUNCTION" is a misnomer since here it represents the wake ups
+and context switches.
+
+The sched_switch file only lists the wake ups (represented with
+'+') and context switches ('==>') with the previous task or
+current task first followed by the next task or task waking up.
+The format for both of these is PID:KERNEL-PRIO:TASK-STATE.
+Remember that the KERNEL-PRIO is the inverse of the actual
+priority with zero (0) being the highest priority and the nice
+values starting at 100 (nice -20). Below is a quick chart to map
+the kernel priority to user land priorities.
+
+  Kernel priority: 0 to 99    ==> user RT priority 99 to 0
+  Kernel priority: 100 to 139 ==> user nice -20 to 19
+  Kernel priority: 140        ==> idle task priority
+
+The task states are:
+
+ R - running : wants to run, may not actually be running
+ S - sleep   : process is waiting to be woken up (handles signals)
+ D - disk sleep (uninterruptible sleep) : process must be woken up
+					(ignores signals)
+ T - stopped : process suspended
+ t - traced  : process is being traced (with something like gdb)
+ Z - zombie  : process waiting to be cleaned up
+ X - unknown
+
+
+ftrace_enabled
+--------------
+
+The following tracers (listed below) give different output
+depending on whether or not the sysctl ftrace_enabled is set. To
+set ftrace_enabled, one can either use the sysctl function or
+set it via the proc file system interface.
+
+  sysctl kernel.ftrace_enabled=1
+
+ or
+
+  echo 1 > /proc/sys/kernel/ftrace_enabled
+
+To disable ftrace_enabled simply replace the '1' with '0' in the
+above commands.
+
+When ftrace_enabled is set the tracers will also record the
+functions that are within the trace. The descriptions of the
+tracers will also show an example with ftrace enabled.
+
+
+irqsoff
+-------
+
+When interrupts are disabled, the CPU can not react to any other
+external event (besides NMIs and SMIs). This prevents the timer
+interrupt from triggering or the mouse interrupt from letting
+the kernel know of a new mouse event. The result is a latency
+with the reaction time.
+
+The irqsoff tracer tracks the time for which interrupts are
+disabled. When a new maximum latency is hit, the tracer saves
+the trace leading up to that latency point so that every time a
+new maximum is reached, the old saved trace is discarded and the
+new trace is saved.
+
+To reset the maximum, echo 0 into tracing_max_latency. Here is
+an example:
+
+ # echo irqsoff > /debug/tracing/current_tracer
+ # echo 0 > /debug/tracing/tracing_max_latency
+ # echo 1 > /debug/tracing/tracing_enabled
+ # ls -ltr
+ [...]
+ # echo 0 > /debug/tracing/tracing_enabled
+ # cat /debug/tracing/latency_trace
+# tracer: irqsoff
+#
+irqsoff latency trace v1.1.5 on 2.6.26
+--------------------------------------------------------------------
+ latency: 12 us, #3/3, CPU#1 | (M:preempt VP:0, KP:0, SP:0 HP:0 #P:2)
+    -----------------
+    | task: bash-3730 (uid:0 nice:0 policy:0 rt_prio:0)
+    -----------------
+ => started at: sys_setpgid
+ => ended at:   sys_setpgid
+
+#                _------=> CPU#
+#               / _-----=> irqs-off
+#              | / _----=> need-resched
+#              || / _---=> hardirq/softirq
+#              ||| / _--=> preempt-depth
+#              |||| /
+#              |||||     delay
+#  cmd     pid ||||| time  |   caller
+#     \   /    |||||   \   |   /
+    bash-3730  1d...    0us : _write_lock_irq (sys_setpgid)
+    bash-3730  1d..1    1us+: _write_unlock_irq (sys_setpgid)
+    bash-3730  1d..2   14us : trace_hardirqs_on (sys_setpgid)
+
+
+Here we see that that we had a latency of 12 microsecs (which is
+very good). The _write_lock_irq in sys_setpgid disabled
+interrupts. The difference between the 12 and the displayed
+timestamp 14us occurred because the clock was incremented
+between the time of recording the max latency and the time of
+recording the function that had that latency.
+
+Note the above example had ftrace_enabled not set. If we set the
+ftrace_enabled, we get a much larger output:
+
+# tracer: irqsoff
+#
+irqsoff latency trace v1.1.5 on 2.6.26-rc8
+--------------------------------------------------------------------
+ latency: 50 us, #101/101, CPU#0 | (M:preempt VP:0, KP:0, SP:0 HP:0 #P:2)
+    -----------------
+    | task: ls-4339 (uid:0 nice:0 policy:0 rt_prio:0)
+    -----------------
+ => started at: __alloc_pages_internal
+ => ended at:   __alloc_pages_internal
+
+#                _------=> CPU#
+#               / _-----=> irqs-off
+#              | / _----=> need-resched
+#              || / _---=> hardirq/softirq
+#              ||| / _--=> preempt-depth
+#              |||| /
+#              |||||     delay
+#  cmd     pid ||||| time  |   caller
+#     \   /    |||||   \   |   /
+      ls-4339  0...1    0us+: get_page_from_freelist (__alloc_pages_internal)
+      ls-4339  0d..1    3us : rmqueue_bulk (get_page_from_freelist)
+      ls-4339  0d..1    3us : _spin_lock (rmqueue_bulk)
+      ls-4339  0d..1    4us : add_preempt_count (_spin_lock)
+      ls-4339  0d..2    4us : __rmqueue (rmqueue_bulk)
+      ls-4339  0d..2    5us : __rmqueue_smallest (__rmqueue)
+      ls-4339  0d..2    5us : __mod_zone_page_state (__rmqueue_smallest)
+      ls-4339  0d..2    6us : __rmqueue (rmqueue_bulk)
+      ls-4339  0d..2    6us : __rmqueue_smallest (__rmqueue)
+      ls-4339  0d..2    7us : __mod_zone_page_state (__rmqueue_smallest)
+      ls-4339  0d..2    7us : __rmqueue (rmqueue_bulk)
+      ls-4339  0d..2    8us : __rmqueue_smallest (__rmqueue)
+[...]
+      ls-4339  0d..2   46us : __rmqueue_smallest (__rmqueue)
+      ls-4339  0d..2   47us : __mod_zone_page_state (__rmqueue_smallest)
+      ls-4339  0d..2   47us : __rmqueue (rmqueue_bulk)
+      ls-4339  0d..2   48us : __rmqueue_smallest (__rmqueue)
+      ls-4339  0d..2   48us : __mod_zone_page_state (__rmqueue_smallest)
+      ls-4339  0d..2   49us : _spin_unlock (rmqueue_bulk)
+      ls-4339  0d..2   49us : sub_preempt_count (_spin_unlock)
+      ls-4339  0d..1   50us : get_page_from_freelist (__alloc_pages_internal)
+      ls-4339  0d..2   51us : trace_hardirqs_on (__alloc_pages_internal)
+
+
+
+Here we traced a 50 microsecond latency. But we also see all the
+functions that were called during that time. Note that by
+enabling function tracing, we incur an added overhead. This
+overhead may extend the latency times. But nevertheless, this
+trace has provided some very helpful debugging information.
+
+
+preemptoff
+----------
+
+When preemption is disabled, we may be able to receive
+interrupts but the task cannot be preempted and a higher
+priority task must wait for preemption to be enabled again
+before it can preempt a lower priority task.
+
+The preemptoff tracer traces the places that disable preemption.
+Like the irqsoff tracer, it records the maximum latency for
+which preemption was disabled. The control of preemptoff tracer
+is much like the irqsoff tracer.
+
+ # echo preemptoff > /debug/tracing/current_tracer
+ # echo 0 > /debug/tracing/tracing_max_latency
+ # echo 1 > /debug/tracing/tracing_enabled
+ # ls -ltr
+ [...]
+ # echo 0 > /debug/tracing/tracing_enabled
+ # cat /debug/tracing/latency_trace
+# tracer: preemptoff
+#
+preemptoff latency trace v1.1.5 on 2.6.26-rc8
+--------------------------------------------------------------------
+ latency: 29 us, #3/3, CPU#0 | (M:preempt VP:0, KP:0, SP:0 HP:0 #P:2)
+    -----------------
+    | task: sshd-4261 (uid:0 nice:0 policy:0 rt_prio:0)
+    -----------------
+ => started at: do_IRQ
+ => ended at:   __do_softirq
+
+#                _------=> CPU#
+#               / _-----=> irqs-off
+#              | / _----=> need-resched
+#              || / _---=> hardirq/softirq
+#              ||| / _--=> preempt-depth
+#              |||| /
+#              |||||     delay
+#  cmd     pid ||||| time  |   caller
+#     \   /    |||||   \   |   /
+    sshd-4261  0d.h.    0us+: irq_enter (do_IRQ)
+    sshd-4261  0d.s.   29us : _local_bh_enable (__do_softirq)
+    sshd-4261  0d.s1   30us : trace_preempt_on (__do_softirq)
+
+
+This has some more changes. Preemption was disabled when an
+interrupt came in (notice the 'h'), and was enabled while doing
+a softirq. (notice the 's'). But we also see that interrupts
+have been disabled when entering the preempt off section and
+leaving it (the 'd'). We do not know if interrupts were enabled
+in the mean time.
+
+# tracer: preemptoff
+#
+preemptoff latency trace v1.1.5 on 2.6.26-rc8
+--------------------------------------------------------------------
+ latency: 63 us, #87/87, CPU#0 | (M:preempt VP:0, KP:0, SP:0 HP:0 #P:2)
+    -----------------
+    | task: sshd-4261 (uid:0 nice:0 policy:0 rt_prio:0)
+    -----------------
+ => started at: remove_wait_queue
+ => ended at:   __do_softirq
+
+#                _------=> CPU#
+#               / _-----=> irqs-off
+#              | / _----=> need-resched
+#              || / _---=> hardirq/softirq
+#              ||| / _--=> preempt-depth
+#              |||| /
+#              |||||     delay
+#  cmd     pid ||||| time  |   caller
+#     \   /    |||||   \   |   /
+    sshd-4261  0d..1    0us : _spin_lock_irqsave (remove_wait_queue)
+    sshd-4261  0d..1    1us : _spin_unlock_irqrestore (remove_wait_queue)
+    sshd-4261  0d..1    2us : do_IRQ (common_interrupt)
+    sshd-4261  0d..1    2us : irq_enter (do_IRQ)
+    sshd-4261  0d..1    2us : idle_cpu (irq_enter)
+    sshd-4261  0d..1    3us : add_preempt_count (irq_enter)
+    sshd-4261  0d.h1    3us : idle_cpu (irq_enter)
+    sshd-4261  0d.h.    4us : handle_fasteoi_irq (do_IRQ)
+[...]
+    sshd-4261  0d.h.   12us : add_preempt_count (_spin_lock)
+    sshd-4261  0d.h1   12us : ack_ioapic_quirk_irq (handle_fasteoi_irq)
+    sshd-4261  0d.h1   13us : move_native_irq (ack_ioapic_quirk_irq)
+    sshd-4261  0d.h1   13us : _spin_unlock (handle_fasteoi_irq)
+    sshd-4261  0d.h1   14us : sub_preempt_count (_spin_unlock)
+    sshd-4261  0d.h1   14us : irq_exit (do_IRQ)
+    sshd-4261  0d.h1   15us : sub_preempt_count (irq_exit)
+    sshd-4261  0d..2   15us : do_softirq (irq_exit)
+    sshd-4261  0d...   15us : __do_softirq (do_softirq)
+    sshd-4261  0d...   16us : __local_bh_disable (__do_softirq)
+    sshd-4261  0d...   16us+: add_preempt_count (__local_bh_disable)
+    sshd-4261  0d.s4   20us : add_preempt_count (__local_bh_disable)
+    sshd-4261  0d.s4   21us : sub_preempt_count (local_bh_enable)
+    sshd-4261  0d.s5   21us : sub_preempt_count (local_bh_enable)
+[...]
+    sshd-4261  0d.s6   41us : add_preempt_count (__local_bh_disable)
+    sshd-4261  0d.s6   42us : sub_preempt_count (local_bh_enable)
+    sshd-4261  0d.s7   42us : sub_preempt_count (local_bh_enable)
+    sshd-4261  0d.s5   43us : add_preempt_count (__local_bh_disable)
+    sshd-4261  0d.s5   43us : sub_preempt_count (local_bh_enable_ip)
+    sshd-4261  0d.s6   44us : sub_preempt_count (local_bh_enable_ip)
+    sshd-4261  0d.s5   44us : add_preempt_count (__local_bh_disable)
+    sshd-4261  0d.s5   45us : sub_preempt_count (local_bh_enable)
+[...]
+    sshd-4261  0d.s.   63us : _local_bh_enable (__do_softirq)
+    sshd-4261  0d.s1   64us : trace_preempt_on (__do_softirq)
+
+
+The above is an example of the preemptoff trace with
+ftrace_enabled set. Here we see that interrupts were disabled
+the entire time. The irq_enter code lets us know that we entered
+an interrupt 'h'. Before that, the functions being traced still
+show that it is not in an interrupt, but we can see from the
+functions themselves that this is not the case.
+
+Notice that __do_softirq when called does not have a
+preempt_count. It may seem that we missed a preempt enabling.
+What really happened is that the preempt count is held on the
+thread's stack and we switched to the softirq stack (4K stacks
+in effect). The code does not copy the preempt count, but
+because interrupts are disabled, we do not need to worry about
+it. Having a tracer like this is good for letting people know
+what really happens inside the kernel.
+
+
+preemptirqsoff
+--------------
+
+Knowing the locations that have interrupts disabled or
+preemption disabled for the longest times is helpful. But
+sometimes we would like to know when either preemption and/or
+interrupts are disabled.
+
+Consider the following code:
+
+    local_irq_disable();
+    call_function_with_irqs_off();
+    preempt_disable();
+    call_function_with_irqs_and_preemption_off();
+    local_irq_enable();
+    call_function_with_preemption_off();
+    preempt_enable();
+
+The irqsoff tracer will record the total length of
+call_function_with_irqs_off() and
+call_function_with_irqs_and_preemption_off().
+
+The preemptoff tracer will record the total length of
+call_function_with_irqs_and_preemption_off() and
+call_function_with_preemption_off().
+
+But neither will trace the time that interrupts and/or
+preemption is disabled. This total time is the time that we can
+not schedule. To record this time, use the preemptirqsoff
+tracer.
+
+Again, using this trace is much like the irqsoff and preemptoff
+tracers.
+
+ # echo preemptirqsoff > /debug/tracing/current_tracer
+ # echo 0 > /debug/tracing/tracing_max_latency
+ # echo 1 > /debug/tracing/tracing_enabled
+ # ls -ltr
+ [...]
+ # echo 0 > /debug/tracing/tracing_enabled
+ # cat /debug/tracing/latency_trace
+# tracer: preemptirqsoff
+#
+preemptirqsoff latency trace v1.1.5 on 2.6.26-rc8
+--------------------------------------------------------------------
+ latency: 293 us, #3/3, CPU#0 | (M:preempt VP:0, KP:0, SP:0 HP:0 #P:2)
+    -----------------
+    | task: ls-4860 (uid:0 nice:0 policy:0 rt_prio:0)
+    -----------------
+ => started at: apic_timer_interrupt
+ => ended at:   __do_softirq
+
+#                _------=> CPU#
+#               / _-----=> irqs-off
+#              | / _----=> need-resched
+#              || / _---=> hardirq/softirq
+#              ||| / _--=> preempt-depth
+#              |||| /
+#              |||||     delay
+#  cmd     pid ||||| time  |   caller
+#     \   /    |||||   \   |   /
+      ls-4860  0d...    0us!: trace_hardirqs_off_thunk (apic_timer_interrupt)
+      ls-4860  0d.s.  294us : _local_bh_enable (__do_softirq)
+      ls-4860  0d.s1  294us : trace_preempt_on (__do_softirq)
+
+
+
+The trace_hardirqs_off_thunk is called from assembly on x86 when
+interrupts are disabled in the assembly code. Without the
+function tracing, we do not know if interrupts were enabled
+within the preemption points. We do see that it started with
+preemption enabled.
+
+Here is a trace with ftrace_enabled set:
+
+
+# tracer: preemptirqsoff
+#
+preemptirqsoff latency trace v1.1.5 on 2.6.26-rc8
+--------------------------------------------------------------------
+ latency: 105 us, #183/183, CPU#0 | (M:preempt VP:0, KP:0, SP:0 HP:0 #P:2)
+    -----------------
+    | task: sshd-4261 (uid:0 nice:0 policy:0 rt_prio:0)
+    -----------------
+ => started at: write_chan
+ => ended at:   __do_softirq
+
+#                _------=> CPU#
+#               / _-----=> irqs-off
+#              | / _----=> need-resched
+#              || / _---=> hardirq/softirq
+#              ||| / _--=> preempt-depth
+#              |||| /
+#              |||||     delay
+#  cmd     pid ||||| time  |   caller
+#     \   /    |||||   \   |   /
+      ls-4473  0.N..    0us : preempt_schedule (write_chan)
+      ls-4473  0dN.1    1us : _spin_lock (schedule)
+      ls-4473  0dN.1    2us : add_preempt_count (_spin_lock)
+      ls-4473  0d..2    2us : put_prev_task_fair (schedule)
+[...]
+      ls-4473  0d..2   13us : set_normalized_timespec (ktime_get_ts)
+      ls-4473  0d..2   13us : __switch_to (schedule)
+    sshd-4261  0d..2   14us : finish_task_switch (schedule)
+    sshd-4261  0d..2   14us : _spin_unlock_irq (finish_task_switch)
+    sshd-4261  0d..1   15us : add_preempt_count (_spin_lock_irqsave)
+    sshd-4261  0d..2   16us : _spin_unlock_irqrestore (hrtick_set)
+    sshd-4261  0d..2   16us : do_IRQ (common_interrupt)
+    sshd-4261  0d..2   17us : irq_enter (do_IRQ)
+    sshd-4261  0d..2   17us : idle_cpu (irq_enter)
+    sshd-4261  0d..2   18us : add_preempt_count (irq_enter)
+    sshd-4261  0d.h2   18us : idle_cpu (irq_enter)
+    sshd-4261  0d.h.   18us : handle_fasteoi_irq (do_IRQ)
+    sshd-4261  0d.h.   19us : _spin_lock (handle_fasteoi_irq)
+    sshd-4261  0d.h.   19us : add_preempt_count (_spin_lock)
+    sshd-4261  0d.h1   20us : _spin_unlock (handle_fasteoi_irq)
+    sshd-4261  0d.h1   20us : sub_preempt_count (_spin_unlock)
+[...]
+    sshd-4261  0d.h1   28us : _spin_unlock (handle_fasteoi_irq)
+    sshd-4261  0d.h1   29us : sub_preempt_count (_spin_unlock)
+    sshd-4261  0d.h2   29us : irq_exit (do_IRQ)
+    sshd-4261  0d.h2   29us : sub_preempt_count (irq_exit)
+    sshd-4261  0d..3   30us : do_softirq (irq_exit)
+    sshd-4261  0d...   30us : __do_softirq (do_softirq)
+    sshd-4261  0d...   31us : __local_bh_disable (__do_softirq)
+    sshd-4261  0d...   31us+: add_preempt_count (__local_bh_disable)
+    sshd-4261  0d.s4   34us : add_preempt_count (__local_bh_disable)
+[...]
+    sshd-4261  0d.s3   43us : sub_preempt_count (local_bh_enable_ip)
+    sshd-4261  0d.s4   44us : sub_preempt_count (local_bh_enable_ip)
+    sshd-4261  0d.s3   44us : smp_apic_timer_interrupt (apic_timer_interrupt)
+    sshd-4261  0d.s3   45us : irq_enter (smp_apic_timer_interrupt)
+    sshd-4261  0d.s3   45us : idle_cpu (irq_enter)
+    sshd-4261  0d.s3   46us : add_preempt_count (irq_enter)
+    sshd-4261  0d.H3   46us : idle_cpu (irq_enter)
+    sshd-4261  0d.H3   47us : hrtimer_interrupt (smp_apic_timer_interrupt)
+    sshd-4261  0d.H3   47us : ktime_get (hrtimer_interrupt)
+[...]
+    sshd-4261  0d.H3   81us : tick_program_event (hrtimer_interrupt)
+    sshd-4261  0d.H3   82us : ktime_get (tick_program_event)
+    sshd-4261  0d.H3   82us : ktime_get_ts (ktime_get)
+    sshd-4261  0d.H3   83us : getnstimeofday (ktime_get_ts)
+    sshd-4261  0d.H3   83us : set_normalized_timespec (ktime_get_ts)
+    sshd-4261  0d.H3   84us : clockevents_program_event (tick_program_event)
+    sshd-4261  0d.H3   84us : lapic_next_event (clockevents_program_event)
+    sshd-4261  0d.H3   85us : irq_exit (smp_apic_timer_interrupt)
+    sshd-4261  0d.H3   85us : sub_preempt_count (irq_exit)
+    sshd-4261  0d.s4   86us : sub_preempt_count (irq_exit)
+    sshd-4261  0d.s3   86us : add_preempt_count (__local_bh_disable)
+[...]
+    sshd-4261  0d.s1   98us : sub_preempt_count (net_rx_action)
+    sshd-4261  0d.s.   99us : add_preempt_count (_spin_lock_irq)
+    sshd-4261  0d.s1   99us+: _spin_unlock_irq (run_timer_softirq)
+    sshd-4261  0d.s.  104us : _local_bh_enable (__do_softirq)
+    sshd-4261  0d.s.  104us : sub_preempt_count (_local_bh_enable)
+    sshd-4261  0d.s.  105us : _local_bh_enable (__do_softirq)
+    sshd-4261  0d.s1  105us : trace_preempt_on (__do_softirq)
+
+
+This is a very interesting trace. It started with the preemption
+of the ls task. We see that the task had the "need_resched" bit
+set via the 'N' in the trace.  Interrupts were disabled before
+the spin_lock at the beginning of the trace. We see that a
+schedule took place to run sshd.  When the interrupts were
+enabled, we took an interrupt. On return from the interrupt
+handler, the softirq ran. We took another interrupt while
+running the softirq as we see from the capital 'H'.
+
+
+wakeup
+------
+
+In a Real-Time environment it is very important to know the
+wakeup time it takes for the highest priority task that is woken
+up to the time that it executes. This is also known as "schedule
+latency". I stress the point that this is about RT tasks. It is
+also important to know the scheduling latency of non-RT tasks,
+but the average schedule latency is better for non-RT tasks.
+Tools like LatencyTop are more appropriate for such
+measurements.
+
+Real-Time environments are interested in the worst case latency.
+That is the longest latency it takes for something to happen,
+and not the average. We can have a very fast scheduler that may
+only have a large latency once in a while, but that would not
+work well with Real-Time tasks.  The wakeup tracer was designed
+to record the worst case wakeups of RT tasks. Non-RT tasks are
+not recorded because the tracer only records one worst case and
+tracing non-RT tasks that are unpredictable will overwrite the
+worst case latency of RT tasks.
+
+Since this tracer only deals with RT tasks, we will run this
+slightly differently than we did with the previous tracers.
+Instead of performing an 'ls', we will run 'sleep 1' under
+'chrt' which changes the priority of the task.
+
+ # echo wakeup > /debug/tracing/current_tracer
+ # echo 0 > /debug/tracing/tracing_max_latency
+ # echo 1 > /debug/tracing/tracing_enabled
+ # chrt -f 5 sleep 1
+ # echo 0 > /debug/tracing/tracing_enabled
+ # cat /debug/tracing/latency_trace
+# tracer: wakeup
+#
+wakeup latency trace v1.1.5 on 2.6.26-rc8
+--------------------------------------------------------------------
+ latency: 4 us, #2/2, CPU#1 | (M:preempt VP:0, KP:0, SP:0 HP:0 #P:2)
+    -----------------
+    | task: sleep-4901 (uid:0 nice:0 policy:1 rt_prio:5)
+    -----------------
+
+#                _------=> CPU#
+#               / _-----=> irqs-off
+#              | / _----=> need-resched
+#              || / _---=> hardirq/softirq
+#              ||| / _--=> preempt-depth
+#              |||| /
+#              |||||     delay
+#  cmd     pid ||||| time  |   caller
+#     \   /    |||||   \   |   /
+  <idle>-0     1d.h4    0us+: try_to_wake_up (wake_up_process)
+  <idle>-0     1d..4    4us : schedule (cpu_idle)
+
+
+Running this on an idle system, we see that it only took 4
+microseconds to perform the task switch.  Note, since the trace
+marker in the schedule is before the actual "switch", we stop
+the tracing when the recorded task is about to schedule in. This
+may change if we add a new marker at the end of the scheduler.
+
+Notice that the recorded task is 'sleep' with the PID of 4901
+and it has an rt_prio of 5. This priority is user-space priority
+and not the internal kernel priority. The policy is 1 for
+SCHED_FIFO and 2 for SCHED_RR.
+
+Doing the same with chrt -r 5 and ftrace_enabled set.
+
+# tracer: wakeup
+#
+wakeup latency trace v1.1.5 on 2.6.26-rc8
+--------------------------------------------------------------------
+ latency: 50 us, #60/60, CPU#1 | (M:preempt VP:0, KP:0, SP:0 HP:0 #P:2)
+    -----------------
+    | task: sleep-4068 (uid:0 nice:0 policy:2 rt_prio:5)
+    -----------------
+
+#                _------=> CPU#
+#               / _-----=> irqs-off
+#              | / _----=> need-resched
+#              || / _---=> hardirq/softirq
+#              ||| / _--=> preempt-depth
+#              |||| /
+#              |||||     delay
+#  cmd     pid ||||| time  |   caller
+#     \   /    |||||   \   |   /
+ksoftirq-7     1d.H3    0us : try_to_wake_up (wake_up_process)
+ksoftirq-7     1d.H4    1us : sub_preempt_count (marker_probe_cb)
+ksoftirq-7     1d.H3    2us : check_preempt_wakeup (try_to_wake_up)
+ksoftirq-7     1d.H3    3us : update_curr (check_preempt_wakeup)
+ksoftirq-7     1d.H3    4us : calc_delta_mine (update_curr)
+ksoftirq-7     1d.H3    5us : __resched_task (check_preempt_wakeup)
+ksoftirq-7     1d.H3    6us : task_wake_up_rt (try_to_wake_up)
+ksoftirq-7     1d.H3    7us : _spin_unlock_irqrestore (try_to_wake_up)
+[...]
+ksoftirq-7     1d.H2   17us : irq_exit (smp_apic_timer_interrupt)
+ksoftirq-7     1d.H2   18us : sub_preempt_count (irq_exit)
+ksoftirq-7     1d.s3   19us : sub_preempt_count (irq_exit)
+ksoftirq-7     1..s2   20us : rcu_process_callbacks (__do_softirq)
+[...]
+ksoftirq-7     1..s2   26us : __rcu_process_callbacks (rcu_process_callbacks)
+ksoftirq-7     1d.s2   27us : _local_bh_enable (__do_softirq)
+ksoftirq-7     1d.s2   28us : sub_preempt_count (_local_bh_enable)
+ksoftirq-7     1.N.3   29us : sub_preempt_count (ksoftirqd)
+ksoftirq-7     1.N.2   30us : _cond_resched (ksoftirqd)
+ksoftirq-7     1.N.2   31us : __cond_resched (_cond_resched)
+ksoftirq-7     1.N.2   32us : add_preempt_count (__cond_resched)
+ksoftirq-7     1.N.2   33us : schedule (__cond_resched)
+ksoftirq-7     1.N.2   33us : add_preempt_count (schedule)
+ksoftirq-7     1.N.3   34us : hrtick_clear (schedule)
+ksoftirq-7     1dN.3   35us : _spin_lock (schedule)
+ksoftirq-7     1dN.3   36us : add_preempt_count (_spin_lock)
+ksoftirq-7     1d..4   37us : put_prev_task_fair (schedule)
+ksoftirq-7     1d..4   38us : update_curr (put_prev_task_fair)
+[...]
+ksoftirq-7     1d..5   47us : _spin_trylock (tracing_record_cmdline)
+ksoftirq-7     1d..5   48us : add_preempt_count (_spin_trylock)
+ksoftirq-7     1d..6   49us : _spin_unlock (tracing_record_cmdline)
+ksoftirq-7     1d..6   49us : sub_preempt_count (_spin_unlock)
+ksoftirq-7     1d..4   50us : schedule (__cond_resched)
+
+The interrupt went off while running ksoftirqd. This task runs
+at SCHED_OTHER. Why did not we see the 'N' set early? This may
+be a harmless bug with x86_32 and 4K stacks. On x86_32 with 4K
+stacks configured, the interrupt and softirq run with their own
+stack. Some information is held on the top of the task's stack
+(need_resched and preempt_count are both stored there). The
+setting of the NEED_RESCHED bit is done directly to the task's
+stack, but the reading of the NEED_RESCHED is done by looking at
+the current stack, which in this case is the stack for the hard
+interrupt. This hides the fact that NEED_RESCHED has been set.
+We do not see the 'N' until we switch back to the task's
+assigned stack.
+
+function
+--------
+
+This tracer is the function tracer. Enabling the function tracer
+can be done from the debug file system. Make sure the
+ftrace_enabled is set; otherwise this tracer is a nop.
+
+ # sysctl kernel.ftrace_enabled=1
+ # echo function > /debug/tracing/current_tracer
+ # echo 1 > /debug/tracing/tracing_enabled
+ # usleep 1
+ # echo 0 > /debug/tracing/tracing_enabled
+ # cat /debug/tracing/trace
+# tracer: function
+#
+#           TASK-PID   CPU#    TIMESTAMP  FUNCTION
+#              | |      |          |         |
+            bash-4003  [00]   123.638713: finish_task_switch <-schedule
+            bash-4003  [00]   123.638714: _spin_unlock_irq <-finish_task_switch
+            bash-4003  [00]   123.638714: sub_preempt_count <-_spin_unlock_irq
+            bash-4003  [00]   123.638715: hrtick_set <-schedule
+            bash-4003  [00]   123.638715: _spin_lock_irqsave <-hrtick_set
+            bash-4003  [00]   123.638716: add_preempt_count <-_spin_lock_irqsave
+            bash-4003  [00]   123.638716: _spin_unlock_irqrestore <-hrtick_set
+            bash-4003  [00]   123.638717: sub_preempt_count <-_spin_unlock_irqrestore
+            bash-4003  [00]   123.638717: hrtick_clear <-hrtick_set
+            bash-4003  [00]   123.638718: sub_preempt_count <-schedule
+            bash-4003  [00]   123.638718: sub_preempt_count <-preempt_schedule
+            bash-4003  [00]   123.638719: wait_for_completion <-__stop_machine_run
+            bash-4003  [00]   123.638719: wait_for_common <-wait_for_completion
+            bash-4003  [00]   123.638720: _spin_lock_irq <-wait_for_common
+            bash-4003  [00]   123.638720: add_preempt_count <-_spin_lock_irq
+[...]
+
+
+Note: function tracer uses ring buffers to store the above
+entries. The newest data may overwrite the oldest data.
+Sometimes using echo to stop the trace is not sufficient because
+the tracing could have overwritten the data that you wanted to
+record. For this reason, it is sometimes better to disable
+tracing directly from a program. This allows you to stop the
+tracing at the point that you hit the part that you are
+interested in. To disable the tracing directly from a C program,
+something like following code snippet can be used:
+
+int trace_fd;
+[...]
+int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
+	[...]
+	trace_fd = open("/debug/tracing/tracing_enabled", O_WRONLY);
+	[...]
+	if (condition_hit()) {
+		write(trace_fd, "0", 1);
+	}
+	[...]
+}
+
+Note: Here we hard coded the path name. The debugfs mount is not
+guaranteed to be at /debug (and is more commonly at
+/sys/kernel/debug). For simple one time traces, the above is
+sufficent. For anything else, a search through /proc/mounts may
+be needed to find where the debugfs file-system is mounted.
+
+
+Single thread tracing
+---------------------
+
+By writing into /debug/tracing/set_ftrace_pid you can trace a
+single thread. For example:
+
+# cat /debug/tracing/set_ftrace_pid
+no pid
+# echo 3111 > /debug/tracing/set_ftrace_pid
+# cat /debug/tracing/set_ftrace_pid
+3111
+# echo function > /debug/tracing/current_tracer
+# cat /debug/tracing/trace | head
+ # tracer: function
+ #
+ #           TASK-PID    CPU#    TIMESTAMP  FUNCTION
+ #              | |       |          |         |
+     yum-updatesd-3111  [003]  1637.254676: finish_task_switch <-thread_return
+     yum-updatesd-3111  [003]  1637.254681: hrtimer_cancel <-schedule_hrtimeout_range
+     yum-updatesd-3111  [003]  1637.254682: hrtimer_try_to_cancel <-hrtimer_cancel
+     yum-updatesd-3111  [003]  1637.254683: lock_hrtimer_base <-hrtimer_try_to_cancel
+     yum-updatesd-3111  [003]  1637.254685: fget_light <-do_sys_poll
+     yum-updatesd-3111  [003]  1637.254686: pipe_poll <-do_sys_poll
+# echo -1 > /debug/tracing/set_ftrace_pid
+# cat /debug/tracing/trace |head
+ # tracer: function
+ #
+ #           TASK-PID    CPU#    TIMESTAMP  FUNCTION
+ #              | |       |          |         |
+ ##### CPU 3 buffer started ####
+     yum-updatesd-3111  [003]  1701.957688: free_poll_entry <-poll_freewait
+     yum-updatesd-3111  [003]  1701.957689: remove_wait_queue <-free_poll_entry
+     yum-updatesd-3111  [003]  1701.957691: fput <-free_poll_entry
+     yum-updatesd-3111  [003]  1701.957692: audit_syscall_exit <-sysret_audit
+     yum-updatesd-3111  [003]  1701.957693: path_put <-audit_syscall_exit
+
+If you want to trace a function when executing, you could use
+something like this simple program:
+
+#include <stdio.h>
+#include <stdlib.h>
+#include <sys/types.h>
+#include <sys/stat.h>
+#include <fcntl.h>
+#include <unistd.h>
+
+int main (int argc, char **argv)
+{
+        if (argc < 1)
+                exit(-1);
+
+        if (fork() > 0) {
+                int fd, ffd;
+                char line[64];
+                int s;
+
+                ffd = open("/debug/tracing/current_tracer", O_WRONLY);
+                if (ffd < 0)
+                        exit(-1);
+                write(ffd, "nop", 3);
+
+                fd = open("/debug/tracing/set_ftrace_pid", O_WRONLY);
+                s = sprintf(line, "%d\n", getpid());
+                write(fd, line, s);
+
+                write(ffd, "function", 8);
+
+                close(fd);
+                close(ffd);
+
+                execvp(argv[1], argv+1);
+        }
+
+        return 0;
+}
+
+
+hw-branch-tracer (x86 only)
+---------------------------
+
+This tracer uses the x86 last branch tracing hardware feature to
+collect a branch trace on all cpus with relatively low overhead.
+
+The tracer uses a fixed-size circular buffer per cpu and only
+traces ring 0 branches. The trace file dumps that buffer in the
+following format:
+
+# tracer: hw-branch-tracer
+#
+# CPU#        TO  <-  FROM
+   0  scheduler_tick+0xb5/0x1bf	  <-  task_tick_idle+0x5/0x6
+   2  run_posix_cpu_timers+0x2b/0x72a	  <-  run_posix_cpu_timers+0x25/0x72a
+   0  scheduler_tick+0x139/0x1bf	  <-  scheduler_tick+0xed/0x1bf
+   0  scheduler_tick+0x17c/0x1bf	  <-  scheduler_tick+0x148/0x1bf
+   2  run_posix_cpu_timers+0x9e/0x72a	  <-  run_posix_cpu_timers+0x5e/0x72a
+   0  scheduler_tick+0x1b6/0x1bf	  <-  scheduler_tick+0x1aa/0x1bf
+
+
+The tracer may be used to dump the trace for the oops'ing cpu on
+a kernel oops into the system log. To enable this,
+ftrace_dump_on_oops must be set. To set ftrace_dump_on_oops, one
+can either use the sysctl function or set it via the proc system
+interface.
+
+  sysctl kernel.ftrace_dump_on_oops=1
+
+or
+
+  echo 1 > /proc/sys/kernel/ftrace_dump_on_oops
+
+
+Here's an example of such a dump after a null pointer
+dereference in a kernel module:
+
+[57848.105921] BUG: unable to handle kernel NULL pointer dereference at 0000000000000000
+[57848.106019] IP: [<ffffffffa0000006>] open+0x6/0x14 [oops]
+[57848.106019] PGD 2354e9067 PUD 2375e7067 PMD 0
+[57848.106019] Oops: 0002 [#1] SMP
+[57848.106019] last sysfs file: /sys/devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:1e.0/0000:20:05.0/local_cpus
+[57848.106019] Dumping ftrace buffer:
+[57848.106019] ---------------------------------
+[...]
+[57848.106019]    0  chrdev_open+0xe6/0x165	  <-  cdev_put+0x23/0x24
+[57848.106019]    0  chrdev_open+0x117/0x165	  <-  chrdev_open+0xfa/0x165
+[57848.106019]    0  chrdev_open+0x120/0x165	  <-  chrdev_open+0x11c/0x165
+[57848.106019]    0  chrdev_open+0x134/0x165	  <-  chrdev_open+0x12b/0x165
+[57848.106019]    0  open+0x0/0x14 [oops]	  <-  chrdev_open+0x144/0x165
+[57848.106019]    0  page_fault+0x0/0x30	  <-  open+0x6/0x14 [oops]
+[57848.106019]    0  error_entry+0x0/0x5b	  <-  page_fault+0x4/0x30
+[57848.106019]    0  error_kernelspace+0x0/0x31	  <-  error_entry+0x59/0x5b
+[57848.106019]    0  error_sti+0x0/0x1	  <-  error_kernelspace+0x2d/0x31
+[57848.106019]    0  page_fault+0x9/0x30	  <-  error_sti+0x0/0x1
+[57848.106019]    0  do_page_fault+0x0/0x881	  <-  page_fault+0x1a/0x30
+[...]
+[57848.106019]    0  do_page_fault+0x66b/0x881	  <-  is_prefetch+0x1ee/0x1f2
+[57848.106019]    0  do_page_fault+0x6e0/0x881	  <-  do_page_fault+0x67a/0x881
+[57848.106019]    0  oops_begin+0x0/0x96	  <-  do_page_fault+0x6e0/0x881
+[57848.106019]    0  trace_hw_branch_oops+0x0/0x2d	  <-  oops_begin+0x9/0x96
+[...]
+[57848.106019]    0  ds_suspend_bts+0x2a/0xe3	  <-  ds_suspend_bts+0x1a/0xe3
+[57848.106019] ---------------------------------
+[57848.106019] CPU 0
+[57848.106019] Modules linked in: oops
+[57848.106019] Pid: 5542, comm: cat Tainted: G        W  2.6.28 #23
+[57848.106019] RIP: 0010:[<ffffffffa0000006>]  [<ffffffffa0000006>] open+0x6/0x14 [oops]
+[57848.106019] RSP: 0018:ffff880235457d48  EFLAGS: 00010246
+[...]
+
+
+function graph tracer
+---------------------------
+
+This tracer is similar to the function tracer except that it
+probes a function on its entry and its exit. This is done by
+using a dynamically allocated stack of return addresses in each
+task_struct. On function entry the tracer overwrites the return
+address of each function traced to set a custom probe. Thus the
+original return address is stored on the stack of return address
+in the task_struct.
+
+Probing on both ends of a function leads to special features
+such as:
+
+- measure of a function's time execution
+- having a reliable call stack to draw function calls graph
+
+This tracer is useful in several situations:
+
+- you want to find the reason of a strange kernel behavior and
+  need to see what happens in detail on any areas (or specific
+  ones).
+
+- you are experiencing weird latencies but it's difficult to
+  find its origin.
+
+- you want to find quickly which path is taken by a specific
+  function
+
+- you just want to peek inside a working kernel and want to see
+  what happens there.
+
+# tracer: function_graph
+#
+# CPU  DURATION                  FUNCTION CALLS
+# |     |   |                     |   |   |   |
+
+ 0)               |  sys_open() {
+ 0)               |    do_sys_open() {
+ 0)               |      getname() {
+ 0)               |        kmem_cache_alloc() {
+ 0)   1.382 us    |          __might_sleep();
+ 0)   2.478 us    |        }
+ 0)               |        strncpy_from_user() {
+ 0)               |          might_fault() {
+ 0)   1.389 us    |            __might_sleep();
+ 0)   2.553 us    |          }
+ 0)   3.807 us    |        }
+ 0)   7.876 us    |      }
+ 0)               |      alloc_fd() {
+ 0)   0.668 us    |        _spin_lock();
+ 0)   0.570 us    |        expand_files();
+ 0)   0.586 us    |        _spin_unlock();
+
+
+There are several columns that can be dynamically
+enabled/disabled. You can use every combination of options you
+want, depending on your needs.
+
+- The cpu number on which the function executed is default
+  enabled.  It is sometimes better to only trace one cpu (see
+  tracing_cpu_mask file) or you might sometimes see unordered
+  function calls while cpu tracing switch.
+
+	hide: echo nofuncgraph-cpu > /debug/tracing/trace_options
+	show: echo funcgraph-cpu > /debug/tracing/trace_options
+
+- The duration (function's time of execution) is displayed on
+  the closing bracket line of a function or on the same line
+  than the current function in case of a leaf one. It is default
+  enabled.
+
+	hide: echo nofuncgraph-duration > /debug/tracing/trace_options
+	show: echo funcgraph-duration > /debug/tracing/trace_options
+
+- The overhead field precedes the duration field in case of
+  reached duration thresholds.
+
+	hide: echo nofuncgraph-overhead > /debug/tracing/trace_options
+	show: echo funcgraph-overhead > /debug/tracing/trace_options
+	depends on: funcgraph-duration
+
+  ie:
+
+  0)               |    up_write() {
+  0)   0.646 us    |      _spin_lock_irqsave();
+  0)   0.684 us    |      _spin_unlock_irqrestore();
+  0)   3.123 us    |    }
+  0)   0.548 us    |    fput();
+  0) + 58.628 us   |  }
+
+  [...]
+
+  0)               |      putname() {
+  0)               |        kmem_cache_free() {
+  0)   0.518 us    |          __phys_addr();
+  0)   1.757 us    |        }
+  0)   2.861 us    |      }
+  0) ! 115.305 us  |    }
+  0) ! 116.402 us  |  }
+
+  + means that the function exceeded 10 usecs.
+  ! means that the function exceeded 100 usecs.
+
+
+- The task/pid field displays the thread cmdline and pid which
+  executed the function. It is default disabled.
+
+	hide: echo nofuncgraph-proc > /debug/tracing/trace_options
+	show: echo funcgraph-proc > /debug/tracing/trace_options
+
+  ie:
+
+  # tracer: function_graph
+  #
+  # CPU  TASK/PID        DURATION                  FUNCTION CALLS
+  # |    |    |           |   |                     |   |   |   |
+  0)    sh-4802     |               |                  d_free() {
+  0)    sh-4802     |               |                    call_rcu() {
+  0)    sh-4802     |               |                      __call_rcu() {
+  0)    sh-4802     |   0.616 us    |                        rcu_process_gp_end();
+  0)    sh-4802     |   0.586 us    |                        check_for_new_grace_period();
+  0)    sh-4802     |   2.899 us    |                      }
+  0)    sh-4802     |   4.040 us    |                    }
+  0)    sh-4802     |   5.151 us    |                  }
+  0)    sh-4802     | + 49.370 us   |                }
+
+
+- The absolute time field is an absolute timestamp given by the
+  system clock since it started. A snapshot of this time is
+  given on each entry/exit of functions
+
+	hide: echo nofuncgraph-abstime > /debug/tracing/trace_options
+	show: echo funcgraph-abstime > /debug/tracing/trace_options
+
+  ie:
+
+  #
+  #      TIME       CPU  DURATION                  FUNCTION CALLS
+  #       |         |     |   |                     |   |   |   |
+  360.774522 |   1)   0.541 us    |                                          }
+  360.774522 |   1)   4.663 us    |                                        }
+  360.774523 |   1)   0.541 us    |                                        __wake_up_bit();
+  360.774524 |   1)   6.796 us    |                                      }
+  360.774524 |   1)   7.952 us    |                                    }
+  360.774525 |   1)   9.063 us    |                                  }
+  360.774525 |   1)   0.615 us    |                                  journal_mark_dirty();
+  360.774527 |   1)   0.578 us    |                                  __brelse();
+  360.774528 |   1)               |                                  reiserfs_prepare_for_journal() {
+  360.774528 |   1)               |                                    unlock_buffer() {
+  360.774529 |   1)               |                                      wake_up_bit() {
+  360.774529 |   1)               |                                        bit_waitqueue() {
+  360.774530 |   1)   0.594 us    |                                          __phys_addr();
+
+
+You can put some comments on specific functions by using
+trace_printk() For example, if you want to put a comment inside
+the __might_sleep() function, you just have to include
+<linux/ftrace.h> and call trace_printk() inside __might_sleep()
+
+trace_printk("I'm a comment!\n")
+
+will produce:
+
+ 1)               |             __might_sleep() {
+ 1)               |                /* I'm a comment! */
+ 1)   1.449 us    |             }
+
+
+You might find other useful features for this tracer in the
+following "dynamic ftrace" section such as tracing only specific
+functions or tasks.
+
+dynamic ftrace
+--------------
+
+If CONFIG_DYNAMIC_FTRACE is set, the system will run with
+virtually no overhead when function tracing is disabled. The way
+this works is the mcount function call (placed at the start of
+every kernel function, produced by the -pg switch in gcc),
+starts of pointing to a simple return. (Enabling FTRACE will
+include the -pg switch in the compiling of the kernel.)
+
+At compile time every C file object is run through the
+recordmcount.pl script (located in the scripts directory). This
+script will process the C object using objdump to find all the
+locations in the .text section that call mcount. (Note, only the
+.text section is processed, since processing other sections like
+.init.text may cause races due to those sections being freed).
+
+A new section called "__mcount_loc" is created that holds
+references to all the mcount call sites in the .text section.
+This section is compiled back into the original object. The
+final linker will add all these references into a single table.
+
+On boot up, before SMP is initialized, the dynamic ftrace code
+scans this table and updates all the locations into nops. It
+also records the locations, which are added to the
+available_filter_functions list.  Modules are processed as they
+are loaded and before they are executed.  When a module is
+unloaded, it also removes its functions from the ftrace function
+list. This is automatic in the module unload code, and the
+module author does not need to worry about it.
+
+When tracing is enabled, kstop_machine is called to prevent
+races with the CPUS executing code being modified (which can
+cause the CPU to do undesireable things), and the nops are
+patched back to calls. But this time, they do not call mcount
+(which is just a function stub). They now call into the ftrace
+infrastructure.
+
+One special side-effect to the recording of the functions being
+traced is that we can now selectively choose which functions we
+wish to trace and which ones we want the mcount calls to remain
+as nops.
+
+Two files are used, one for enabling and one for disabling the
+tracing of specified functions. They are:
+
+  set_ftrace_filter
+
+and
+
+  set_ftrace_notrace
+
+A list of available functions that you can add to these files is
+listed in:
+
+   available_filter_functions
+
+ # cat /debug/tracing/available_filter_functions
+put_prev_task_idle
+kmem_cache_create
+pick_next_task_rt
+get_online_cpus
+pick_next_task_fair
+mutex_lock
+[...]
+
+If I am only interested in sys_nanosleep and hrtimer_interrupt:
+
+ # echo sys_nanosleep hrtimer_interrupt \
+		> /debug/tracing/set_ftrace_filter
+ # echo ftrace > /debug/tracing/current_tracer
+ # echo 1 > /debug/tracing/tracing_enabled
+ # usleep 1
+ # echo 0 > /debug/tracing/tracing_enabled
+ # cat /debug/tracing/trace
+# tracer: ftrace
+#
+#           TASK-PID   CPU#    TIMESTAMP  FUNCTION
+#              | |      |          |         |
+          usleep-4134  [00]  1317.070017: hrtimer_interrupt <-smp_apic_timer_interrupt
+          usleep-4134  [00]  1317.070111: sys_nanosleep <-syscall_call
+          <idle>-0     [00]  1317.070115: hrtimer_interrupt <-smp_apic_timer_interrupt
+
+To see which functions are being traced, you can cat the file:
+
+ # cat /debug/tracing/set_ftrace_filter
+hrtimer_interrupt
+sys_nanosleep
+
+
+Perhaps this is not enough. The filters also allow simple wild
+cards. Only the following are currently available
+
+  <match>*  - will match functions that begin with <match>
+  *<match>  - will match functions that end with <match>
+  *<match>* - will match functions that have <match> in it
+
+These are the only wild cards which are supported.
+
+  <match>*<match> will not work.
+
+Note: It is better to use quotes to enclose the wild cards,
+      otherwise the shell may expand the parameters into names
+      of files in the local directory.
+
+ # echo 'hrtimer_*' > /debug/tracing/set_ftrace_filter
+
+Produces:
+
+# tracer: ftrace
+#
+#           TASK-PID   CPU#    TIMESTAMP  FUNCTION
+#              | |      |          |         |
+            bash-4003  [00]  1480.611794: hrtimer_init <-copy_process
+            bash-4003  [00]  1480.611941: hrtimer_start <-hrtick_set
+            bash-4003  [00]  1480.611956: hrtimer_cancel <-hrtick_clear
+            bash-4003  [00]  1480.611956: hrtimer_try_to_cancel <-hrtimer_cancel
+          <idle>-0     [00]  1480.612019: hrtimer_get_next_event <-get_next_timer_interrupt
+          <idle>-0     [00]  1480.612025: hrtimer_get_next_event <-get_next_timer_interrupt
+          <idle>-0     [00]  1480.612032: hrtimer_get_next_event <-get_next_timer_interrupt
+          <idle>-0     [00]  1480.612037: hrtimer_get_next_event <-get_next_timer_interrupt
+          <idle>-0     [00]  1480.612382: hrtimer_get_next_event <-get_next_timer_interrupt
+
+
+Notice that we lost the sys_nanosleep.
+
+ # cat /debug/tracing/set_ftrace_filter
+hrtimer_run_queues
+hrtimer_run_pending
+hrtimer_init
+hrtimer_cancel
+hrtimer_try_to_cancel
+hrtimer_forward
+hrtimer_start
+hrtimer_reprogram
+hrtimer_force_reprogram
+hrtimer_get_next_event
+hrtimer_interrupt
+hrtimer_nanosleep
+hrtimer_wakeup
+hrtimer_get_remaining
+hrtimer_get_res
+hrtimer_init_sleeper
+
+
+This is because the '>' and '>>' act just like they do in bash.
+To rewrite the filters, use '>'
+To append to the filters, use '>>'
+
+To clear out a filter so that all functions will be recorded
+again:
+
+ # echo > /debug/tracing/set_ftrace_filter
+ # cat /debug/tracing/set_ftrace_filter
+ #
+
+Again, now we want to append.
+
+ # echo sys_nanosleep > /debug/tracing/set_ftrace_filter
+ # cat /debug/tracing/set_ftrace_filter
+sys_nanosleep
+ # echo 'hrtimer_*' >> /debug/tracing/set_ftrace_filter
+ # cat /debug/tracing/set_ftrace_filter
+hrtimer_run_queues
+hrtimer_run_pending
+hrtimer_init
+hrtimer_cancel
+hrtimer_try_to_cancel
+hrtimer_forward
+hrtimer_start
+hrtimer_reprogram
+hrtimer_force_reprogram
+hrtimer_get_next_event
+hrtimer_interrupt
+sys_nanosleep
+hrtimer_nanosleep
+hrtimer_wakeup
+hrtimer_get_remaining
+hrtimer_get_res
+hrtimer_init_sleeper
+
+
+The set_ftrace_notrace prevents those functions from being
+traced.
+
+ # echo '*preempt*' '*lock*' > /debug/tracing/set_ftrace_notrace
+
+Produces:
+
+# tracer: ftrace
+#
+#           TASK-PID   CPU#    TIMESTAMP  FUNCTION
+#              | |      |          |         |
+            bash-4043  [01]   115.281644: finish_task_switch <-schedule
+            bash-4043  [01]   115.281645: hrtick_set <-schedule
+            bash-4043  [01]   115.281645: hrtick_clear <-hrtick_set
+            bash-4043  [01]   115.281646: wait_for_completion <-__stop_machine_run
+            bash-4043  [01]   115.281647: wait_for_common <-wait_for_completion
+            bash-4043  [01]   115.281647: kthread_stop <-stop_machine_run
+            bash-4043  [01]   115.281648: init_waitqueue_head <-kthread_stop
+            bash-4043  [01]   115.281648: wake_up_process <-kthread_stop
+            bash-4043  [01]   115.281649: try_to_wake_up <-wake_up_process
+
+We can see that there's no more lock or preempt tracing.
+
+
+Dynamic ftrace with the function graph tracer
+---------------------------------------------
+
+Although what has been explained above concerns both the
+function tracer and the function-graph-tracer, there are some
+special features only available in the function-graph tracer.
+
+If you want to trace only one function and all of its children,
+you just have to echo its name into set_graph_function:
+
+ echo __do_fault > set_graph_function
+
+will produce the following "expanded" trace of the __do_fault()
+function:
+
+ 0)               |  __do_fault() {
+ 0)               |    filemap_fault() {
+ 0)               |      find_lock_page() {
+ 0)   0.804 us    |        find_get_page();
+ 0)               |        __might_sleep() {
+ 0)   1.329 us    |        }
+ 0)   3.904 us    |      }
+ 0)   4.979 us    |    }
+ 0)   0.653 us    |    _spin_lock();
+ 0)   0.578 us    |    page_add_file_rmap();
+ 0)   0.525 us    |    native_set_pte_at();
+ 0)   0.585 us    |    _spin_unlock();
+ 0)               |    unlock_page() {
+ 0)   0.541 us    |      page_waitqueue();
+ 0)   0.639 us    |      __wake_up_bit();
+ 0)   2.786 us    |    }
+ 0) + 14.237 us   |  }
+ 0)               |  __do_fault() {
+ 0)               |    filemap_fault() {
+ 0)               |      find_lock_page() {
+ 0)   0.698 us    |        find_get_page();
+ 0)               |        __might_sleep() {
+ 0)   1.412 us    |        }
+ 0)   3.950 us    |      }
+ 0)   5.098 us    |    }
+ 0)   0.631 us    |    _spin_lock();
+ 0)   0.571 us    |    page_add_file_rmap();
+ 0)   0.526 us    |    native_set_pte_at();
+ 0)   0.586 us    |    _spin_unlock();
+ 0)               |    unlock_page() {
+ 0)   0.533 us    |      page_waitqueue();
+ 0)   0.638 us    |      __wake_up_bit();
+ 0)   2.793 us    |    }
+ 0) + 14.012 us   |  }
+
+You can also expand several functions at once:
+
+ echo sys_open > set_graph_function
+ echo sys_close >> set_graph_function
+
+Now if you want to go back to trace all functions you can clear
+this special filter via:
+
+ echo > set_graph_function
+
+
+trace_pipe
+----------
+
+The trace_pipe outputs the same content as the trace file, but
+the effect on the tracing is different. Every read from
+trace_pipe is consumed. This means that subsequent reads will be
+different. The trace is live.
+
+ # echo function > /debug/tracing/current_tracer
+ # cat /debug/tracing/trace_pipe > /tmp/trace.out &
+[1] 4153
+ # echo 1 > /debug/tracing/tracing_enabled
+ # usleep 1
+ # echo 0 > /debug/tracing/tracing_enabled
+ # cat /debug/tracing/trace
+# tracer: function
+#
+#           TASK-PID   CPU#    TIMESTAMP  FUNCTION
+#              | |      |          |         |
+
+ #
+ # cat /tmp/trace.out
+            bash-4043  [00] 41.267106: finish_task_switch <-schedule
+            bash-4043  [00] 41.267106: hrtick_set <-schedule
+            bash-4043  [00] 41.267107: hrtick_clear <-hrtick_set
+            bash-4043  [00] 41.267108: wait_for_completion <-__stop_machine_run
+            bash-4043  [00] 41.267108: wait_for_common <-wait_for_completion
+            bash-4043  [00] 41.267109: kthread_stop <-stop_machine_run
+            bash-4043  [00] 41.267109: init_waitqueue_head <-kthread_stop
+            bash-4043  [00] 41.267110: wake_up_process <-kthread_stop
+            bash-4043  [00] 41.267110: try_to_wake_up <-wake_up_process
+            bash-4043  [00] 41.267111: select_task_rq_rt <-try_to_wake_up
+
+
+Note, reading the trace_pipe file will block until more input is
+added. By changing the tracer, trace_pipe will issue an EOF. We
+needed to set the function tracer _before_ we "cat" the
+trace_pipe file.
+
+
+trace entries
+-------------
+
+Having too much or not enough data can be troublesome in
+diagnosing an issue in the kernel. The file buffer_size_kb is
+used to modify the size of the internal trace buffers. The
+number listed is the number of entries that can be recorded per
+CPU. To know the full size, multiply the number of possible CPUS
+with the number of entries.
+
+ # cat /debug/tracing/buffer_size_kb
+1408 (units kilobytes)
+
+Note, to modify this, you must have tracing completely disabled.
+To do that, echo "nop" into the current_tracer. If the
+current_tracer is not set to "nop", an EINVAL error will be
+returned.
+
+ # echo nop > /debug/tracing/current_tracer
+ # echo 10000 > /debug/tracing/buffer_size_kb
+ # cat /debug/tracing/buffer_size_kb
+10000 (units kilobytes)
+
+The number of pages which will be allocated is limited to a
+percentage of available memory. Allocating too much will produce
+an error.
+
+ # echo 1000000000000 > /debug/tracing/buffer_size_kb
+-bash: echo: write error: Cannot allocate memory
+ # cat /debug/tracing/buffer_size_kb
+85
+
+-----------
+
+More details can be found in the source code, in the
+kernel/tracing/*.c files.
diff --git a/Documentation/trace/kmemtrace.txt b/Documentation/trace/kmemtrace.txt
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..a956d9b
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/trace/kmemtrace.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,126 @@
+			kmemtrace - Kernel Memory Tracer
+
+			  by Eduard - Gabriel Munteanu
+			     <eduard.munteanu@linux360.ro>
+
+I. Introduction
+===============
+
+kmemtrace helps kernel developers figure out two things:
+1) how different allocators (SLAB, SLUB etc.) perform
+2) how kernel code allocates memory and how much
+
+To do this, we trace every allocation and export information to the userspace
+through the relay interface. We export things such as the number of requested
+bytes, the number of bytes actually allocated (i.e. including internal
+fragmentation), whether this is a slab allocation or a plain kmalloc() and so
+on.
+
+The actual analysis is performed by a userspace tool (see section III for
+details on where to get it from). It logs the data exported by the kernel,
+processes it and (as of writing this) can provide the following information:
+- the total amount of memory allocated and fragmentation per call-site
+- the amount of memory allocated and fragmentation per allocation
+- total memory allocated and fragmentation in the collected dataset
+- number of cross-CPU allocation and frees (makes sense in NUMA environments)
+
+Moreover, it can potentially find inconsistent and erroneous behavior in
+kernel code, such as using slab free functions on kmalloc'ed memory or
+allocating less memory than requested (but not truly failed allocations).
+
+kmemtrace also makes provisions for tracing on some arch and analysing the
+data on another.
+
+II. Design and goals
+====================
+
+kmemtrace was designed to handle rather large amounts of data. Thus, it uses
+the relay interface to export whatever is logged to userspace, which then
+stores it. Analysis and reporting is done asynchronously, that is, after the
+data is collected and stored. By design, it allows one to log and analyse
+on different machines and different arches.
+
+As of writing this, the ABI is not considered stable, though it might not
+change much. However, no guarantees are made about compatibility yet. When
+deemed stable, the ABI should still allow easy extension while maintaining
+backward compatibility. This is described further in Documentation/ABI.
+
+Summary of design goals:
+	- allow logging and analysis to be done across different machines
+	- be fast and anticipate usage in high-load environments (*)
+	- be reasonably extensible
+	- make it possible for GNU/Linux distributions to have kmemtrace
+	included in their repositories
+
+(*) - one of the reasons Pekka Enberg's original userspace data analysis
+    tool's code was rewritten from Perl to C (although this is more than a
+    simple conversion)
+
+
+III. Quick usage guide
+======================
+
+1) Get a kernel that supports kmemtrace and build it accordingly (i.e. enable
+CONFIG_KMEMTRACE).
+
+2) Get the userspace tool and build it:
+$ git-clone git://repo.or.cz/kmemtrace-user.git		# current repository
+$ cd kmemtrace-user/
+$ ./autogen.sh
+$ ./configure
+$ make
+
+3) Boot the kmemtrace-enabled kernel if you haven't, preferably in the
+'single' runlevel (so that relay buffers don't fill up easily), and run
+kmemtrace:
+# '$' does not mean user, but root here.
+$ mount -t debugfs none /sys/kernel/debug
+$ mount -t proc none /proc
+$ cd path/to/kmemtrace-user/
+$ ./kmemtraced
+Wait a bit, then stop it with CTRL+C.
+$ cat /sys/kernel/debug/kmemtrace/total_overruns	# Check if we didn't
+							# overrun, should
+							# be zero.
+$ (Optionally) [Run kmemtrace_check separately on each cpu[0-9]*.out file to
+		check its correctness]
+$ ./kmemtrace-report
+
+Now you should have a nice and short summary of how the allocator performs.
+
+IV. FAQ and known issues
+========================
+
+Q: 'cat /sys/kernel/debug/kmemtrace/total_overruns' is non-zero, how do I fix
+this? Should I worry?
+A: If it's non-zero, this affects kmemtrace's accuracy, depending on how
+large the number is. You can fix it by supplying a higher
+'kmemtrace.subbufs=N' kernel parameter.
+---
+
+Q: kmemtrace_check reports errors, how do I fix this? Should I worry?
+A: This is a bug and should be reported. It can occur for a variety of
+reasons:
+	- possible bugs in relay code
+	- possible misuse of relay by kmemtrace
+	- timestamps being collected unorderly
+Or you may fix it yourself and send us a patch.
+---
+
+Q: kmemtrace_report shows many errors, how do I fix this? Should I worry?
+A: This is a known issue and I'm working on it. These might be true errors
+in kernel code, which may have inconsistent behavior (e.g. allocating memory
+with kmem_cache_alloc() and freeing it with kfree()). Pekka Enberg pointed
+out this behavior may work with SLAB, but may fail with other allocators.
+
+It may also be due to lack of tracing in some unusual allocator functions.
+
+We don't want bug reports regarding this issue yet.
+---
+
+V. See also
+===========
+
+Documentation/kernel-parameters.txt
+Documentation/ABI/testing/debugfs-kmemtrace
+
diff --git a/Documentation/tracers/mmiotrace.txt b/Documentation/trace/mmiotrace.txt
similarity index 100%
rename from Documentation/tracers/mmiotrace.txt
rename to Documentation/trace/mmiotrace.txt
diff --git a/Documentation/trace/tracepoints.txt b/Documentation/trace/tracepoints.txt
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..c0e1cee
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/trace/tracepoints.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,116 @@
+	             Using the Linux Kernel Tracepoints
+
+			    Mathieu Desnoyers
+
+
+This document introduces Linux Kernel Tracepoints and their use. It
+provides examples of how to insert tracepoints in the kernel and
+connect probe functions to them and provides some examples of probe
+functions.
+
+
+* Purpose of tracepoints
+
+A tracepoint placed in code provides a hook to call a function (probe)
+that you can provide at runtime. A tracepoint can be "on" (a probe is
+connected to it) or "off" (no probe is attached). When a tracepoint is
+"off" it has no effect, except for adding a tiny time penalty
+(checking a condition for a branch) and space penalty (adding a few
+bytes for the function call at the end of the instrumented function
+and adds a data structure in a separate section).  When a tracepoint
+is "on", the function you provide is called each time the tracepoint
+is executed, in the execution context of the caller. When the function
+provided ends its execution, it returns to the caller (continuing from
+the tracepoint site).
+
+You can put tracepoints at important locations in the code. They are
+lightweight hooks that can pass an arbitrary number of parameters,
+which prototypes are described in a tracepoint declaration placed in a
+header file.
+
+They can be used for tracing and performance accounting.
+
+
+* Usage
+
+Two elements are required for tracepoints :
+
+- A tracepoint definition, placed in a header file.
+- The tracepoint statement, in C code.
+
+In order to use tracepoints, you should include linux/tracepoint.h.
+
+In include/trace/subsys.h :
+
+#include <linux/tracepoint.h>
+
+DECLARE_TRACE(subsys_eventname,
+	TP_PROTO(int firstarg, struct task_struct *p),
+	TP_ARGS(firstarg, p));
+
+In subsys/file.c (where the tracing statement must be added) :
+
+#include <trace/subsys.h>
+
+DEFINE_TRACE(subsys_eventname);
+
+void somefct(void)
+{
+	...
+	trace_subsys_eventname(arg, task);
+	...
+}
+
+Where :
+- subsys_eventname is an identifier unique to your event
+    - subsys is the name of your subsystem.
+    - eventname is the name of the event to trace.
+
+- TP_PROTO(int firstarg, struct task_struct *p) is the prototype of the
+  function called by this tracepoint.
+
+- TP_ARGS(firstarg, p) are the parameters names, same as found in the
+  prototype.
+
+Connecting a function (probe) to a tracepoint is done by providing a
+probe (function to call) for the specific tracepoint through
+register_trace_subsys_eventname().  Removing a probe is done through
+unregister_trace_subsys_eventname(); it will remove the probe.
+
+tracepoint_synchronize_unregister() must be called before the end of
+the module exit function to make sure there is no caller left using
+the probe. This, and the fact that preemption is disabled around the
+probe call, make sure that probe removal and module unload are safe.
+See the "Probe example" section below for a sample probe module.
+
+The tracepoint mechanism supports inserting multiple instances of the
+same tracepoint, but a single definition must be made of a given
+tracepoint name over all the kernel to make sure no type conflict will
+occur. Name mangling of the tracepoints is done using the prototypes
+to make sure typing is correct. Verification of probe type correctness
+is done at the registration site by the compiler. Tracepoints can be
+put in inline functions, inlined static functions, and unrolled loops
+as well as regular functions.
+
+The naming scheme "subsys_event" is suggested here as a convention
+intended to limit collisions. Tracepoint names are global to the
+kernel: they are considered as being the same whether they are in the
+core kernel image or in modules.
+
+If the tracepoint has to be used in kernel modules, an
+EXPORT_TRACEPOINT_SYMBOL_GPL() or EXPORT_TRACEPOINT_SYMBOL() can be
+used to export the defined tracepoints.
+
+* Probe / tracepoint example
+
+See the example provided in samples/tracepoints
+
+Compile them with your kernel.  They are built during 'make' (not
+'make modules') when CONFIG_SAMPLE_TRACEPOINTS=m.
+
+Run, as root :
+modprobe tracepoint-sample (insmod order is not important)
+modprobe tracepoint-probe-sample
+cat /proc/tracepoint-sample (returns an expected error)
+rmmod tracepoint-sample tracepoint-probe-sample
+dmesg
diff --git a/Documentation/tracepoints.txt b/Documentation/tracepoints.txt
deleted file mode 100644
index 6f0a044..0000000
--- a/Documentation/tracepoints.txt
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,115 +0,0 @@
-	             Using the Linux Kernel Tracepoints
-
-			    Mathieu Desnoyers
-
-
-This document introduces Linux Kernel Tracepoints and their use. It
-provides examples of how to insert tracepoints in the kernel and
-connect probe functions to them and provides some examples of probe
-functions.
-
-
-* Purpose of tracepoints
-
-A tracepoint placed in code provides a hook to call a function (probe)
-that you can provide at runtime. A tracepoint can be "on" (a probe is
-connected to it) or "off" (no probe is attached). When a tracepoint is
-"off" it has no effect, except for adding a tiny time penalty
-(checking a condition for a branch) and space penalty (adding a few
-bytes for the function call at the end of the instrumented function
-and adds a data structure in a separate section).  When a tracepoint
-is "on", the function you provide is called each time the tracepoint
-is executed, in the execution context of the caller. When the function
-provided ends its execution, it returns to the caller (continuing from
-the tracepoint site).
-
-You can put tracepoints at important locations in the code. They are
-lightweight hooks that can pass an arbitrary number of parameters,
-which prototypes are described in a tracepoint declaration placed in a
-header file.
-
-They can be used for tracing and performance accounting.
-
-
-* Usage
-
-Two elements are required for tracepoints :
-
-- A tracepoint definition, placed in a header file.
-- The tracepoint statement, in C code.
-
-In order to use tracepoints, you should include linux/tracepoint.h.
-
-In include/trace/subsys.h :
-
-#include <linux/tracepoint.h>
-
-DECLARE_TRACE(subsys_eventname,
-	TPPROTO(int firstarg, struct task_struct *p),
-	TPARGS(firstarg, p));
-
-In subsys/file.c (where the tracing statement must be added) :
-
-#include <trace/subsys.h>
-
-DEFINE_TRACE(subsys_eventname);
-
-void somefct(void)
-{
-	...
-	trace_subsys_eventname(arg, task);
-	...
-}
-
-Where :
-- subsys_eventname is an identifier unique to your event
-    - subsys is the name of your subsystem.
-    - eventname is the name of the event to trace.
-
-- TPPROTO(int firstarg, struct task_struct *p) is the prototype of the
-  function called by this tracepoint.
-
-- TPARGS(firstarg, p) are the parameters names, same as found in the
-  prototype.
-
-Connecting a function (probe) to a tracepoint is done by providing a
-probe (function to call) for the specific tracepoint through
-register_trace_subsys_eventname().  Removing a probe is done through
-unregister_trace_subsys_eventname(); it will remove the probe.
-
-tracepoint_synchronize_unregister() must be called before the end of
-the module exit function to make sure there is no caller left using
-the probe. This, and the fact that preemption is disabled around the
-probe call, make sure that probe removal and module unload are safe.
-See the "Probe example" section below for a sample probe module.
-
-The tracepoint mechanism supports inserting multiple instances of the
-same tracepoint, but a single definition must be made of a given
-tracepoint name over all the kernel to make sure no type conflict will
-occur. Name mangling of the tracepoints is done using the prototypes
-to make sure typing is correct. Verification of probe type correctness
-is done at the registration site by the compiler. Tracepoints can be
-put in inline functions, inlined static functions, and unrolled loops
-as well as regular functions.
-
-The naming scheme "subsys_event" is suggested here as a convention
-intended to limit collisions. Tracepoint names are global to the
-kernel: they are considered as being the same whether they are in the
-core kernel image or in modules.
-
-If the tracepoint has to be used in kernel modules, an
-EXPORT_TRACEPOINT_SYMBOL_GPL() or EXPORT_TRACEPOINT_SYMBOL() can be
-used to export the defined tracepoints.
-
-* Probe / tracepoint example
-
-See the example provided in samples/tracepoints/src
-
-Compile them with your kernel.
-
-Run, as root :
-modprobe tracepoint-example (insmod order is not important)
-modprobe tracepoint-probe-example
-cat /proc/tracepoint-example (returns an expected error)
-rmmod tracepoint-example tracepoint-probe-example
-dmesg
diff --git a/Documentation/video4linux/pxa_camera.txt b/Documentation/video4linux/pxa_camera.txt
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..b1137f9
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/video4linux/pxa_camera.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,125 @@
+                              PXA-Camera Host Driver
+                              ======================
+
+Constraints
+-----------
+  a) Image size for YUV422P format
+     All YUV422P images are enforced to have width x height % 16 = 0.
+     This is due to DMA constraints, which transfers only planes of 8 byte
+     multiples.
+
+
+Global video workflow
+---------------------
+  a) QCI stopped
+     Initialy, the QCI interface is stopped.
+     When a buffer is queued (pxa_videobuf_ops->buf_queue), the QCI starts.
+
+  b) QCI started
+     More buffers can be queued while the QCI is started without halting the
+     capture.  The new buffers are "appended" at the tail of the DMA chain, and
+     smoothly captured one frame after the other.
+
+     Once a buffer is filled in the QCI interface, it is marked as "DONE" and
+     removed from the active buffers list. It can be then requeud or dequeued by
+     userland application.
+
+     Once the last buffer is filled in, the QCI interface stops.
+
+
+DMA usage
+---------
+  a) DMA flow
+     - first buffer queued for capture
+       Once a first buffer is queued for capture, the QCI is started, but data
+       transfer is not started. On "End Of Frame" interrupt, the irq handler
+       starts the DMA chain.
+     - capture of one videobuffer
+       The DMA chain starts transfering data into videobuffer RAM pages.
+       When all pages are transfered, the DMA irq is raised on "ENDINTR" status
+     - finishing one videobuffer
+       The DMA irq handler marks the videobuffer as "done", and removes it from
+       the active running queue
+       Meanwhile, the next videobuffer (if there is one), is transfered by DMA
+     - finishing the last videobuffer
+       On the DMA irq of the last videobuffer, the QCI is stopped.
+
+  b) DMA prepared buffer will have this structure
+
+     +------------+-----+---------------+-----------------+
+     | desc-sg[0] | ... | desc-sg[last] | finisher/linker |
+     +------------+-----+---------------+-----------------+
+
+     This structure is pointed by dma->sg_cpu.
+     The descriptors are used as follows :
+      - desc-sg[i]: i-th descriptor, transfering the i-th sg
+        element to the video buffer scatter gather
+      - finisher: has ddadr=DADDR_STOP, dcmd=ENDIRQEN
+      - linker: has ddadr= desc-sg[0] of next video buffer, dcmd=0
+
+     For the next schema, let's assume d0=desc-sg[0] .. dN=desc-sg[N],
+     "f" stands for finisher and "l" for linker.
+     A typical running chain is :
+
+         Videobuffer 1         Videobuffer 2
+     +---------+----+---+  +----+----+----+---+
+     | d0 | .. | dN | l |  | d0 | .. | dN | f |
+     +---------+----+-|-+  ^----+----+----+---+
+                      |    |
+                      +----+
+
+     After the chaining is finished, the chain looks like :
+
+         Videobuffer 1         Videobuffer 2         Videobuffer 3
+     +---------+----+---+  +----+----+----+---+  +----+----+----+---+
+     | d0 | .. | dN | l |  | d0 | .. | dN | l |  | d0 | .. | dN | f |
+     +---------+----+-|-+  ^----+----+----+-|-+  ^----+----+----+---+
+                      |    |                |    |
+                      +----+                +----+
+                                           new_link
+
+  c) DMA hot chaining timeslice issue
+
+     As DMA chaining is done while DMA _is_ running, the linking may be done
+     while the DMA jumps from one Videobuffer to another. On the schema, that
+     would be a problem if the following sequence is encountered :
+
+      - DMA chain is Videobuffer1 + Videobuffer2
+      - pxa_videobuf_queue() is called to queue Videobuffer3
+      - DMA controller finishes Videobuffer2, and DMA stops
+      =>
+         Videobuffer 1         Videobuffer 2
+     +---------+----+---+  +----+----+----+---+
+     | d0 | .. | dN | l |  | d0 | .. | dN | f |
+     +---------+----+-|-+  ^----+----+----+-^-+
+                      |    |                |
+                      +----+                +-- DMA DDADR loads DDADR_STOP
+
+      - pxa_dma_add_tail_buf() is called, the Videobuffer2 "finisher" is
+        replaced by a "linker" to Videobuffer3 (creation of new_link)
+      - pxa_videobuf_queue() finishes
+      - the DMA irq handler is called, which terminates Videobuffer2
+      - Videobuffer3 capture is not scheduled on DMA chain (as it stopped !!!)
+
+         Videobuffer 1         Videobuffer 2         Videobuffer 3
+     +---------+----+---+  +----+----+----+---+  +----+----+----+---+
+     | d0 | .. | dN | l |  | d0 | .. | dN | l |  | d0 | .. | dN | f |
+     +---------+----+-|-+  ^----+----+----+-|-+  ^----+----+----+---+
+                      |    |                |    |
+                      +----+                +----+
+                                           new_link
+                                          DMA DDADR still is DDADR_STOP
+
+      - pxa_camera_check_link_miss() is called
+        This checks if the DMA is finished and a buffer is still on the
+        pcdev->capture list. If that's the case, the capture will be restarted,
+        and Videobuffer3 is scheduled on DMA chain.
+      - the DMA irq handler finishes
+
+     Note: if DMA stops just after pxa_camera_check_link_miss() reads DDADR()
+     value, we have the guarantee that the DMA irq handler will be called back
+     when the DMA will finish the buffer, and pxa_camera_check_link_miss() will
+     be called again, to reschedule Videobuffer3.
+
+--
+Author: Robert Jarzmik <robert.jarzmik@free.fr>
diff --git a/Documentation/video4linux/v4l2-framework.txt b/Documentation/video4linux/v4l2-framework.txt
index a311773..854808b 100644
--- a/Documentation/video4linux/v4l2-framework.txt
+++ b/Documentation/video4linux/v4l2-framework.txt
@@ -90,7 +90,7 @@
 NULL, then you *must* setup v4l2_dev->name before calling v4l2_device_register.
 
 The first 'dev' argument is normally the struct device pointer of a pci_dev,
-usb_device or platform_device. It is rare for dev to be NULL, but it happens
+usb_interface or platform_device. It is rare for dev to be NULL, but it happens
 with ISA devices or when one device creates multiple PCI devices, thus making
 it impossible to associate v4l2_dev with a particular parent.
 
@@ -351,17 +351,6 @@
 
 	struct v4l2_subdev *sd = i2c_get_clientdata(client);
 
-Finally you need to make a command function to make driver->command()
-call the right subdev_ops functions:
-
-static int subdev_command(struct i2c_client *client, unsigned cmd, void *arg)
-{
-	return v4l2_subdev_command(i2c_get_clientdata(client), cmd, arg);
-}
-
-If driver->command is never used then you can leave this out. Eventually the
-driver->command usage should be removed from v4l.
-
 Make sure to call v4l2_device_unregister_subdev(sd) when the remove() callback
 is called. This will unregister the sub-device from the bridge driver. It is
 safe to call this even if the sub-device was never registered.
@@ -375,14 +364,12 @@
 
 The bridge driver also has some helper functions it can use:
 
-struct v4l2_subdev *sd = v4l2_i2c_new_subdev(adapter, "module_foo", "chipid", 0x36);
+struct v4l2_subdev *sd = v4l2_i2c_new_subdev(v4l2_dev, adapter,
+	       "module_foo", "chipid", 0x36);
 
 This loads the given module (can be NULL if no module needs to be loaded) and
 calls i2c_new_device() with the given i2c_adapter and chip/address arguments.
-If all goes well, then it registers the subdev with the v4l2_device. It gets
-the v4l2_device by calling i2c_get_adapdata(adapter), so you should make sure
-to call i2c_set_adapdata(adapter, v4l2_device) when you setup the i2c_adapter
-in your driver.
+If all goes well, then it registers the subdev with the v4l2_device.
 
 You can also use v4l2_i2c_new_probed_subdev() which is very similar to
 v4l2_i2c_new_subdev(), except that it has an array of possible I2C addresses
diff --git a/Documentation/vm/00-INDEX b/Documentation/vm/00-INDEX
index 2131b00..2f77ced 100644
--- a/Documentation/vm/00-INDEX
+++ b/Documentation/vm/00-INDEX
@@ -1,5 +1,7 @@
 00-INDEX
 	- this file.
+active_mm.txt
+	- An explanation from Linus about tsk->active_mm vs tsk->mm.
 balance
 	- various information on memory balancing.
 hugetlbpage.txt
diff --git a/Documentation/vm/active_mm.txt b/Documentation/vm/active_mm.txt
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..4ee1f64
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/vm/active_mm.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,83 @@
+List:       linux-kernel
+Subject:    Re: active_mm
+From:       Linus Torvalds <torvalds () transmeta ! com>
+Date:       1999-07-30 21:36:24
+
+Cc'd to linux-kernel, because I don't write explanations all that often,
+and when I do I feel better about more people reading them.
+
+On Fri, 30 Jul 1999, David Mosberger wrote:
+>
+> Is there a brief description someplace on how "mm" vs. "active_mm" in
+> the task_struct are supposed to be used?  (My apologies if this was
+> discussed on the mailing lists---I just returned from vacation and
+> wasn't able to follow linux-kernel for a while).
+
+Basically, the new setup is:
+
+ - we have "real address spaces" and "anonymous address spaces". The
+   difference is that an anonymous address space doesn't care about the
+   user-level page tables at all, so when we do a context switch into an
+   anonymous address space we just leave the previous address space
+   active.
+
+   The obvious use for a "anonymous address space" is any thread that
+   doesn't need any user mappings - all kernel threads basically fall into
+   this category, but even "real" threads can temporarily say that for
+   some amount of time they are not going to be interested in user space,
+   and that the scheduler might as well try to avoid wasting time on
+   switching the VM state around. Currently only the old-style bdflush
+   sync does that.
+
+ - "tsk->mm" points to the "real address space". For an anonymous process,
+   tsk->mm will be NULL, for the logical reason that an anonymous process
+   really doesn't _have_ a real address space at all.
+
+ - however, we obviously need to keep track of which address space we
+   "stole" for such an anonymous user. For that, we have "tsk->active_mm",
+   which shows what the currently active address space is.
+
+   The rule is that for a process with a real address space (ie tsk->mm is
+   non-NULL) the active_mm obviously always has to be the same as the real
+   one.
+
+   For a anonymous process, tsk->mm == NULL, and tsk->active_mm is the
+   "borrowed" mm while the anonymous process is running. When the
+   anonymous process gets scheduled away, the borrowed address space is
+   returned and cleared.
+
+To support all that, the "struct mm_struct" now has two counters: a
+"mm_users" counter that is how many "real address space users" there are,
+and a "mm_count" counter that is the number of "lazy" users (ie anonymous
+users) plus one if there are any real users.
+
+Usually there is at least one real user, but it could be that the real
+user exited on another CPU while a lazy user was still active, so you do
+actually get cases where you have a address space that is _only_ used by
+lazy users. That is often a short-lived state, because once that thread
+gets scheduled away in favour of a real thread, the "zombie" mm gets
+released because "mm_users" becomes zero.
+
+Also, a new rule is that _nobody_ ever has "init_mm" as a real MM any
+more. "init_mm" should be considered just a "lazy context when no other
+context is available", and in fact it is mainly used just at bootup when
+no real VM has yet been created. So code that used to check
+
+	if (current->mm == &init_mm)
+
+should generally just do
+
+	if (!current->mm)
+
+instead (which makes more sense anyway - the test is basically one of "do
+we have a user context", and is generally done by the page fault handler
+and things like that).
+
+Anyway, I put a pre-patch-2.3.13-1 on ftp.kernel.org just a moment ago,
+because it slightly changes the interfaces to accomodate the alpha (who
+would have thought it, but the alpha actually ends up having one of the
+ugliest context switch codes - unlike the other architectures where the MM
+and register state is separate, the alpha PALcode joins the two, and you
+need to switch both together).
+
+(From http://marc.info/?l=linux-kernel&m=93337278602211&w=2)
diff --git a/Documentation/vm/numa_memory_policy.txt b/Documentation/vm/numa_memory_policy.txt
index 6aaaeb3..be45dbb 100644
--- a/Documentation/vm/numa_memory_policy.txt
+++ b/Documentation/vm/numa_memory_policy.txt
@@ -8,7 +8,8 @@
 document attempts to describe the concepts and APIs of the 2.6 memory policy
 support.
 
-Memory policies should not be confused with cpusets (Documentation/cpusets.txt)
+Memory policies should not be confused with cpusets
+(Documentation/cgroups/cpusets.txt)
 which is an administrative mechanism for restricting the nodes from which
 memory may be allocated by a set of processes. Memory policies are a
 programming interface that a NUMA-aware application can take advantage of.  When
diff --git a/Documentation/vm/page_migration b/Documentation/vm/page_migration
index d5fdfd3..6513fe2 100644
--- a/Documentation/vm/page_migration
+++ b/Documentation/vm/page_migration
@@ -37,7 +37,8 @@
 
 Larger installations usually partition the system using cpusets into
 sections of nodes. Paul Jackson has equipped cpusets with the ability to
-move pages when a task is moved to another cpuset (See ../cpusets.txt).
+move pages when a task is moved to another cpuset (See
+Documentation/cgroups/cpusets.txt).
 Cpusets allows the automation of process locality. If a task is moved to
 a new cpuset then also all its pages are moved with it so that the
 performance of the process does not sink dramatically. Also the pages
diff --git a/Documentation/vm/unevictable-lru.txt b/Documentation/vm/unevictable-lru.txt
index 0706a72..2d70d0d 100644
--- a/Documentation/vm/unevictable-lru.txt
+++ b/Documentation/vm/unevictable-lru.txt
@@ -1,588 +1,691 @@
+			==============================
+			UNEVICTABLE LRU INFRASTRUCTURE
+			==============================
 
-This document describes the Linux memory management "Unevictable LRU"
-infrastructure and the use of this infrastructure to manage several types
-of "unevictable" pages.  The document attempts to provide the overall
-rationale behind this mechanism and the rationale for some of the design
-decisions that drove the implementation.  The latter design rationale is
-discussed in the context of an implementation description.  Admittedly, one
-can obtain the implementation details--the "what does it do?"--by reading the
-code.  One hopes that the descriptions below add value by provide the answer
-to "why does it do that?".
+========
+CONTENTS
+========
 
-Unevictable LRU Infrastructure:
+ (*) The Unevictable LRU
 
-The Unevictable LRU adds an additional LRU list to track unevictable pages
-and to hide these pages from vmscan.  This mechanism is based on a patch by
-Larry Woodman of Red Hat to address several scalability problems with page
+     - The unevictable page list.
+     - Memory control group interaction.
+     - Marking address spaces unevictable.
+     - Detecting Unevictable Pages.
+     - vmscan's handling of unevictable pages.
+
+ (*) mlock()'d pages.
+
+     - History.
+     - Basic management.
+     - mlock()/mlockall() system call handling.
+     - Filtering special vmas.
+     - munlock()/munlockall() system call handling.
+     - Migrating mlocked pages.
+     - mmap(MAP_LOCKED) system call handling.
+     - munmap()/exit()/exec() system call handling.
+     - try_to_unmap().
+     - try_to_munlock() reverse map scan.
+     - Page reclaim in shrink_*_list().
+
+
+============
+INTRODUCTION
+============
+
+This document describes the Linux memory manager's "Unevictable LRU"
+infrastructure and the use of this to manage several types of "unevictable"
+pages.
+
+The document attempts to provide the overall rationale behind this mechanism
+and the rationale for some of the design decisions that drove the
+implementation.  The latter design rationale is discussed in the context of an
+implementation description.  Admittedly, one can obtain the implementation
+details - the "what does it do?" - by reading the code.  One hopes that the
+descriptions below add value by provide the answer to "why does it do that?".
+
+
+===================
+THE UNEVICTABLE LRU
+===================
+
+The Unevictable LRU facility adds an additional LRU list to track unevictable
+pages and to hide these pages from vmscan.  This mechanism is based on a patch
+by Larry Woodman of Red Hat to address several scalability problems with page
 reclaim in Linux.  The problems have been observed at customer sites on large
-memory x86_64 systems.  For example, a non-numal x86_64 platform with 128GB
-of main memory will have over 32 million 4k pages in a single zone.  When a
-large fraction of these pages are not evictable for any reason [see below],
-vmscan will spend a lot of time scanning the LRU lists looking for the small
-fraction of pages that are evictable.  This can result in a situation where
-all cpus are spending 100% of their time in vmscan for hours or days on end,
-with the system completely unresponsive.
+memory x86_64 systems.
 
-The Unevictable LRU infrastructure addresses the following classes of
-unevictable pages:
+To illustrate this with an example, a non-NUMA x86_64 platform with 128GB of
+main memory will have over 32 million 4k pages in a single zone.  When a large
+fraction of these pages are not evictable for any reason [see below], vmscan
+will spend a lot of time scanning the LRU lists looking for the small fraction
+of pages that are evictable.  This can result in a situation where all CPUs are
+spending 100% of their time in vmscan for hours or days on end, with the system
+completely unresponsive.
 
-+ page owned by ramfs
-+ page mapped into SHM_LOCKed shared memory regions
-+ page mapped into VM_LOCKED [mlock()ed] vmas
+The unevictable list addresses the following classes of unevictable pages:
 
-The infrastructure might be able to handle other conditions that make pages
+ (*) Those owned by ramfs.
+
+ (*) Those mapped into SHM_LOCK'd shared memory regions.
+
+ (*) Those mapped into VM_LOCKED [mlock()ed] VMAs.
+
+The infrastructure may also be able to handle other conditions that make pages
 unevictable, either by definition or by circumstance, in the future.
 
 
-The Unevictable LRU List
+THE UNEVICTABLE PAGE LIST
+-------------------------
 
 The Unevictable LRU infrastructure consists of an additional, per-zone, LRU list
 called the "unevictable" list and an associated page flag, PG_unevictable, to
-indicate that the page is being managed on the unevictable list.  The
-PG_unevictable flag is analogous to, and mutually exclusive with, the PG_active
-flag in that it indicates on which LRU list a page resides when PG_lru is set.
-The unevictable LRU list is source configurable based on the UNEVICTABLE_LRU
-Kconfig option.
+indicate that the page is being managed on the unevictable list.
+
+The PG_unevictable flag is analogous to, and mutually exclusive with, the
+PG_active flag in that it indicates on which LRU list a page resides when
+PG_lru is set.  The unevictable list is compile-time configurable based on the
+UNEVICTABLE_LRU Kconfig option.
 
 The Unevictable LRU infrastructure maintains unevictable pages on an additional
 LRU list for a few reasons:
 
-1) We get to "treat unevictable pages just like we treat other pages in the
-   system, which means we get to use the same code to manipulate them, the
-   same code to isolate them (for migrate, etc.), the same code to keep track
-   of the statistics, etc..." [Rik van Riel]
+ (1) We get to "treat unevictable pages just like we treat other pages in the
+     system - which means we get to use the same code to manipulate them, the
+     same code to isolate them (for migrate, etc.), the same code to keep track
+     of the statistics, etc..." [Rik van Riel]
 
-2) We want to be able to migrate unevictable pages between nodes--for memory
-   defragmentation, workload management and memory hotplug.  The linux kernel
-   can only migrate pages that it can successfully isolate from the lru lists.
-   If we were to maintain pages elsewise than on an lru-like list, where they
-   can be found by isolate_lru_page(), we would prevent their migration, unless
-   we reworked migration code to find the unevictable pages.
+ (2) We want to be able to migrate unevictable pages between nodes for memory
+     defragmentation, workload management and memory hotplug.  The linux kernel
+     can only migrate pages that it can successfully isolate from the LRU
+     lists.  If we were to maintain pages elsewhere than on an LRU-like list,
+     where they can be found by isolate_lru_page(), we would prevent their
+     migration, unless we reworked migration code to find the unevictable pages
+     itself.
 
 
-The unevictable LRU list does not differentiate between file backed and swap
-backed [anon] pages.  This differentiation is only important while the pages
-are, in fact, evictable.
+The unevictable list does not differentiate between file-backed and anonymous,
+swap-backed pages.  This differentiation is only important while the pages are,
+in fact, evictable.
 
-The unevictable LRU list benefits from the "arrayification" of the per-zone
-LRU lists and statistics originally proposed and posted by Christoph Lameter.
+The unevictable list benefits from the "arrayification" of the per-zone LRU
+lists and statistics originally proposed and posted by Christoph Lameter.
 
-The unevictable list does not use the lru pagevec mechanism. Rather,
-unevictable pages are placed directly on the page's zone's unevictable
-list under the zone lru_lock.  The reason for this is to prevent stranding
-of pages on the unevictable list when one task has the page isolated from the
-lru and other tasks are changing the "evictability" state of the page.
+The unevictable list does not use the LRU pagevec mechanism. Rather,
+unevictable pages are placed directly on the page's zone's unevictable list
+under the zone lru_lock.  This allows us to prevent the stranding of pages on
+the unevictable list when one task has the page isolated from the LRU and other
+tasks are changing the "evictability" state of the page.
 
 
-Unevictable LRU and Memory Controller Interaction
+MEMORY CONTROL GROUP INTERACTION
+--------------------------------
 
-The memory controller data structure automatically gets a per zone unevictable
-lru list as a result of the "arrayification" of the per-zone LRU lists.  The
-memory controller tracks the movement of pages to and from the unevictable list.
+The unevictable LRU facility interacts with the memory control group [aka
+memory controller; see Documentation/cgroups/memory.txt] by extending the
+lru_list enum.
+
+The memory controller data structure automatically gets a per-zone unevictable
+list as a result of the "arrayification" of the per-zone LRU lists (one per
+lru_list enum element).  The memory controller tracks the movement of pages to
+and from the unevictable list.
+
 When a memory control group comes under memory pressure, the controller will
 not attempt to reclaim pages on the unevictable list.  This has a couple of
-effects.  Because the pages are "hidden" from reclaim on the unevictable list,
-the reclaim process can be more efficient, dealing only with pages that have
-a chance of being reclaimed.  On the other hand, if too many of the pages
-charged to the control group are unevictable, the evictable portion of the
-working set of the tasks in the control group may not fit into the available
-memory.  This can cause the control group to thrash or to oom-kill tasks.
+effects:
+
+ (1) Because the pages are "hidden" from reclaim on the unevictable list, the
+     reclaim process can be more efficient, dealing only with pages that have a
+     chance of being reclaimed.
+
+ (2) On the other hand, if too many of the pages charged to the control group
+     are unevictable, the evictable portion of the working set of the tasks in
+     the control group may not fit into the available memory.  This can cause
+     the control group to thrash or to OOM-kill tasks.
 
 
-Unevictable LRU:  Detecting Unevictable Pages
+MARKING ADDRESS SPACES UNEVICTABLE
+----------------------------------
 
-The function page_evictable(page, vma) in vmscan.c determines whether a
-page is evictable or not.  For ramfs pages and pages in SHM_LOCKed regions,
-page_evictable() tests a new address space flag, AS_UNEVICTABLE, in the page's
-address space using a wrapper function.  Wrapper functions are used to set,
-clear and test the flag to reduce the requirement for #ifdef's throughout the
-source code.  AS_UNEVICTABLE is set on ramfs inode/mapping when it is created.
-This flag remains for the life of the inode.
+For facilities such as ramfs none of the pages attached to the address space
+may be evicted.  To prevent eviction of any such pages, the AS_UNEVICTABLE
+address space flag is provided, and this can be manipulated by a filesystem
+using a number of wrapper functions:
 
-For shared memory regions, AS_UNEVICTABLE is set when an application
-successfully SHM_LOCKs the region and is removed when the region is
-SHM_UNLOCKed.  Note that shmctl(SHM_LOCK, ...) does not populate the page
-tables for the region as does, for example, mlock().   So, we make no special
-effort to push any pages in the SHM_LOCKed region to the unevictable list.
-Vmscan will do this when/if it encounters the pages during reclaim.  On
-SHM_UNLOCK, shmctl() scans the pages in the region and "rescues" them from the
-unevictable list if no other condition keeps them unevictable.  If a SHM_LOCKed
-region is destroyed, the pages are also "rescued" from the unevictable list in
-the process of freeing them.
+ (*) void mapping_set_unevictable(struct address_space *mapping);
 
-page_evictable() detects mlock()ed pages by testing an additional page flag,
-PG_mlocked via the PageMlocked() wrapper.  If the page is NOT mlocked, and a
-non-NULL vma is supplied, page_evictable() will check whether the vma is
+	Mark the address space as being completely unevictable.
+
+ (*) void mapping_clear_unevictable(struct address_space *mapping);
+
+	Mark the address space as being evictable.
+
+ (*) int mapping_unevictable(struct address_space *mapping);
+
+	Query the address space, and return true if it is completely
+	unevictable.
+
+These are currently used in two places in the kernel:
+
+ (1) By ramfs to mark the address spaces of its inodes when they are created,
+     and this mark remains for the life of the inode.
+
+ (2) By SYSV SHM to mark SHM_LOCK'd address spaces until SHM_UNLOCK is called.
+
+     Note that SHM_LOCK is not required to page in the locked pages if they're
+     swapped out; the application must touch the pages manually if it wants to
+     ensure they're in memory.
+
+
+DETECTING UNEVICTABLE PAGES
+---------------------------
+
+The function page_evictable() in vmscan.c determines whether a page is
+evictable or not using the query function outlined above [see section "Marking
+address spaces unevictable"] to check the AS_UNEVICTABLE flag.
+
+For address spaces that are so marked after being populated (as SHM regions
+might be), the lock action (eg: SHM_LOCK) can be lazy, and need not populate
+the page tables for the region as does, for example, mlock(), nor need it make
+any special effort to push any pages in the SHM_LOCK'd area to the unevictable
+list.  Instead, vmscan will do this if and when it encounters the pages during
+a reclamation scan.
+
+On an unlock action (such as SHM_UNLOCK), the unlocker (eg: shmctl()) must scan
+the pages in the region and "rescue" them from the unevictable list if no other
+condition is keeping them unevictable.  If an unevictable region is destroyed,
+the pages are also "rescued" from the unevictable list in the process of
+freeing them.
+
+page_evictable() also checks for mlocked pages by testing an additional page
+flag, PG_mlocked (as wrapped by PageMlocked()).  If the page is NOT mlocked,
+and a non-NULL VMA is supplied, page_evictable() will check whether the VMA is
 VM_LOCKED via is_mlocked_vma().  is_mlocked_vma() will SetPageMlocked() and
 update the appropriate statistics if the vma is VM_LOCKED.  This method allows
 efficient "culling" of pages in the fault path that are being faulted in to
-VM_LOCKED vmas.
+VM_LOCKED VMAs.
 
 
-Unevictable Pages and Vmscan [shrink_*_list()]
+VMSCAN'S HANDLING OF UNEVICTABLE PAGES
+--------------------------------------
 
 If unevictable pages are culled in the fault path, or moved to the unevictable
-list at mlock() or mmap() time, vmscan will never encounter the pages until
-they have become evictable again, for example, via munlock() and have been
-"rescued" from the unevictable list.  However, there may be situations where we
-decide, for the sake of expediency, to leave a unevictable page on one of the
-regular active/inactive LRU lists for vmscan to deal with.  Vmscan checks for
-such pages in all of the shrink_{active|inactive|page}_list() functions and
-will "cull" such pages that it encounters--that is, it diverts those pages to
-the unevictable list for the zone being scanned.
+list at mlock() or mmap() time, vmscan will not encounter the pages until they
+have become evictable again (via munlock() for example) and have been "rescued"
+from the unevictable list.  However, there may be situations where we decide,
+for the sake of expediency, to leave a unevictable page on one of the regular
+active/inactive LRU lists for vmscan to deal with.  vmscan checks for such
+pages in all of the shrink_{active|inactive|page}_list() functions and will
+"cull" such pages that it encounters: that is, it diverts those pages to the
+unevictable list for the zone being scanned.
 
-There may be situations where a page is mapped into a VM_LOCKED vma, but the
-page is not marked as PageMlocked.  Such pages will make it all the way to
+There may be situations where a page is mapped into a VM_LOCKED VMA, but the
+page is not marked as PG_mlocked.  Such pages will make it all the way to
 shrink_page_list() where they will be detected when vmscan walks the reverse
-map in try_to_unmap().  If try_to_unmap() returns SWAP_MLOCK, shrink_page_list()
-will cull the page at that point.
+map in try_to_unmap().  If try_to_unmap() returns SWAP_MLOCK,
+shrink_page_list() will cull the page at that point.
 
-To "cull" an unevictable page, vmscan simply puts the page back on the lru
-list using putback_lru_page()--the inverse operation to isolate_lru_page()--
-after dropping the page lock.  Because the condition which makes the page
-unevictable may change once the page is unlocked, putback_lru_page() will
-recheck the unevictable state of a page that it places on the unevictable lru
-list.  If the page has become unevictable, putback_lru_page() removes it from
-the list and retries, including the page_unevictable() test.  Because such a
-race is a rare event and movement of pages onto the unevictable list should be
-rare, these extra evictabilty checks should not occur in the majority of calls
-to putback_lru_page().
+To "cull" an unevictable page, vmscan simply puts the page back on the LRU list
+using putback_lru_page() - the inverse operation to isolate_lru_page() - after
+dropping the page lock.  Because the condition which makes the page unevictable
+may change once the page is unlocked, putback_lru_page() will recheck the
+unevictable state of a page that it places on the unevictable list.  If the
+page has become unevictable, putback_lru_page() removes it from the list and
+retries, including the page_unevictable() test.  Because such a race is a rare
+event and movement of pages onto the unevictable list should be rare, these
+extra evictabilty checks should not occur in the majority of calls to
+putback_lru_page().
 
 
-Mlocked Page:  Prior Work
+=============
+MLOCKED PAGES
+=============
 
-The "Unevictable Mlocked Pages" infrastructure is based on work originally
+The unevictable page list is also useful for mlock(), in addition to ramfs and
+SYSV SHM.  Note that mlock() is only available in CONFIG_MMU=y situations; in
+NOMMU situations, all mappings are effectively mlocked.
+
+
+HISTORY
+-------
+
+The "Unevictable mlocked Pages" infrastructure is based on work originally
 posted by Nick Piggin in an RFC patch entitled "mm: mlocked pages off LRU".
-Nick posted his patch as an alternative to a patch posted by Christoph
-Lameter to achieve the same objective--hiding mlocked pages from vmscan.
-In Nick's patch, he used one of the struct page lru list link fields as a count
-of VM_LOCKED vmas that map the page.  This use of the link field for a count
-prevented the management of the pages on an LRU list.  Thus, mlocked pages were
-not migratable as isolate_lru_page() could not find them and the lru list link
-field was not available to the migration subsystem.  Nick resolved this by
-putting mlocked pages back on the lru list before attempting to isolate them,
-thus abandoning the count of VM_LOCKED vmas.  When Nick's patch was integrated
-with the Unevictable LRU work, the count was replaced by walking the reverse
-map to determine whether any VM_LOCKED vmas mapped the page.  More on this
-below.
+Nick posted his patch as an alternative to a patch posted by Christoph Lameter
+to achieve the same objective: hiding mlocked pages from vmscan.
+
+In Nick's patch, he used one of the struct page LRU list link fields as a count
+of VM_LOCKED VMAs that map the page.  This use of the link field for a count
+prevented the management of the pages on an LRU list, and thus mlocked pages
+were not migratable as isolate_lru_page() could not find them, and the LRU list
+link field was not available to the migration subsystem.
+
+Nick resolved this by putting mlocked pages back on the lru list before
+attempting to isolate them, thus abandoning the count of VM_LOCKED VMAs.  When
+Nick's patch was integrated with the Unevictable LRU work, the count was
+replaced by walking the reverse map to determine whether any VM_LOCKED VMAs
+mapped the page.  More on this below.
 
 
-Mlocked Pages:  Basic Management
+BASIC MANAGEMENT
+----------------
 
-Mlocked pages--pages mapped into a VM_LOCKED vma--represent one class of
-unevictable pages.  When such a page has been "noticed" by the memory
-management subsystem, the page is marked with the PG_mlocked [PageMlocked()]
-flag.  A PageMlocked() page will be placed on the unevictable LRU list when
-it is added to the LRU.   Pages can be "noticed" by memory management in
-several places:
+mlocked pages - pages mapped into a VM_LOCKED VMA - are a class of unevictable
+pages.  When such a page has been "noticed" by the memory management subsystem,
+the page is marked with the PG_mlocked flag.  This can be manipulated using the
+PageMlocked() functions.
 
-1) in the mlock()/mlockall() system call handlers.
-2) in the mmap() system call handler when mmap()ing a region with the
-   MAP_LOCKED flag, or mmap()ing a region in a task that has called
-   mlockall() with the MCL_FUTURE flag.  Both of these conditions result
-   in the VM_LOCKED flag being set for the vma.
-3) in the fault path, if mlocked pages are "culled" in the fault path,
-   and when a VM_LOCKED stack segment is expanded.
-4) as mentioned above, in vmscan:shrink_page_list() when attempting to
-   reclaim a page in a VM_LOCKED vma via try_to_unmap().
+A PG_mlocked page will be placed on the unevictable list when it is added to
+the LRU.  Such pages can be "noticed" by memory management in several places:
 
-Mlocked pages become unlocked and rescued from the unevictable list when:
+ (1) in the mlock()/mlockall() system call handlers;
 
-1) mapped in a range unlocked via the munlock()/munlockall() system calls.
-2) munmapped() out of the last VM_LOCKED vma that maps the page, including
-   unmapping at task exit.
-3) when the page is truncated from the last VM_LOCKED vma of an mmap()ed file.
-4) before a page is COWed in a VM_LOCKED vma.
+ (2) in the mmap() system call handler when mmapping a region with the
+     MAP_LOCKED flag;
+
+ (3) mmapping a region in a task that has called mlockall() with the MCL_FUTURE
+     flag
+
+ (4) in the fault path, if mlocked pages are "culled" in the fault path,
+     and when a VM_LOCKED stack segment is expanded; or
+
+ (5) as mentioned above, in vmscan:shrink_page_list() when attempting to
+     reclaim a page in a VM_LOCKED VMA via try_to_unmap()
+
+all of which result in the VM_LOCKED flag being set for the VMA if it doesn't
+already have it set.
+
+mlocked pages become unlocked and rescued from the unevictable list when:
+
+ (1) mapped in a range unlocked via the munlock()/munlockall() system calls;
+
+ (2) munmap()'d out of the last VM_LOCKED VMA that maps the page, including
+     unmapping at task exit;
+
+ (3) when the page is truncated from the last VM_LOCKED VMA of an mmapped file;
+     or
+
+ (4) before a page is COW'd in a VM_LOCKED VMA.
 
 
-Mlocked Pages:  mlock()/mlockall() System Call Handling
+mlock()/mlockall() SYSTEM CALL HANDLING
+---------------------------------------
 
 Both [do_]mlock() and [do_]mlockall() system call handlers call mlock_fixup()
-for each vma in the range specified by the call.  In the case of mlockall(),
+for each VMA in the range specified by the call.  In the case of mlockall(),
 this is the entire active address space of the task.  Note that mlock_fixup()
-is used for both mlock()ing and munlock()ing a range of memory.  A call to
-mlock() an already VM_LOCKED vma, or to munlock() a vma that is not VM_LOCKED
-is treated as a no-op--mlock_fixup() simply returns.
+is used for both mlocking and munlocking a range of memory.  A call to mlock()
+an already VM_LOCKED VMA, or to munlock() a VMA that is not VM_LOCKED is
+treated as a no-op, and mlock_fixup() simply returns.
 
-If the vma passes some filtering described in "Mlocked Pages:  Filtering Vmas"
-below, mlock_fixup() will attempt to merge the vma with its neighbors or split
-off a subset of the vma if the range does not cover the entire vma.  Once the
-vma has been merged or split or neither, mlock_fixup() will call
-__mlock_vma_pages_range() to fault in the pages via get_user_pages() and
-to mark the pages as mlocked via mlock_vma_page().
+If the VMA passes some filtering as described in "Filtering Special Vmas"
+below, mlock_fixup() will attempt to merge the VMA with its neighbors or split
+off a subset of the VMA if the range does not cover the entire VMA.  Once the
+VMA has been merged or split or neither, mlock_fixup() will call
+__mlock_vma_pages_range() to fault in the pages via get_user_pages() and to
+mark the pages as mlocked via mlock_vma_page().
 
-Note that the vma being mlocked might be mapped with PROT_NONE.  In this case,
-get_user_pages() will be unable to fault in the pages.  That's OK.  If pages
-do end up getting faulted into this VM_LOCKED vma, we'll handle them in the
+Note that the VMA being mlocked might be mapped with PROT_NONE.  In this case,
+get_user_pages() will be unable to fault in the pages.  That's okay.  If pages
+do end up getting faulted into this VM_LOCKED VMA, we'll handle them in the
 fault path or in vmscan.
 
 Also note that a page returned by get_user_pages() could be truncated or
-migrated out from under us, while we're trying to mlock it.  To detect
-this, __mlock_vma_pages_range() tests the page_mapping after acquiring
-the page lock.  If the page is still associated with its mapping, we'll
-go ahead and call mlock_vma_page().  If the mapping is gone, we just
-unlock the page and move on.  Worse case, this results in page mapped
-in a VM_LOCKED vma remaining on a normal LRU list without being
-PageMlocked().  Again, vmscan will detect and cull such pages.
+migrated out from under us, while we're trying to mlock it.  To detect this,
+__mlock_vma_pages_range() checks page_mapping() after acquiring the page lock.
+If the page is still associated with its mapping, we'll go ahead and call
+mlock_vma_page().  If the mapping is gone, we just unlock the page and move on.
+In the worst case, this will result in a page mapped in a VM_LOCKED VMA
+remaining on a normal LRU list without being PageMlocked().  Again, vmscan will
+detect and cull such pages.
 
-mlock_vma_page(), called with the page locked [N.B., not "mlocked"], will
-TestSetPageMlocked() for each page returned by get_user_pages().  We use
-TestSetPageMlocked() because the page might already be mlocked by another
-task/vma and we don't want to do extra work.  We especially do not want to
-count an mlocked page more than once in the statistics.  If the page was
-already mlocked, mlock_vma_page() is done.
+mlock_vma_page() will call TestSetPageMlocked() for each page returned by
+get_user_pages().  We use TestSetPageMlocked() because the page might already
+be mlocked by another task/VMA and we don't want to do extra work.  We
+especially do not want to count an mlocked page more than once in the
+statistics.  If the page was already mlocked, mlock_vma_page() need do nothing
+more.
 
 If the page was NOT already mlocked, mlock_vma_page() attempts to isolate the
 page from the LRU, as it is likely on the appropriate active or inactive list
-at that time.  If the isolate_lru_page() succeeds, mlock_vma_page() will
-putback the page--putback_lru_page()--which will notice that the page is now
-mlocked and divert the page to the zone's unevictable LRU list.  If
+at that time.  If the isolate_lru_page() succeeds, mlock_vma_page() will put
+back the page - by calling putback_lru_page() - which will notice that the page
+is now mlocked and divert the page to the zone's unevictable list.  If
 mlock_vma_page() is unable to isolate the page from the LRU, vmscan will handle
-it later if/when it attempts to reclaim the page.
+it later if and when it attempts to reclaim the page.
 
 
-Mlocked Pages:  Filtering Special Vmas
+FILTERING SPECIAL VMAS
+----------------------
 
-mlock_fixup() filters several classes of "special" vmas:
+mlock_fixup() filters several classes of "special" VMAs:
 
-1) vmas with VM_IO|VM_PFNMAP set are skipped entirely.  The pages behind
+1) VMAs with VM_IO or VM_PFNMAP set are skipped entirely.  The pages behind
    these mappings are inherently pinned, so we don't need to mark them as
-   mlocked.  In any case, most of the pages have no struct page in which to
-   so mark the page.  Because of this, get_user_pages() will fail for these
-   vmas, so there is no sense in attempting to visit them.
+   mlocked.  In any case, most of the pages have no struct page in which to so
+   mark the page.  Because of this, get_user_pages() will fail for these VMAs,
+   so there is no sense in attempting to visit them.
 
-2) vmas mapping hugetlbfs page are already effectively pinned into memory.
-   We don't need nor want to mlock() these pages.  However, to preserve the
-   prior behavior of mlock()--before the unevictable/mlock changes--
-   mlock_fixup() will call make_pages_present() in the hugetlbfs vma range
-   to allocate the huge pages and populate the ptes.
+2) VMAs mapping hugetlbfs page are already effectively pinned into memory.  We
+   neither need nor want to mlock() these pages.  However, to preserve the
+   prior behavior of mlock() - before the unevictable/mlock changes -
+   mlock_fixup() will call make_pages_present() in the hugetlbfs VMA range to
+   allocate the huge pages and populate the ptes.
 
-3) vmas with VM_DONTEXPAND|VM_RESERVED are generally user space mappings of
-   kernel pages, such as the vdso page, relay channel pages, etc.  These pages
+3) VMAs with VM_DONTEXPAND or VM_RESERVED are generally userspace mappings of
+   kernel pages, such as the VDSO page, relay channel pages, etc.  These pages
    are inherently unevictable and are not managed on the LRU lists.
-   mlock_fixup() treats these vmas the same as hugetlbfs vmas.  It calls
+   mlock_fixup() treats these VMAs the same as hugetlbfs VMAs.  It calls
    make_pages_present() to populate the ptes.
 
-Note that for all of these special vmas, mlock_fixup() does not set the
+Note that for all of these special VMAs, mlock_fixup() does not set the
 VM_LOCKED flag.  Therefore, we won't have to deal with them later during
-munlock() or munmap()--for example, at task exit.  Neither does mlock_fixup()
-account these vmas against the task's "locked_vm".
-
-Mlocked Pages:  Downgrading the Mmap Semaphore.
-
-mlock_fixup() must be called with the mmap semaphore held for write, because
-it may have to merge or split vmas.  However, mlocking a large region of
-memory can take a long time--especially if vmscan must reclaim pages to
-satisfy the regions requirements.  Faulting in a large region with the mmap
-semaphore held for write can hold off other faults on the address space, in
-the case of a multi-threaded task.  It can also hold off scans of the task's
-address space via /proc.  While testing under heavy load, it was observed that
-the ps(1) command could be held off for many minutes while a large segment was
-mlock()ed down.
-
-To address this issue, and to make the system more responsive during mlock()ing
-of large segments, mlock_fixup() downgrades the mmap semaphore to read mode
-during the call to __mlock_vma_pages_range().  This works fine.  However, the
-callers of mlock_fixup() expect the semaphore to be returned in write mode.
-So, mlock_fixup() "upgrades" the semphore to write mode.  Linux does not
-support an atomic upgrade_sem() call, so mlock_fixup() must drop the semaphore
-and reacquire it in write mode.  In a multi-threaded task, it is possible for
-the task memory map to change while the semaphore is dropped.  Therefore,
-mlock_fixup() looks up the vma at the range start address after reacquiring
-the semaphore in write mode and verifies that it still covers the original
-range.  If not, mlock_fixup() returns an error [-EAGAIN].  All callers of
-mlock_fixup() have been changed to deal with this new error condition.
-
-Note:  when munlocking a region, all of the pages should already be resident--
-unless we have racing threads mlocking() and munlocking() regions.  So,
-unlocking should not have to wait for page allocations nor faults  of any kind.
-Therefore mlock_fixup() does not downgrade the semaphore for munlock().
+munlock(), munmap() or task exit.  Neither does mlock_fixup() account these
+VMAs against the task's "locked_vm".
 
 
-Mlocked Pages:  munlock()/munlockall() System Call Handling
+munlock()/munlockall() SYSTEM CALL HANDLING
+-------------------------------------------
 
-The munlock() and munlockall() system calls are handled by the same functions--
-do_mlock[all]()--as the mlock() and mlockall() system calls with the unlock
-vs lock operation indicated by an argument.  So, these system calls are also
-handled by mlock_fixup().  Again, if called for an already munlock()ed vma,
-mlock_fixup() simply returns.  Because of the vma filtering discussed above,
-VM_LOCKED will not be set in any "special" vmas.  So, these vmas will be
+The munlock() and munlockall() system calls are handled by the same functions -
+do_mlock[all]() - as the mlock() and mlockall() system calls with the unlock vs
+lock operation indicated by an argument.  So, these system calls are also
+handled by mlock_fixup().  Again, if called for an already munlocked VMA,
+mlock_fixup() simply returns.  Because of the VMA filtering discussed above,
+VM_LOCKED will not be set in any "special" VMAs.  So, these VMAs will be
 ignored for munlock.
 
-If the vma is VM_LOCKED, mlock_fixup() again attempts to merge or split off
-the specified range.  The range is then munlocked via the function
-__mlock_vma_pages_range()--the same function used to mlock a vma range--
+If the VMA is VM_LOCKED, mlock_fixup() again attempts to merge or split off the
+specified range.  The range is then munlocked via the function
+__mlock_vma_pages_range() - the same function used to mlock a VMA range -
 passing a flag to indicate that munlock() is being performed.
 
-Because the vma access protections could have been changed to PROT_NONE after
+Because the VMA access protections could have been changed to PROT_NONE after
 faulting in and mlocking pages, get_user_pages() was unreliable for visiting
-these pages for munlocking.  Because we don't want to leave pages mlocked(),
+these pages for munlocking.  Because we don't want to leave pages mlocked,
 get_user_pages() was enhanced to accept a flag to ignore the permissions when
-fetching the pages--all of which should be resident as a result of previous
-mlock()ing.
+fetching the pages - all of which should be resident as a result of previous
+mlocking.
 
 For munlock(), __mlock_vma_pages_range() unlocks individual pages by calling
 munlock_vma_page().  munlock_vma_page() unconditionally clears the PG_mlocked
-flag using TestClearPageMlocked().  As with mlock_vma_page(), munlock_vma_page()
-use the Test*PageMlocked() function to handle the case where the page might
-have already been unlocked by another task.  If the page was mlocked,
-munlock_vma_page() updates that zone statistics for the number of mlocked
-pages.  Note, however, that at this point we haven't checked whether the page
-is mapped by other VM_LOCKED vmas.
+flag using TestClearPageMlocked().  As with mlock_vma_page(),
+munlock_vma_page() use the Test*PageMlocked() function to handle the case where
+the page might have already been unlocked by another task.  If the page was
+mlocked, munlock_vma_page() updates that zone statistics for the number of
+mlocked pages.  Note, however, that at this point we haven't checked whether
+the page is mapped by other VM_LOCKED VMAs.
 
-We can't call try_to_munlock(), the function that walks the reverse map to check
-for other VM_LOCKED vmas, without first isolating the page from the LRU.
+We can't call try_to_munlock(), the function that walks the reverse map to
+check for other VM_LOCKED VMAs, without first isolating the page from the LRU.
 try_to_munlock() is a variant of try_to_unmap() and thus requires that the page
-not be on an lru list.  [More on these below.]  However, the call to
-isolate_lru_page() could fail, in which case we couldn't try_to_munlock().
-So, we go ahead and clear PG_mlocked up front, as this might be the only chance
-we have.  If we can successfully isolate the page, we go ahead and
+not be on an LRU list [more on these below].  However, the call to
+isolate_lru_page() could fail, in which case we couldn't try_to_munlock().  So,
+we go ahead and clear PG_mlocked up front, as this might be the only chance we
+have.  If we can successfully isolate the page, we go ahead and
 try_to_munlock(), which will restore the PG_mlocked flag and update the zone
-page statistics if it finds another vma holding the page mlocked.  If we fail
+page statistics if it finds another VMA holding the page mlocked.  If we fail
 to isolate the page, we'll have left a potentially mlocked page on the LRU.
-This is fine, because we'll catch it later when/if vmscan tries to reclaim the
-page.  This should be relatively rare.
-
-Mlocked Pages:  Migrating Them...
-
-A page that is being migrated has been isolated from the lru lists and is
-held locked across unmapping of the page, updating the page's mapping
-[address_space] entry and copying the contents and state, until the
-page table entry has been replaced with an entry that refers to the new
-page.  Linux supports migration of mlocked pages and other unevictable
-pages.  This involves simply moving the PageMlocked and PageUnevictable states
-from the old page to the new page.
-
-Note that page migration can race with mlocking or munlocking of the same
-page.  This has been discussed from the mlock/munlock perspective in the
-respective sections above.  Both processes [migration, m[un]locking], hold
-the page locked.  This provides the first level of synchronization.  Page
-migration zeros out the page_mapping of the old page before unlocking it,
-so m[un]lock can skip these pages by testing the page mapping under page
-lock.
-
-When completing page migration, we place the new and old pages back onto the
-lru after dropping the page lock.  The "unneeded" page--old page on success,
-new page on failure--will be freed when the reference count held by the
-migration process is released.  To ensure that we don't strand pages on the
-unevictable list because of a race between munlock and migration, page
-migration uses the putback_lru_page() function to add migrated pages back to
-the lru.
+This is fine, because we'll catch it later if and if vmscan tries to reclaim
+the page.  This should be relatively rare.
 
 
-Mlocked Pages:  mmap(MAP_LOCKED) System Call Handling
+MIGRATING MLOCKED PAGES
+-----------------------
+
+A page that is being migrated has been isolated from the LRU lists and is held
+locked across unmapping of the page, updating the page's address space entry
+and copying the contents and state, until the page table entry has been
+replaced with an entry that refers to the new page.  Linux supports migration
+of mlocked pages and other unevictable pages.  This involves simply moving the
+PG_mlocked and PG_unevictable states from the old page to the new page.
+
+Note that page migration can race with mlocking or munlocking of the same page.
+This has been discussed from the mlock/munlock perspective in the respective
+sections above.  Both processes (migration and m[un]locking) hold the page
+locked.  This provides the first level of synchronization.  Page migration
+zeros out the page_mapping of the old page before unlocking it, so m[un]lock
+can skip these pages by testing the page mapping under page lock.
+
+To complete page migration, we place the new and old pages back onto the LRU
+after dropping the page lock.  The "unneeded" page - old page on success, new
+page on failure - will be freed when the reference count held by the migration
+process is released.  To ensure that we don't strand pages on the unevictable
+list because of a race between munlock and migration, page migration uses the
+putback_lru_page() function to add migrated pages back to the LRU.
+
+
+mmap(MAP_LOCKED) SYSTEM CALL HANDLING
+-------------------------------------
 
 In addition the the mlock()/mlockall() system calls, an application can request
-that a region of memory be mlocked using the MAP_LOCKED flag with the mmap()
+that a region of memory be mlocked supplying the MAP_LOCKED flag to the mmap()
 call.  Furthermore, any mmap() call or brk() call that expands the heap by a
 task that has previously called mlockall() with the MCL_FUTURE flag will result
-in the newly mapped memory being mlocked.  Before the unevictable/mlock changes,
-the kernel simply called make_pages_present() to allocate pages and populate
-the page table.
+in the newly mapped memory being mlocked.  Before the unevictable/mlock
+changes, the kernel simply called make_pages_present() to allocate pages and
+populate the page table.
 
 To mlock a range of memory under the unevictable/mlock infrastructure, the
 mmap() handler and task address space expansion functions call
 mlock_vma_pages_range() specifying the vma and the address range to mlock.
-mlock_vma_pages_range() filters vmas like mlock_fixup(), as described above in
-"Mlocked Pages:  Filtering Vmas".  It will clear the VM_LOCKED flag, which will
-have already been set by the caller, in filtered vmas.  Thus these vma's need
-not be visited for munlock when the region is unmapped.
+mlock_vma_pages_range() filters VMAs like mlock_fixup(), as described above in
+"Filtering Special VMAs".  It will clear the VM_LOCKED flag, which will have
+already been set by the caller, in filtered VMAs.  Thus these VMA's need not be
+visited for munlock when the region is unmapped.
 
-For "normal" vmas, mlock_vma_pages_range() calls __mlock_vma_pages_range() to
+For "normal" VMAs, mlock_vma_pages_range() calls __mlock_vma_pages_range() to
 fault/allocate the pages and mlock them.  Again, like mlock_fixup(),
 mlock_vma_pages_range() downgrades the mmap semaphore to read mode before
-attempting to fault/allocate and mlock the pages; and "upgrades" the semaphore
+attempting to fault/allocate and mlock the pages and "upgrades" the semaphore
 back to write mode before returning.
 
-The callers of mlock_vma_pages_range() will have already added the memory
-range to be mlocked to the task's "locked_vm".  To account for filtered vmas,
+The callers of mlock_vma_pages_range() will have already added the memory range
+to be mlocked to the task's "locked_vm".  To account for filtered VMAs,
 mlock_vma_pages_range() returns the number of pages NOT mlocked.  All of the
-callers then subtract a non-negative return value from the task's locked_vm.
-A negative return value represent an error--for example, from get_user_pages()
-attempting to fault in a vma with PROT_NONE access.  In this case, we leave
-the memory range accounted as locked_vm, as the protections could be changed
-later and pages allocated into that region.
+callers then subtract a non-negative return value from the task's locked_vm.  A
+negative return value represent an error - for example, from get_user_pages()
+attempting to fault in a VMA with PROT_NONE access.  In this case, we leave the
+memory range accounted as locked_vm, as the protections could be changed later
+and pages allocated into that region.
 
 
-Mlocked Pages:  munmap()/exit()/exec() System Call Handling
+munmap()/exit()/exec() SYSTEM CALL HANDLING
+-------------------------------------------
 
 When unmapping an mlocked region of memory, whether by an explicit call to
 munmap() or via an internal unmap from exit() or exec() processing, we must
-munlock the pages if we're removing the last VM_LOCKED vma that maps the pages.
+munlock the pages if we're removing the last VM_LOCKED VMA that maps the pages.
 Before the unevictable/mlock changes, mlocking did not mark the pages in any
 way, so unmapping them required no processing.
 
 To munlock a range of memory under the unevictable/mlock infrastructure, the
-munmap() hander and task address space tear down function call
+munmap() handler and task address space call tear down function
 munlock_vma_pages_all().  The name reflects the observation that one always
-specifies the entire vma range when munlock()ing during unmap of a region.
-Because of the vma filtering when mlocking() regions, only "normal" vmas that
+specifies the entire VMA range when munlock()ing during unmap of a region.
+Because of the VMA filtering when mlocking() regions, only "normal" VMAs that
 actually contain mlocked pages will be passed to munlock_vma_pages_all().
 
-munlock_vma_pages_all() clears the VM_LOCKED vma flag and, like mlock_fixup()
+munlock_vma_pages_all() clears the VM_LOCKED VMA flag and, like mlock_fixup()
 for the munlock case, calls __munlock_vma_pages_range() to walk the page table
-for the vma's memory range and munlock_vma_page() each resident page mapped by
-the vma.  This effectively munlocks the page, only if this is the last
-VM_LOCKED vma that maps the page.
+for the VMA's memory range and munlock_vma_page() each resident page mapped by
+the VMA.  This effectively munlocks the page, only if this is the last
+VM_LOCKED VMA that maps the page.
 
 
-Mlocked Page:  try_to_unmap()
+try_to_unmap()
+--------------
 
-[Note:  the code changes represented by this section are really quite small
-compared to the text to describe what happening and why, and to discuss the
-implications.]
-
-Pages can, of course, be mapped into multiple vmas.  Some of these vmas may
+Pages can, of course, be mapped into multiple VMAs.  Some of these VMAs may
 have VM_LOCKED flag set.  It is possible for a page mapped into one or more
-VM_LOCKED vmas not to have the PG_mlocked flag set and therefore reside on one
-of the active or inactive LRU lists.  This could happen if, for example, a
-task in the process of munlock()ing the page could not isolate the page from
-the LRU.  As a result, vmscan/shrink_page_list() might encounter such a page
-as described in "Unevictable Pages and Vmscan [shrink_*_list()]".  To
-handle this situation, try_to_unmap() has been enhanced to check for VM_LOCKED
-vmas while it is walking a page's reverse map.
+VM_LOCKED VMAs not to have the PG_mlocked flag set and therefore reside on one
+of the active or inactive LRU lists.  This could happen if, for example, a task
+in the process of munlocking the page could not isolate the page from the LRU.
+As a result, vmscan/shrink_page_list() might encounter such a page as described
+in section "vmscan's handling of unevictable pages".  To handle this situation,
+try_to_unmap() checks for VM_LOCKED VMAs while it is walking a page's reverse
+map.
 
 try_to_unmap() is always called, by either vmscan for reclaim or for page
-migration, with the argument page locked and isolated from the LRU.  BUG_ON()
-assertions enforce this requirement.  Separate functions handle anonymous and
-mapped file pages, as these types of pages have different reverse map
-mechanisms.
+migration, with the argument page locked and isolated from the LRU.  Separate
+functions handle anonymous and mapped file pages, as these types of pages have
+different reverse map mechanisms.
 
-	try_to_unmap_anon()
+ (*) try_to_unmap_anon()
 
-To unmap anonymous pages, each vma in the list anchored in the anon_vma must be
-visited--at least until a VM_LOCKED vma is encountered.  If the page is being
-unmapped for migration, VM_LOCKED vmas do not stop the process because mlocked
-pages are migratable.  However, for reclaim, if the page is mapped into a
-VM_LOCKED vma, the scan stops.  try_to_unmap() attempts to acquire the mmap
-semphore of the mm_struct to which the vma belongs in read mode.  If this is
-successful, try_to_unmap() will mlock the page via mlock_vma_page()--we
-wouldn't have gotten to try_to_unmap() if the page were already mlocked--and
-will return SWAP_MLOCK, indicating that the page is unevictable.  If the
-mmap semaphore cannot be acquired, we are not sure whether the page is really
-unevictable or not.  In this case, try_to_unmap() will return SWAP_AGAIN.
+     To unmap anonymous pages, each VMA in the list anchored in the anon_vma
+     must be visited - at least until a VM_LOCKED VMA is encountered.  If the
+     page is being unmapped for migration, VM_LOCKED VMAs do not stop the
+     process because mlocked pages are migratable.  However, for reclaim, if
+     the page is mapped into a VM_LOCKED VMA, the scan stops.
 
-	try_to_unmap_file() -- linear mappings
+     try_to_unmap_anon() attempts to acquire in read mode the mmap semphore of
+     the mm_struct to which the VMA belongs.  If this is successful, it will
+     mlock the page via mlock_vma_page() - we wouldn't have gotten to
+     try_to_unmap_anon() if the page were already mlocked - and will return
+     SWAP_MLOCK, indicating that the page is unevictable.
 
-Unmapping of a mapped file page works the same, except that the scan visits
-all vmas that maps the page's index/page offset in the page's mapping's
-reverse map priority search tree.  It must also visit each vma in the page's
-mapping's non-linear list, if the list is non-empty.  As for anonymous pages,
-on encountering a VM_LOCKED vma for a mapped file page, try_to_unmap() will
-attempt to acquire the associated mm_struct's mmap semaphore to mlock the page,
-returning SWAP_MLOCK if this is successful, and SWAP_AGAIN, if not.
+     If the mmap semaphore cannot be acquired, we are not sure whether the page
+     is really unevictable or not.  In this case, try_to_unmap_anon() will
+     return SWAP_AGAIN.
 
-	try_to_unmap_file() -- non-linear mappings
+ (*) try_to_unmap_file() - linear mappings
 
-If a page's mapping contains a non-empty non-linear mapping vma list, then
-try_to_un{map|lock}() must also visit each vma in that list to determine
-whether the page is mapped in a VM_LOCKED vma.  Again, the scan must visit
-all vmas in the non-linear list to ensure that the pages is not/should not be
-mlocked.  If a VM_LOCKED vma is found in the list, the scan could terminate.
-However, there is no easy way to determine whether the page is actually mapped
-in a given vma--either for unmapping or testing whether the VM_LOCKED vma
-actually pins the page.
+     Unmapping of a mapped file page works the same as for anonymous mappings,
+     except that the scan visits all VMAs that map the page's index/page offset
+     in the page's mapping's reverse map priority search tree.  It also visits
+     each VMA in the page's mapping's non-linear list, if the list is
+     non-empty.
 
-So, try_to_unmap_file() handles non-linear mappings by scanning a certain
-number of pages--a "cluster"--in each non-linear vma associated with the page's
-mapping, for each file mapped page that vmscan tries to unmap.  If this happens
-to unmap the page we're trying to unmap, try_to_unmap() will notice this on
-return--(page_mapcount(page) == 0)--and return SWAP_SUCCESS.  Otherwise, it
-will return SWAP_AGAIN, causing vmscan to recirculate this page.  We take
-advantage of the cluster scan in try_to_unmap_cluster() as follows:
+     As for anonymous pages, on encountering a VM_LOCKED VMA for a mapped file
+     page, try_to_unmap_file() will attempt to acquire the associated
+     mm_struct's mmap semaphore to mlock the page, returning SWAP_MLOCK if this
+     is successful, and SWAP_AGAIN, if not.
 
-For each non-linear vma, try_to_unmap_cluster() attempts to acquire the mmap
-semaphore of the associated mm_struct for read without blocking.  If this
-attempt is successful and the vma is VM_LOCKED, try_to_unmap_cluster() will
-retain the mmap semaphore for the scan; otherwise it drops it here.  Then,
-for each page in the cluster, if we're holding the mmap semaphore for a locked
-vma, try_to_unmap_cluster() calls mlock_vma_page() to mlock the page.  This
-call is a no-op if the page is already locked, but will mlock any pages in
-the non-linear mapping that happen to be unlocked.  If one of the pages so
-mlocked is the page passed in to try_to_unmap(), try_to_unmap_cluster() will
-return SWAP_MLOCK, rather than the default SWAP_AGAIN.  This will allow vmscan
-to cull the page, rather than recirculating it on the inactive list.  Again,
-if try_to_unmap_cluster() cannot acquire the vma's mmap sem, it returns
-SWAP_AGAIN, indicating that the page is mapped by a VM_LOCKED vma, but
-couldn't be mlocked.
+ (*) try_to_unmap_file() - non-linear mappings
+
+     If a page's mapping contains a non-empty non-linear mapping VMA list, then
+     try_to_un{map|lock}() must also visit each VMA in that list to determine
+     whether the page is mapped in a VM_LOCKED VMA.  Again, the scan must visit
+     all VMAs in the non-linear list to ensure that the pages is not/should not
+     be mlocked.
+
+     If a VM_LOCKED VMA is found in the list, the scan could terminate.
+     However, there is no easy way to determine whether the page is actually
+     mapped in a given VMA - either for unmapping or testing whether the
+     VM_LOCKED VMA actually pins the page.
+
+     try_to_unmap_file() handles non-linear mappings by scanning a certain
+     number of pages - a "cluster" - in each non-linear VMA associated with the
+     page's mapping, for each file mapped page that vmscan tries to unmap.  If
+     this happens to unmap the page we're trying to unmap, try_to_unmap() will
+     notice this on return (page_mapcount(page) will be 0) and return
+     SWAP_SUCCESS.  Otherwise, it will return SWAP_AGAIN, causing vmscan to
+     recirculate this page.  We take advantage of the cluster scan in
+     try_to_unmap_cluster() as follows:
+
+	For each non-linear VMA, try_to_unmap_cluster() attempts to acquire the
+	mmap semaphore of the associated mm_struct for read without blocking.
+
+	If this attempt is successful and the VMA is VM_LOCKED,
+	try_to_unmap_cluster() will retain the mmap semaphore for the scan;
+	otherwise it drops it here.
+
+	Then, for each page in the cluster, if we're holding the mmap semaphore
+	for a locked VMA, try_to_unmap_cluster() calls mlock_vma_page() to
+	mlock the page.  This call is a no-op if the page is already locked,
+	but will mlock any pages in the non-linear mapping that happen to be
+	unlocked.
+
+	If one of the pages so mlocked is the page passed in to try_to_unmap(),
+	try_to_unmap_cluster() will return SWAP_MLOCK, rather than the default
+	SWAP_AGAIN.  This will allow vmscan to cull the page, rather than
+	recirculating it on the inactive list.
+
+	Again, if try_to_unmap_cluster() cannot acquire the VMA's mmap sem, it
+	returns SWAP_AGAIN, indicating that the page is mapped by a VM_LOCKED
+	VMA, but couldn't be mlocked.
 
 
-Mlocked pages:  try_to_munlock() Reverse Map Scan
+try_to_munlock() REVERSE MAP SCAN
+---------------------------------
 
-TODO/FIXME:  a better name might be page_mlocked()--analogous to the
-page_referenced() reverse map walker.
+ [!] TODO/FIXME: a better name might be page_mlocked() - analogous to the
+     page_referenced() reverse map walker.
 
-When munlock_vma_page()--see "Mlocked Pages:  munlock()/munlockall()
-System Call Handling" above--tries to munlock a page, it needs to
-determine whether or not the page is mapped by any VM_LOCKED vma, without
-actually attempting to unmap all ptes from the page.  For this purpose, the
-unevictable/mlock infrastructure introduced a variant of try_to_unmap() called
-try_to_munlock().
+When munlock_vma_page() [see section "munlock()/munlockall() System Call
+Handling" above] tries to munlock a page, it needs to determine whether or not
+the page is mapped by any VM_LOCKED VMA without actually attempting to unmap
+all PTEs from the page.  For this purpose, the unevictable/mlock infrastructure
+introduced a variant of try_to_unmap() called try_to_munlock().
 
 try_to_munlock() calls the same functions as try_to_unmap() for anonymous and
 mapped file pages with an additional argument specifing unlock versus unmap
 processing.  Again, these functions walk the respective reverse maps looking
-for VM_LOCKED vmas.  When such a vma is found for anonymous pages and file
+for VM_LOCKED VMAs.  When such a VMA is found for anonymous pages and file
 pages mapped in linear VMAs, as in the try_to_unmap() case, the functions
 attempt to acquire the associated mmap semphore, mlock the page via
 mlock_vma_page() and return SWAP_MLOCK.  This effectively undoes the
 pre-clearing of the page's PG_mlocked done by munlock_vma_page.
 
-If try_to_unmap() is unable to acquire a VM_LOCKED vma's associated mmap
-semaphore, it will return SWAP_AGAIN.  This will allow shrink_page_list()
-to recycle the page on the inactive list and hope that it has better luck
-with the page next time.
+If try_to_unmap() is unable to acquire a VM_LOCKED VMA's associated mmap
+semaphore, it will return SWAP_AGAIN.  This will allow shrink_page_list() to
+recycle the page on the inactive list and hope that it has better luck with the
+page next time.
 
-For file pages mapped into non-linear vmas, the try_to_munlock() logic works
-slightly differently.  On encountering a VM_LOCKED non-linear vma that might
-map the page, try_to_munlock() returns SWAP_AGAIN without actually mlocking
-the page.  munlock_vma_page() will just leave the page unlocked and let
-vmscan deal with it--the usual fallback position.
+For file pages mapped into non-linear VMAs, the try_to_munlock() logic works
+slightly differently.  On encountering a VM_LOCKED non-linear VMA that might
+map the page, try_to_munlock() returns SWAP_AGAIN without actually mlocking the
+page.  munlock_vma_page() will just leave the page unlocked and let vmscan deal
+with it - the usual fallback position.
 
-Note that try_to_munlock()'s reverse map walk must visit every vma in a pages'
-reverse map to determine that a page is NOT mapped into any VM_LOCKED vma.
-However, the scan can terminate when it encounters a VM_LOCKED vma and can
-successfully acquire the vma's mmap semphore for read and mlock the page.
-Although try_to_munlock() can be called many [very many!] times when
-munlock()ing a large region or tearing down a large address space that has been
-mlocked via mlockall(), overall this is a fairly rare event.
+Note that try_to_munlock()'s reverse map walk must visit every VMA in a page's
+reverse map to determine that a page is NOT mapped into any VM_LOCKED VMA.
+However, the scan can terminate when it encounters a VM_LOCKED VMA and can
+successfully acquire the VMA's mmap semphore for read and mlock the page.
+Although try_to_munlock() might be called a great many times when munlocking a
+large region or tearing down a large address space that has been mlocked via
+mlockall(), overall this is a fairly rare event.
 
-Mlocked Page:  Page Reclaim in shrink_*_list()
 
-shrink_active_list() culls any obviously unevictable pages--i.e.,
-!page_evictable(page, NULL)--diverting these to the unevictable lru
-list.  However, shrink_active_list() only sees unevictable pages that
-made it onto the active/inactive lru lists.  Note that these pages do not
-have PageUnevictable set--otherwise, they would be on the unevictable list and
-shrink_active_list would never see them.
+PAGE RECLAIM IN shrink_*_list()
+-------------------------------
+
+shrink_active_list() culls any obviously unevictable pages - i.e.
+!page_evictable(page, NULL) - diverting these to the unevictable list.
+However, shrink_active_list() only sees unevictable pages that made it onto the
+active/inactive lru lists.  Note that these pages do not have PageUnevictable
+set - otherwise they would be on the unevictable list and shrink_active_list
+would never see them.
 
 Some examples of these unevictable pages on the LRU lists are:
 
-1) ramfs pages that have been placed on the lru lists when first allocated.
+ (1) ramfs pages that have been placed on the LRU lists when first allocated.
 
-2) SHM_LOCKed shared memory pages.  shmctl(SHM_LOCK) does not attempt to
-   allocate or fault in the pages in the shared memory region.  This happens
-   when an application accesses the page the first time after SHM_LOCKing
-   the segment.
+ (2) SHM_LOCK'd shared memory pages.  shmctl(SHM_LOCK) does not attempt to
+     allocate or fault in the pages in the shared memory region.  This happens
+     when an application accesses the page the first time after SHM_LOCK'ing
+     the segment.
 
-3) Mlocked pages that could not be isolated from the lru and moved to the
-   unevictable list in mlock_vma_page().
+ (3) mlocked pages that could not be isolated from the LRU and moved to the
+     unevictable list in mlock_vma_page().
 
-3) Pages mapped into multiple VM_LOCKED vmas, but try_to_munlock() couldn't
-   acquire the vma's mmap semaphore to test the flags and set PageMlocked.
-   munlock_vma_page() was forced to let the page back on to the normal
-   LRU list for vmscan to handle.
+ (4) Pages mapped into multiple VM_LOCKED VMAs, but try_to_munlock() couldn't
+     acquire the VMA's mmap semaphore to test the flags and set PageMlocked.
+     munlock_vma_page() was forced to let the page back on to the normal LRU
+     list for vmscan to handle.
 
-shrink_inactive_list() also culls any unevictable pages that it finds on
-the inactive lists, again diverting them to the appropriate zone's unevictable
-lru list.  shrink_inactive_list() should only see SHM_LOCKed pages that became
-SHM_LOCKed after shrink_active_list() had moved them to the inactive list, or
-pages mapped into VM_LOCKED vmas that munlock_vma_page() couldn't isolate from
-the lru to recheck via try_to_munlock().  shrink_inactive_list() won't notice
-the latter, but will pass on to shrink_page_list().
+shrink_inactive_list() also diverts any unevictable pages that it finds on the
+inactive lists to the appropriate zone's unevictable list.
+
+shrink_inactive_list() should only see SHM_LOCK'd pages that became SHM_LOCK'd
+after shrink_active_list() had moved them to the inactive list, or pages mapped
+into VM_LOCKED VMAs that munlock_vma_page() couldn't isolate from the LRU to
+recheck via try_to_munlock().  shrink_inactive_list() won't notice the latter,
+but will pass on to shrink_page_list().
 
 shrink_page_list() again culls obviously unevictable pages that it could
 encounter for similar reason to shrink_inactive_list().  Pages mapped into
-VM_LOCKED vmas but without PG_mlocked set will make it all the way to
+VM_LOCKED VMAs but without PG_mlocked set will make it all the way to
 try_to_unmap().  shrink_page_list() will divert them to the unevictable list
 when try_to_unmap() returns SWAP_MLOCK, as discussed above.
diff --git a/Documentation/x86/x86_64/fake-numa-for-cpusets b/Documentation/x86/x86_64/fake-numa-for-cpusets
index 33bb566..0f11d9be 100644
--- a/Documentation/x86/x86_64/fake-numa-for-cpusets
+++ b/Documentation/x86/x86_64/fake-numa-for-cpusets
@@ -7,7 +7,8 @@
 assign them to cpusets and their attached tasks.  This is a way of limiting the
 amount of system memory that are available to a certain class of tasks.
 
-For more information on the features of cpusets, see Documentation/cpusets.txt.
+For more information on the features of cpusets, see
+Documentation/cgroups/cpusets.txt.
 There are a number of different configurations you can use for your needs.  For
 more information on the numa=fake command line option and its various ways of
 configuring fake nodes, see Documentation/x86/x86_64/boot-options.txt.
@@ -32,7 +33,7 @@
 	On node 3 totalpages: 131072
 
 Now following the instructions for mounting the cpusets filesystem from
-Documentation/cpusets.txt, you can assign fake nodes (i.e. contiguous memory
+Documentation/cgroups/cpusets.txt, you can assign fake nodes (i.e. contiguous memory
 address spaces) to individual cpusets:
 
 	[root@xroads /]# mkdir exampleset
diff --git a/MAINTAINERS b/MAINTAINERS
index ebaf77e..0cb20d8 100644
--- a/MAINTAINERS
+++ b/MAINTAINERS
@@ -72,7 +72,6 @@
 L: Mailing list that is relevant to this area
 W: Web-page with status/info
 T: SCM tree type and location.  Type is one of: git, hg, quilt.
-F: Applicable files and/or directories
 S: Status, one of the following:
 
 	Supported:	Someone is actually paid to look after this.
@@ -85,23 +84,40 @@
 			it has been replaced by a better system and you
 			should be using that.
 
+F: Files and directories with wildcard patterns.
+   A trailing slash includes all files and subdirectory files.
+	F:	drivers/net/	all files in and below drivers/net
+	F:	drivers/net/*	all files in drivers/net, but not below
+	F:	*/net/*		all files in "any top level directory"/net
+   One pattern per line.  Multiple F: lines acceptable.
+X: Files and directories that are NOT maintained, same rules as F:
+   Files exclusions are tested before file matches.
+   Can be useful for excluding a specific subdirectory, for instance:
+	F:	net/
+	X:	net/ipv6/
+   matches all files in and below net excluding net/ipv6/
+
 3C505 NETWORK DRIVER
 P:	Philip Blundell
 M:	philb@gnu.org
 L:	netdev@vger.kernel.org
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/net/3c505*
 
 3C59X NETWORK DRIVER
 P:	Steffen Klassert
 M:	klassert@mathematik.tu-chemnitz.de
 L:	netdev@vger.kernel.org
 S:	Maintained
+F:	Documentation/networking/vortex.txt
+F:	drivers/net/3c59x.c
 
 3CR990 NETWORK DRIVER
 P:	David Dillow
 M:	dave@thedillows.org
 L:	netdev@vger.kernel.org
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/net/typhoon*
 
 3W-9XXX SATA-RAID CONTROLLER DRIVER
 P:	Adam Radford
@@ -109,6 +125,7 @@
 L:	linux-scsi@vger.kernel.org
 W:	http://www.amcc.com
 S:	Supported
+F:	drivers/scsi/3w-9xxx*
 
 3W-XXXX ATA-RAID CONTROLLER DRIVER
 P:	Adam Radford
@@ -116,35 +133,43 @@
 L:	linux-scsi@vger.kernel.org
 W:	http://www.amcc.com
 S:	Supported
+F:	drivers/scsi/3w-xxxx*
 
 53C700 AND 53C700-66 SCSI DRIVER
 P:	James E.J. Bottomley
 M:	James.Bottomley@HansenPartnership.com
 L:	linux-scsi@vger.kernel.org
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/scsi/53c700*
 
 6PACK NETWORK DRIVER FOR AX.25
 P:	Andreas Koensgen
 M:	ajk@iehk.rwth-aachen.de
 L:	linux-hams@vger.kernel.org
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/net/hamradio/6pack.c
 
 8169 10/100/1000 GIGABIT ETHERNET DRIVER
 P:	Francois Romieu
 M:	romieu@fr.zoreil.com
 L:	netdev@vger.kernel.org
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/net/r8169.c
 
 8250/16?50 (AND CLONE UARTS) SERIAL DRIVER
 L:	linux-serial@vger.kernel.org
 W:	http://serial.sourceforge.net
 S:	Orphan
+F:	drivers/serial/8250*
+F:	include/linux/serial_8250.h
 
 8390 NETWORK DRIVERS [WD80x3/SMC-ELITE, SMC-ULTRA, NE2000, 3C503, etc.]
 P:	Paul Gortmaker
 M:	p_gortmaker@yahoo.com
 L:	netdev@vger.kernel.org
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/net/*8390*
+F:	drivers/net/ax88796.c
 
 9P FILE SYSTEM
 P:	Eric Van Hensbergen
@@ -155,14 +180,17 @@
 M:	lucho@ionkov.net
 L:	v9fs-developer@lists.sourceforge.net
 W:	http://swik.net/v9fs
-T:	git kernel.org:/pub/scm/linux/kernel/ericvh/v9fs.git
+T:	git git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/ericvh/v9fs.git
 S:	Maintained
+F:	Documentation/filesystems/9p.txt
+F:	fs/9p/
 
 A2232 SERIAL BOARD DRIVER
 P:	Enver Haase
 M:	A2232@gmx.net
 L:	linux-m68k@lists.linux-m68k.org
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/char/ser_a2232*
 
 AACRAID SCSI RAID DRIVER
 P:	Adaptec OEM Raid Solutions
@@ -170,24 +198,29 @@
 L:	linux-scsi@vger.kernel.org
 W:	http://www.adaptec.com/
 S:	Supported
+F:	Documentation/scsi/aacraid.txt
+F:	drivers/scsi/aacraid/
 
 ABIT UGURU 1,2 HARDWARE MONITOR DRIVER
 P:	Hans de Goede
 M:	j.w.r.degoede@hhs.nl
 L:	lm-sensors@lm-sensors.org
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/hwmon/abituguru.c
 
 ABIT UGURU 3 HARDWARE MONITOR DRIVER
 P:	Alistair John Strachan
 M:	alistair@devzero.co.uk
 L:	lm-sensors@lm-sensors.org
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/hwmon/abituguru3.c
 
 ACENIC DRIVER
 P:	Jes Sorensen
 M:	jes@trained-monkey.org
 L:	linux-acenic@sunsite.dk
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/net/acenic*
 
 ACER WMI LAPTOP EXTRAS
 P:	Carlos Corbacho
@@ -195,14 +228,18 @@
 L:	aceracpi@googlegroups.com (subscribers-only)
 W:	http://code.google.com/p/aceracpi
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/platform/x86/acer-wmi.c
 
 ACPI
 P:	Len Brown
 M:	lenb@kernel.org
 L:	linux-acpi@vger.kernel.org
 W:	http://www.lesswatts.org/projects/acpi/
-T:	git kernel.org:/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/lenb/linux-acpi-2.6.git
+T:	git git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/lenb/linux-acpi-2.6.git
 S:	Supported
+F:	drivers/acpi/
+F:	drivers/pnp/pnpacpi/
+F:	include/linux/acpi.h
 
 ACPI BATTERY DRIVERS
 P:	Alexey Starikovskiy
@@ -210,6 +247,8 @@
 L:	linux-acpi@vger.kernel.org
 W:	http://www.lesswatts.org/projects/acpi/
 S:	Supported
+F:	drivers/acpi/battery.c
+F:	drivers/acpi/*sbs*
 
 ACPI EC DRIVER
 P:	Alexey Starikovskiy
@@ -217,6 +256,7 @@
 L:	linux-acpi@vger.kernel.org
 W:	http://www.lesswatts.org/projects/acpi/
 S:	Supported
+F:	drivers/acpi/ec.c
 
 ACPI FAN DRIVER
 P:	Zhang Rui
@@ -224,12 +264,14 @@
 L:	linux-acpi@vger.kernel.org
 W:	http://www.lesswatts.org/projects/acpi/
 S:	Supported
+F:	drivers/acpi/fan.c
 
 ACPI PCI HOTPLUG DRIVER
 P:	Kristen Carlson Accardi
 M:	kristen.c.accardi@intel.com
 L:	linux-pci@vger.kernel.org
 S:	Supported
+F:	drivers/pci/hotplug/acpi*
 
 ACPI THERMAL DRIVER
 P:	Zhang Rui
@@ -237,6 +279,7 @@
 L:	linux-acpi@vger.kernel.org
 W:	http://www.lesswatts.org/projects/acpi/
 S:	Supported
+F:	drivers/acpi/*thermal*
 
 ACPI VIDEO DRIVER
 P:	Zhang Rui
@@ -244,6 +287,7 @@
 L:	linux-acpi@vger.kernel.org
 W:	http://www.lesswatts.org/projects/acpi/
 S:	Supported
+F:	drivers/acpi/video.c
 
 ACPI WMI DRIVER
 P:	Carlos Corbacho
@@ -251,6 +295,7 @@
 L:	linux-acpi@vger.kernel.org
 W:	http://www.lesswatts.org/projects/acpi/
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/platform/x86/wmi.c
 
 AD1889 ALSA SOUND DRIVER
 P:	Kyle McMartin
@@ -260,77 +305,99 @@
 W:	http://wiki.parisc-linux.org/AD1889
 L:	linux-parisc@vger.kernel.org
 S:	Maintained
+F:	sound/pci/ad1889.*
 
 ADM1025 HARDWARE MONITOR DRIVER
 P:	Jean Delvare
 M:	khali@linux-fr.org
 L:	lm-sensors@lm-sensors.org
 S:	Maintained
+F:	Documentation/hwmon/adm1025
+F:	drivers/hwmon/adm1025.c
 
 ADM1029 HARDWARE MONITOR DRIVER
 P:	Corentin Labbe
 M:	corentin.labbe@geomatys.fr
 L:	lm-sensors@lm-sensors.org
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/hwmon/adm1029.c
 
 ADM8211 WIRELESS DRIVER
 P:	Michael Wu
 M:	flamingice@sourmilk.net
 L:	linux-wireless@vger.kernel.org
 W:	http://linuxwireless.org/
-T:	git kernel.org:/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/mwu/mac80211-drivers.git
+T:	git git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/mwu/mac80211-drivers.git
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/net/wireless/adm8211.*
 
 ADT746X FAN DRIVER
 P:	Colin Leroy
 M:	colin@colino.net
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/macintosh/therm_adt746x.c
 
 ADVANSYS SCSI DRIVER
 P:	Matthew Wilcox
 M:	matthew@wil.cx
 L:	linux-scsi@vger.kernel.org
 S:	Maintained
+F:	Documentation/scsi/advansys.txt
+F:	drivers/scsi/advansys.c
 
 AEDSP16 DRIVER
 P:	Riccardo Facchetti
 M:	fizban@tin.it
 S:	Maintained
+F:	sound/oss/aedsp16.c
 
 AFFS FILE SYSTEM
 P:	Roman Zippel
 M:	zippel@linux-m68k.org
 S:	Maintained
+F:	Documentation/filesystems/affs.txt
+F:	fs/affs/
 
 AFS FILESYSTEM & AF_RXRPC SOCKET DOMAIN
 P:	David Howells
 M:	dhowells@redhat.com
 L:	linux-afs@lists.infradead.org
 S:	Supported
+F:	fs/afs/
+F:	include/net/af_rxrpc.h
+F:	net/rxrpc/af_rxrpc.c
 
 AGPGART DRIVER
 P:	David Airlie
 M:	airlied@linux.ie
-T:	git kernel.org:/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/airlied/drm-2.6.git
+T:	git git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/airlied/drm-2.6.git
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/char/agp/
+F:	include/linux/agp*
 
 AHA152X SCSI DRIVER
 P:	Juergen E. Fischer
-M:	Juergen Fischer <fischer@norbit.de>
+M:	fischer@norbit.de
 L:	linux-scsi@vger.kernel.org
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/scsi/aha152x*
+F:	drivers/scsi/pcmcia/aha152x*
 
 AIC7XXX / AIC79XX SCSI DRIVER
 P:	Hannes Reinecke
 M:	hare@suse.de
 L:	linux-scsi@vger.kernel.org
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/
+F:	drivers/scsi/aic7xxx_old/
 
 AIO
 P:	Benjamin LaHaise
 M:	bcrl@kvack.org
 L:	linux-aio@kvack.org
 S:	Supported
+F:	fs/aio.c
+F:	include/linux/*aio*.h
 
 ALCATEL SPEEDTOUCH USB DRIVER
 P:	Duncan Sands
@@ -338,17 +405,22 @@
 L:	linux-usb@vger.kernel.org
 W:	http://www.linux-usb.org/SpeedTouch/
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/usb/atm/speedtch.c
+F:	drivers/usb/atm/usbatm.c
 
 ALCHEMY AU1XX0 MMC DRIVER
 P:	Manuel Lauss
 M:	manuel.lauss@gmail.com
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/mmc/host/au1xmmc.c
 
 ALI1563 I2C DRIVER
 P:	Rudolf Marek
 M:	r.marek@assembler.cz
 L:	linux-i2c@vger.kernel.org
 S:	Maintained
+F:	Documentation/i2c/busses/i2c-ali1563
+F:	drivers/i2c/busses/i2c-ali1563.c
 
 ALPHA PORT
 P:	Richard Henderson
@@ -358,31 +430,41 @@
 M:	ink@jurassic.park.msu.ru
 S:	Maintained for 2.4; PCI support for 2.6.
 L:	linux-alpha@vger.kernel.org
+F:	arch/alpha/
 
 AMD GEODE CS5536 USB DEVICE CONTROLLER DRIVER
 P:	Thomas Dahlmann
 M:	thomas.dahlmann@amd.com
 L:	linux-geode@lists.infradead.org (moderated for non-subscribers)
 S:	Supported
+F:	drivers/usb/gadget/amd5536udc.*
 
 AMD GEODE PROCESSOR/CHIPSET SUPPORT
 P:	Jordan Crouse
 L:	linux-geode@lists.infradead.org (moderated for non-subscribers)
 W:	http://www.amd.com/us-en/ConnectivitySolutions/TechnicalResources/0,,50_2334_2452_11363,00.html
 S:	Supported
+F:	arch/x86/kernel/geode_32.c
+F:	drivers/char/hw_random/geode-rng.c
+F:	drivers/crypto/geode*
+F:	drivers/video/geode/
+F:	arch/x86/include/asm/geode.h
 
 AMD IOMMU (AMD-VI)
 P:	Joerg Roedel
 M:	joerg.roedel@amd.com
 L:	iommu@lists.linux-foundation.org
-T:	git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/joro/linux-2.6-iommu.git
+T:	git git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/joro/linux-2.6-iommu.git
 S:	Supported
+F:	arch/x86/kernel/amd_iommu*.c
+F:	arch/x86/include/asm/amd_iommu*.h
 
 AMD MICROCODE UPDATE SUPPORT
-P:      Andreas Herrmann
-M:      andeas.herrmann3@amd.com
-L:      amd64-microcode@amd64.org
-S:      Supported
+P:	Andreas Herrmann
+M:	andreas.herrmann3@amd.com
+L:	amd64-microcode@amd64.org
+S:	Supported
+F:	arch/x86/kernel/microcode_amd.c
 
 AMS (Apple Motion Sensor) DRIVER
 P:	Stelian Pop
@@ -390,6 +472,7 @@
 P:	Michael Hanselmann
 M:	linux-kernel@hansmi.ch
 S:	Supported
+F:	drivers/hwmon/ams/
 
 AMSO1100 RNIC DRIVER
 P:	Tom Tucker
@@ -398,6 +481,7 @@
 M:	swise@opengridcomputing.com
 L:	general@lists.openfabrics.org
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/infiniband/hw/amso1100/
 
 AOA (Apple Onboard Audio) ALSA DRIVER
 P:	Johannes Berg
@@ -405,6 +489,7 @@
 L:	linuxppc-dev@ozlabs.org
 L:	alsa-devel@alsa-project.org (subscribers-only)
 S:	Maintained
+F:	sound/aoa/
 
 APM DRIVER
 P:	Stephen Rothwell
@@ -412,48 +497,63 @@
 L:	linux-laptop@vger.kernel.org
 W:	http://www.canb.auug.org.au/~sfr/
 S:	Supported
+F:	arch/x86/kernel/apm_32.c
+F:	include/linux/apm_bios.h
 
 APPLE BCM5974 MULTITOUCH DRIVER
 P:	Henrik Rydberg
 M:	rydberg@euromail.se
 L:	linux-input@vger.kernel.org
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/input/mouse/bcm5974.c
 
 APPLE SMC DRIVER
 P:	Nicolas Boichat
 M:	nicolas@boichat.ch
 L:	mactel-linux-devel@lists.sourceforge.net
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/hwmon/applesmc.c
 
 APPLETALK NETWORK LAYER
 P:	Arnaldo Carvalho de Melo
 M:	acme@ghostprotocols.net
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/net/appletalk/
+F:	net/appletalk/
 
 APPLETOUCH TOUCHPAD DRIVER
 P:	Johannes Berg
 M:	johannes@sipsolutions.net
 L:	linux-input@vger.kernel.org
 S:	Maintained
+F:	Documentation/input/appletouch.txt
+F:	drivers/input/mouse/appletouch.c
 
 ARC FRAMEBUFFER DRIVER
 P:	Jaya Kumar
 M:	jayalk@intworks.biz
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/video/arcfb.c
+F:	drivers/video/fb_defio.c
 
 ARM MFM AND FLOPPY DRIVERS
 P:	Ian Molton
 M:	spyro@f2s.com
 S:	Maintained
+F:	arch/arm/lib/floppydma.S
+F:	arch/arm/include/asm/floppy.h
 
 ARM PRIMECELL MMCI PL180/1 DRIVER
 S:	Orphan
+F:	drivers/mmc/host/mmci.*
 
 ARM/ADI ROADRUNNER MACHINE SUPPORT
 P:	Lennert Buytenhek
 M:	kernel@wantstofly.org
 L:	linux-arm-kernel@lists.arm.linux.org.uk (subscribers-only)
 S:	Maintained
+F:	arch/arm/mach-ixp23xx/
+F:	arch/arm/mach-ixp23xx/include/mach/
 
 ARM/ADS SPHERE MACHINE SUPPORT
 P:	Lennert Buytenhek
@@ -507,7 +607,7 @@
 P:	Paulius Zaleckas
 M:	paulius.zaleckas@teltonika.lt
 L:	linux-arm-kernel@lists.arm.linux.org.uk (subscribers-only)
-T:	git gitorious.org/linux-gemini/mainline.git
+T:	git git://gitorious.org/linux-gemini/mainline.git
 S:	Maintained
 
 ARM/EZX SMARTPHONES (A780, A910, A1200, E680, ROKR E2 and ROKR E6)
@@ -636,17 +736,17 @@
 M:	dirk@opfer-online.de
 S:	Maintained
 
-ARM/PALMTX,PALMT5,PALMLD SUPPORT
+ARM/PALMTX,PALMT5,PALMLD,PALMTE2 SUPPORT
 P:	Marek Vasut
 M:	marek.vasut@gmail.com
 W:	http://hackndev.com
 S:	Maintained
 
 ARM/PALMZ72 SUPPORT
-P:     Sergey Lapin
-M:     slapin@ossfans.org
-W:     http://hackndev.com
-S:     Maintained
+P:	Sergey Lapin
+M:	slapin@ossfans.org
+W:	http://hackndev.com
+S:	Maintained
 
 ARM/PLEB SUPPORT
 P:	Peter Chubb
@@ -707,16 +807,17 @@
 S:	Maintained
 
 ARM/NUVOTON W90X900 ARM ARCHITECTURE
-P:      Wan ZongShun
-M:      mcuos.com@gmail.com
-L:      linux-arm-kernel@lists.arm.linux.org.uk (subscribers-only)
-W:      http://www.mcuos.com
-S:      Maintained
+P:	Wan ZongShun
+M:	mcuos.com@gmail.com
+L:	linux-arm-kernel@lists.arm.linux.org.uk (subscribers-only)
+W:	http://www.mcuos.com
+S:	Maintained
 
 ARPD SUPPORT
 P:	Jonathan Layes
 L:	netdev@vger.kernel.org
 S:	Maintained
+F:	net/ipv4/arp.c
 
 ASUS ACPI EXTRAS DRIVER
 P:	Corentin Chary
@@ -727,12 +828,15 @@
 W:	http://sourceforge.net/projects/acpi4asus
 W:	http://xf.iksaif.net/acpi4asus
 S:	Maintained
+F:	arch/x86/kernel/acpi/boot.c
+F:	drivers/platform/x86/asus_acpi.c
 
 ASUS ASB100 HARDWARE MONITOR DRIVER
 P:	Mark M. Hoffman
 M:	mhoffman@lightlink.com
 L:	lm-sensors@lm-sensors.org
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/hwmon/asb100.c
 
 ASUS LAPTOP EXTRAS DRIVER
 P:	Corentin Chary
@@ -741,6 +845,7 @@
 W:	http://sourceforge.net/projects/acpi4asus
 W:	http://xf.iksaif.net/acpi4asus
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/platform/x86/asus-laptop.c
 
 ASYNCHRONOUS TRANSFERS/TRANSFORMS (IOAT) API
 P:	Dan Williams
@@ -750,12 +855,19 @@
 L:	linux-kernel@vger.kernel.org
 W:	http://sourceforge.net/projects/xscaleiop
 S:	Supported
+F:	Documentation/crypto/async-tx-api.txt
+F:	crypto/async_tx/
+F:	drivers/dma/
+F:	include/linux/dmaengine.h
+F:	include/linux/async_tx.h
 
 ATA OVER ETHERNET (AOE) DRIVER
 P:	Ed L. Cashin
 M:	ecashin@coraid.com
 W:	http://www.coraid.com/support/linux
 S:	Supported
+F:	Documentation/aoe/
+F:	drivers/block/aoe/
 
 ATHEROS ATH5K WIRELESS DRIVER
 P:	Jiri Slaby
@@ -769,6 +881,7 @@
 L:	linux-wireless@vger.kernel.org
 L:	ath5k-devel@lists.ath5k.org
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/net/wireless/ath5k/
 
 ATHEROS ATH9K WIRELESS DRIVER
 P:	Luis R. Rodriguez
@@ -778,6 +891,7 @@
 L:	linux-wireless@vger.kernel.org
 L:	ath9k-devel@lists.ath9k.org
 S:	Supported
+F:	drivers/net/wireless/ath9k/
 
 ATHEROS AR9170 WIRELESS DRIVER
 P:	Christian Lamparter
@@ -791,6 +905,7 @@
 P:	Ville Syrjala
 M:	syrjala@sci.fi
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/input/misc/ati_remote2.c
 
 ATLX ETHERNET DRIVERS
 P:	Jay Cliburn
@@ -803,6 +918,7 @@
 W:	http://sourceforge.net/projects/atl1
 W:	http://atl1.sourceforge.net
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/net/atlx/
 
 ATM
 P:	Chas Williams
@@ -811,6 +927,8 @@
 L:	netdev@vger.kernel.org
 W:	http://linux-atm.sourceforge.net
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/atm/
+F:	include/linux/atm*
 
 ATMEL AT91 MCI DRIVER
 P:	Nicolas Ferre
@@ -819,28 +937,34 @@
 W:	http://www.atmel.com/products/AT91/
 W:	http://www.at91.com/
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/mmc/host/at91_mci.c
 
 ATMEL AT91 / AT32 SERIAL DRIVER
 P:	Haavard Skinnemoen
 M:	hskinnemoen@atmel.com
 L:	linux-kernel@vger.kernel.org
 S:	Supported
+F:	drivers/serial/atmel_serial.c
 
 ATMEL LCDFB DRIVER
 P:	Nicolas Ferre
 M:	nicolas.ferre@atmel.com
 L:	linux-fbdev-devel@lists.sourceforge.net (moderated for non-subscribers)
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/video/atmel_lcdfb.c
+F:	include/video/atmel_lcdc.h
 
 ATMEL MACB ETHERNET DRIVER
 P:	Haavard Skinnemoen
 M:	hskinnemoen@atmel.com
 S:	Supported
+F:	drivers/net/macb.*
 
 ATMEL SPI DRIVER
 P:	Haavard Skinnemoen
 M:	hskinnemoen@atmel.com
 S:	Supported
+F:	drivers/spi/atmel_spi.*
 
 ATMEL USBA UDC DRIVER
 P:	Haavard Skinnemoen
@@ -848,6 +972,7 @@
 L:	kernel@avr32linux.org
 W:	http://avr32linux.org/twiki/bin/view/Main/AtmelUsbDeviceDriver
 S:	Supported
+F:	drivers/usb/gadget/atmel_usba_udc.*
 
 ATMEL WIRELESS DRIVER
 P:	Simon Kelley
@@ -856,6 +981,7 @@
 W:	http://www.thekelleys.org.uk/atmel
 W:	http://atmelwlandriver.sourceforge.net/
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/net/wireless/atmel*
 
 AUDIT SUBSYSTEM
 P:	Al Viro
@@ -864,8 +990,10 @@
 M:	eparis@redhat.com
 L:	linux-audit@redhat.com (subscribers-only)
 W:	http://people.redhat.com/sgrubb/audit/
-T:	git git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/viro/audit-current.git
+T:	git git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/viro/audit-current.git
 S:	Maintained
+F:	include/linux/audit.h
+F:	kernel/audit*
 
 AUXILIARY DISPLAY DRIVERS
 P:	Miguel Ojeda Sandonis
@@ -874,6 +1002,8 @@
 W:	http://miguelojeda.es/auxdisplay.htm
 W:	http://jair.lab.fi.uva.es/~migojed/auxdisplay.htm
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/auxdisplay/
+F:	include/linux/cfag12864b.h
 
 AVR32 ARCHITECTURE
 P:	Haavard Skinnemoen
@@ -882,11 +1012,13 @@
 W:	http://avr32linux.org/
 W:	http://avrfreaks.net/
 S:	Supported
+F:	arch/avr32/
 
 AVR32/AT32AP MACHINE SUPPORT
 P:	Haavard Skinnemoen
 M:	hskinnemoen@atmel.com
 S:	Supported
+F:	arch/avr32/mach-at32ap/
 
 AX.25 NETWORK LAYER
 P:	Ralf Baechle
@@ -894,6 +1026,9 @@
 L:	linux-hams@vger.kernel.org
 W:	http://www.linux-ax25.org/
 S:	Maintained
+F:	include/linux/ax25.h
+F:	include/net/ax25.h
+F:	net/ax25/
 
 B43 WIRELESS DRIVER
 P:	Michael Buesch
@@ -903,6 +1038,7 @@
 L:	linux-wireless@vger.kernel.org
 W:	http://linuxwireless.org/en/users/Drivers/b43
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/net/wireless/b43/
 
 B43LEGACY WIRELESS DRIVER
 P:	Larry Finger
@@ -912,11 +1048,14 @@
 L:	linux-wireless@vger.kernel.org
 W:	http://linuxwireless.org/en/users/Drivers/b43
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/net/wireless/b43legacy/
 
 BACKLIGHT CLASS/SUBSYSTEM
 P:	Richard Purdie
 M:	rpurdie@rpsys.net
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/video/backlight/
+F:	include/linux/backlight.h
 
 BAYCOM/HDLCDRV DRIVERS FOR AX.25
 P:	Thomas Sailer
@@ -924,18 +1063,24 @@
 L:	linux-hams@vger.kernel.org
 W:	http://www.baycom.org/~tom/ham/ham.html
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/net/hamradio/baycom*
 
 BEFS FILE SYSTEM
 P:	Sergey S. Kostyliov
 M:	rathamahata@php4.ru
 L:	linux-kernel@vger.kernel.org
 S:	Maintained
+F:	Documentation/filesystems/befs.txt
+F:	fs/befs/
 
 BFS FILE SYSTEM
 P:	Tigran A. Aivazian
 M:	tigran@aivazian.fsnet.co.uk
 L:	linux-kernel@vger.kernel.org
 S:	Maintained
+F:	Documentation/filesystems/bfs.txt
+F:	fs/bfs/
+F:	include/linux/bfs_fs.h
 
 BLACKFIN ARCHITECTURE
 P:	Bryan Wu
@@ -943,6 +1088,7 @@
 L:	uclinux-dist-devel@blackfin.uclinux.org
 W:	http://blackfin.uclinux.org
 S:	Supported
+F:	arch/blackfin/
 
 BLACKFIN EMAC DRIVER
 P:	Bryan Wu
@@ -950,6 +1096,7 @@
 L:	uclinux-dist-devel@blackfin.uclinux.org (subscribers-only)
 W:	http://blackfin.uclinux.org
 S:	Supported
+F:	drivers/net/bfin_mac.*
 
 BLACKFIN RTC DRIVER
 P:	Mike Frysinger
@@ -957,6 +1104,7 @@
 L:	uclinux-dist-devel@blackfin.uclinux.org (subscribers-only)
 W:	http://blackfin.uclinux.org
 S:	Supported
+F:	drivers/rtc/rtc-bfin.c
 
 BLACKFIN SERIAL DRIVER
 P:	Sonic Zhang
@@ -964,6 +1112,7 @@
 L:	uclinux-dist-devel@blackfin.uclinux.org (subscribers-only)
 W:	http://blackfin.uclinux.org
 S:	Supported
+F:	drivers/serial/bfin_5xx.c
 
 BLACKFIN WATCHDOG DRIVER
 P:	Mike Frysinger
@@ -971,6 +1120,7 @@
 L:	uclinux-dist-devel@blackfin.uclinux.org (subscribers-only)
 W:	http://blackfin.uclinux.org
 S:	Supported
+F:	drivers/watchdog/bfin_wdt.c
 
 BLACKFIN I2C TWI DRIVER
 P:	Sonic Zhang
@@ -978,19 +1128,22 @@
 L:	uclinux-dist-devel@blackfin.uclinux.org (subscribers-only)
 W:	http://blackfin.uclinux.org/
 S:	Supported
+F:	drivers/i2c/busses/i2c-bfin-twi.c
 
 BLOCK LAYER
 P:	Jens Axboe
 M:	axboe@kernel.dk
 L:	linux-kernel@vger.kernel.org
-T:	git kernel.org:/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/axboe/linux-2.6-block.git
+T:	git git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/axboe/linux-2.6-block.git
 S:	Maintained
+F:	block/
 
 BLOCK2MTD DRIVER
 P:	Joern Engel
 M:	joern@lazybastard.org
 L:	linux-mtd@lists.infradead.org
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/mtd/devices/block2mtd.c
 
 BLUETOOTH DRIVERS
 P:	Marcel Holtmann
@@ -998,14 +1151,17 @@
 L:	linux-bluetooth@vger.kernel.org
 W:	http://www.bluez.org/
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/bluetooth/
 
 BLUETOOTH SUBSYSTEM
 P:	Marcel Holtmann
 M:	marcel@holtmann.org
 L:	linux-bluetooth@vger.kernel.org
 W:	http://www.bluez.org/
-T:	git kernel.org:/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/holtmann/bluetooth-2.6.git
+T:	git git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/holtmann/bluetooth-2.6.git
 S:	Maintained
+F:	net/bluetooth/
+F:	include/net/bluetooth/
 
 BONDING DRIVER
 P:	Jay Vosburgh
@@ -1013,24 +1169,30 @@
 L:	bonding-devel@lists.sourceforge.net
 W:	http://sourceforge.net/projects/bonding/
 S:	Supported
+F:	drivers/net/bonding/
+F:	include/linux/if_bonding.h
 
 BROADCOM B44 10/100 ETHERNET DRIVER
 P:	Gary Zambrano
 M:	zambrano@broadcom.com
 L:	netdev@vger.kernel.org
 S:	Supported
+F:	drivers/net/b44.*
 
 BROADCOM BNX2 GIGABIT ETHERNET DRIVER
 P:	Michael Chan
 M:	mchan@broadcom.com
 L:	netdev@vger.kernel.org
 S:	Supported
+F:	drivers/net/bnx2.*
+F:	drivers/net/bnx2_*
 
 BROADCOM BNX2X 10 GIGABIT ETHERNET DRIVER
 P:	Eilon Greenstein
 M:	eilong@broadcom.com
 L:	netdev@vger.kernel.org
 S:	Supported
+F:	drivers/net/bnx2x*
 
 BROADCOM TG3 GIGABIT ETHERNET DRIVER
 P:	Matt Carlson
@@ -1039,41 +1201,51 @@
 M:	mchan@broadcom.com
 L:	netdev@vger.kernel.org
 S:	Supported
+F:	drivers/net/tg3.*
 
 BSG (block layer generic sg v4 driver)
 P:	FUJITA Tomonori
 M:	fujita.tomonori@lab.ntt.co.jp
 L:	linux-scsi@vger.kernel.org
 S:	Supported
+F:	block/bsg.c
+F:	include/linux/bsg.h
 
 BT8XXGPIO DRIVER
 P:	Michael Buesch
 M:	mb@bu3sch.de
 W:	http://bu3sch.de/btgpio.php
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/gpio/bt8xxgpio.c
 
 BTRFS FILE SYSTEM
 P:	Chris Mason
 M:	chris.mason@oracle.com
 L:	linux-btrfs@vger.kernel.org
 W:	http://btrfs.wiki.kernel.org/
-T:	git kernel.org:/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/mason/btrfs-unstable.git
+T:	git git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/mason/btrfs-unstable.git
 S:	Maintained
+F:	Documentation/filesystems/btrfs.txt
+F:	fs/btrfs/
 
 BTTV VIDEO4LINUX DRIVER
 P:	Mauro Carvalho Chehab
 M:	mchehab@infradead.org
 L:	linux-media@vger.kernel.org
 W:	http://linuxtv.org
-T:	git kernel.org:/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/mchehab/linux-2.6.git
+T:	git git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/mchehab/linux-2.6.git
 S:	Maintained
+F:	Documentation/video4linux/bttv/
+F:	drivers/media/video/bt8xx/bttv*
 
 CAFE CMOS INTEGRATED CAMERA CONTROLLER DRIVER
 P:	Jonathan Corbet
 M:	corbet@lwn.net
 L:	linux-media@vger.kernel.org
-T:	git kernel.org:/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/mchehab/linux-2.6.git
+T:	git git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/mchehab/linux-2.6.git
 S:	Maintained
+F:	Documentation/video4linux/cafe_ccic
+F:	drivers/media/video/cafe_ccic*
 
 CALGARY x86-64 IOMMU
 P:	Muli Ben-Yehuda
@@ -1083,6 +1255,10 @@
 L:	linux-kernel@vger.kernel.org
 L:	discuss@x86-64.org
 S:	Maintained
+F:	arch/x86/kernel/pci-calgary_64.c
+F:	arch/x86/kernel/tce_64.c
+F:	arch/x86/include/asm/calgary.h
+F:	arch/x86/include/asm/tce.h
 
 CAN NETWORK LAYER
 P:	Urs Thuermann
@@ -1092,6 +1268,9 @@
 L:	socketcan-core@lists.berlios.de (subscribers-only)
 W:	http://developer.berlios.de/projects/socketcan/
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/net/can/
+F:	include/linux/can/
+F:	include/linux/can.h
 
 CELL BROADBAND ENGINE ARCHITECTURE
 P:	Arnd Bergmann
@@ -1100,12 +1279,23 @@
 L:	cbe-oss-dev@ozlabs.org
 W:	http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/power/cell/
 S:	Supported
+F:	arch/powerpc/include/asm/cell*.h
+F:	arch/powerpc/include/asm/lv1call.h
+F:	arch/powerpc/include/asm/ps3*.h
+F:	arch/powerpc/include/asm/spu*.h
+F:	arch/powerpc/oprofile/*cell*
+F:	arch/powerpc/platforms/cell/
+F:	arch/powerpc/platforms/ps3/
 
 CERTIFIED WIRELESS USB (WUSB) SUBSYSTEM:
 P:	David Vrabel
 M:	david.vrabel@csr.com
 L:	linux-usb@vger.kernel.org
 S:	Supported
+F:	Documentation/usb/WUSB-Design-overview.txt
+F:	Documentation/usb/wusb-cbaf
+F:	drivers/usb/wusbcore/
+F:	include/linux/usb/wusb*
 
 CFAG12864B LCD DRIVER
 P:	Miguel Ojeda Sandonis
@@ -1114,6 +1304,8 @@
 W:	http://miguelojeda.es/auxdisplay.htm
 W:	http://jair.lab.fi.uva.es/~migojed/auxdisplay.htm
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/auxdisplay/cfag12864b.c
+F:	include/linux/cfag12864b.h
 
 CFAG12864BFB LCD FRAMEBUFFER DRIVER
 P:	Miguel Ojeda Sandonis
@@ -1122,18 +1314,25 @@
 W:	http://miguelojeda.es/auxdisplay.htm
 W:	http://jair.lab.fi.uva.es/~migojed/auxdisplay.htm
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/auxdisplay/cfag12864bfb.c
+F:	include/linux/cfag12864b.h
 
 CFG80211 and NL80211
 P:	Johannes Berg
 M:	johannes@sipsolutions.net
 L:	linux-wireless@vger.kernel.org
 S:	Maintained
+F:	include/linux/nl80211.h
+F:	include/net/cfg80211.h
+F:	net/wireless/*
+X:	net/wireless/wext*
 
 CHECKPATCH
 P:	Andy Whitcroft
 M:	apw@canonical.com
 L:	linux-kernel@vger.kernel.org
 S:	Supported
+F:	scripts/checkpatch.pl
 
 CISCO 10G ETHERNET DRIVER
 P:	Scott Feldman
@@ -1141,24 +1340,28 @@
 P:	Joe Eykholt
 M:	jeykholt@cisco.com
 S:	Supported
+F:	drivers/net/enic/
 
 CIRRUS LOGIC EP93XX ETHERNET DRIVER
 P:	Lennert Buytenhek
 M:	kernel@wantstofly.org
 L:	netdev@vger.kernel.org
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/net/arm/ep93xx_eth.c
 
 CIRRUS LOGIC EP93XX OHCI USB HOST DRIVER
 P:	Lennert Buytenhek
 M:	kernel@wantstofly.org
 L:	linux-usb@vger.kernel.org
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/usb/host/ohci-ep93xx.c
 
 CIRRUS LOGIC CS4270 SOUND DRIVER
 P:	Timur Tabi
 M:	timur@freescale.com
 L:	alsa-devel@alsa-project.org
 S:	Supported
+F:	sound/soc/codecs/cs4270*
 
 CIRRUS LOGIC CS4280/CS461x SOUNDDRIVER
 P:	Cirrus Logic Corporation (kernel 2.2 driver)
@@ -1166,6 +1369,8 @@
 P:	Nils Faerber (port to kernel 2.4)
 M:	Nils Faerber <nils@kernelconcepts.de>
 S:	Maintained
+F:	Documentation/input/cs461x.txt
+F:	sound/pci/cs46xx/
 
 CODA FILE SYSTEM
 P:	Jan Harkes
@@ -1174,6 +1379,9 @@
 L:	codalist@coda.cs.cmu.edu
 W:	http://www.coda.cs.cmu.edu/
 S:	Maintained
+F:	Documentation/filesystems/coda.txt
+F:	fs/coda/
+F:	include/linux/coda*.h
 
 COMMON INTERNET FILE SYSTEM (CIFS)
 P:	Steve French
@@ -1181,8 +1389,10 @@
 L:	linux-cifs-client@lists.samba.org
 L:	samba-technical@lists.samba.org
 W:	http://linux-cifs.samba.org/
-T:	git kernel.org:/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/sfrench/cifs-2.6.git
+T:	git git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/sfrench/cifs-2.6.git
 S:	Supported
+F:	Documentation/filesystems/cifs.txt
+F:	fs/cifs/
 
 COMPACTPCI HOTPLUG CORE
 P:	Scott Murray
@@ -1190,6 +1400,7 @@
 M:	scott@spiteful.org
 L:	linux-pci@vger.kernel.org
 S:	Supported
+F:	drivers/pci/hotplug/cpci_hotplug*
 
 COMPACTPCI HOTPLUG ZIATECH ZT5550 DRIVER
 P:	Scott Murray
@@ -1197,6 +1408,7 @@
 M:	scott@spiteful.org
 L:	linux-pci@vger.kernel.org
 S:	Supported
+F:	drivers/pci/hotplug/cpcihp_zt5550.*
 
 COMPACTPCI HOTPLUG GENERIC DRIVER
 P:	Scott Murray
@@ -1204,17 +1416,21 @@
 M:	scott@spiteful.org
 L:	linux-pci@vger.kernel.org
 S:	Supported
+F:	drivers/pci/hotplug/cpcihp_generic.c
 
 COMPAL LAPTOP SUPPORT
 P:	Cezary Jackiewicz
 M:	cezary.jackiewicz@gmail.com
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/platform/x86/compal-laptop.c
 
 COMPUTONE INTELLIPORT MULTIPORT CARD
 P:	Michael H. Warfield
 M:	mhw@wittsend.com
 W:	http://www.wittsend.com/computone.html
 S:	Maintained
+F:	Documentation/serial/computone.txt
+F:	drivers/char/ip2/
 
 CONEXANT ACCESSRUNNER USB DRIVER
 P:	Simon Arlott
@@ -1222,12 +1438,15 @@
 L:	accessrunner-general@lists.sourceforge.net
 W:	http://accessrunner.sourceforge.net/
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/usb/atm/cxacru.c
 
 CONFIGFS
 P:	Joel Becker
 M:	joel.becker@oracle.com
 L:	linux-kernel@vger.kernel.org
 S:	Supported
+F:	fs/configfs/
+F:	include/linux/configfs.h
 
 CONTROL GROUPS (CGROUPS)
 P:	Paul Menage
@@ -1236,31 +1455,41 @@
 M:	lizf@cn.fujitsu.com
 L:	containers@lists.linux-foundation.org
 S:	Maintained
+F:	include/linux/cgroup*
+F:	kernel/cgroup*
 
 CORETEMP HARDWARE MONITORING DRIVER
 P:	Rudolf Marek
 M:	r.marek@assembler.cz
 L:	lm-sensors@lm-sensors.org
 S:	Maintained
+F:	Documentation/hwmon/coretemp
+F:	drivers/hwmon/coretemp.c
 
 COSA/SRP SYNC SERIAL DRIVER
 P:	Jan "Yenya" Kasprzak
 M:	kas@fi.muni.cz
 W:	http://www.fi.muni.cz/~kas/cosa/
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/net/wan/cosa*
 
 CPU FREQUENCY DRIVERS
 P:	Dave Jones
 M:	davej@redhat.com
 L:	cpufreq@vger.kernel.org
 W:	http://www.codemonkey.org.uk/projects/cpufreq/
-T:	git kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/davej/cpufreq.git
+T:	git git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/davej/cpufreq.git
 S:	Maintained
+F:	arch/x86/kernel/cpu/cpufreq/
+F:	drivers/cpufreq/
+F:	include/linux/cpufreq.h
 
 CPUID/MSR DRIVER
 P:	H. Peter Anvin
 M:	hpa@zytor.com
 S:	Maintained
+F:	arch/x86/kernel/cpuid.c
+F:	arch/x86/kernel/msr.c
 
 CPUSETS
 P:	Paul Menage
@@ -1269,10 +1498,15 @@
 W:	http://www.bullopensource.org/cpuset/
 W:	http://oss.sgi.com/projects/cpusets/
 S:	Supported
+F:	Documentation/cgroups/cpusets.txt
+F:	include/linux/cpuset.h
+F:	kernel/cpuset.c
 
 CRAMFS FILESYSTEM
 W:	http://sourceforge.net/projects/cramfs/
 S:	Orphan
+F:	Documentation/filesystems/cramfs.txt
+F:	fs/cramfs/
 
 CRIS PORT
 P:	Mikael Starvik
@@ -1282,6 +1516,7 @@
 L:	dev-etrax@axis.com
 W:	http://developer.axis.com
 S:	Maintained
+F:	arch/cris/
 
 CRYPTO API
 P:	Herbert Xu
@@ -1289,8 +1524,13 @@
 P:	David S. Miller
 M:	davem@davemloft.net
 L:	linux-crypto@vger.kernel.org
-T:	git kernel.org:/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/herbert/crypto-2.6.git
+T:	git git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/herbert/crypto-2.6.git
 S:	Maintained
+F:	Documentation/crypto/
+F:	arch/*/crypto/
+F:	crypto/
+F:	drivers/crypto/
+F:	include/crypto/
 
 CRYPTOGRAPHIC RANDOM NUMBER GENERATOR
 P:	Neil Horman
@@ -1302,16 +1542,21 @@
 P:	Jaya Kumar
 M:	jayakumar.alsa@gmail.com
 S:	Maintained
+F:	sound/pci/cs5535audio/
 
 CX18 VIDEO4LINUX DRIVER
-P:	Hans Verkuil, Andy Walls
-M:	hverkuil@xs4all.nl, awalls@radix.net
+P:	Hans Verkuil
+M:	hverkuil@xs4all.nl
+P:	Andy Walls
+M:	awalls@radix.net
 L:	ivtv-devel@ivtvdriver.org
 L:	ivtv-users@ivtvdriver.org
 L:	linux-media@vger.kernel.org
-T:	git kernel.org:/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/mchehab/linux-2.6.git
+T:	git git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/mchehab/linux-2.6.git
 W:	http://linuxtv.org
 S:	Maintained
+F:	Documentation/video4linux/cx18.txt
+F:	drivers/media/video/cx18/
 
 CXGB3 ETHERNET DRIVER (CXGB3)
 P:	Divy Le Ray
@@ -1319,6 +1564,7 @@
 L:	netdev@vger.kernel.org
 W:	http://www.chelsio.com
 S:	Supported
+F:	drivers/net/cxgb3/
 
 CXGB3 IWARP RNIC DRIVER (IW_CXGB3)
 P:	Steve Wise
@@ -1326,32 +1572,32 @@
 L:	general@lists.openfabrics.org
 W:	http://www.openfabrics.org
 S:	Supported
+F:	drivers/infiniband/hw/cxgb3/
 
 CYBERPRO FB DRIVER
 P:	Russell King
 M:	rmk@arm.linux.org.uk
 W:	http://www.arm.linux.org.uk/
 S:	Maintained
-
-CYBLAFB FRAMEBUFFER DRIVER
-P:	Knut Petersen
-M:	Knut_Petersen@t-online.de
-L:	linux-fbdev-devel@lists.sourceforge.net (moderated for non-subscribers)
-S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/video/cyber2000fb.*
 
 CYCLADES 2X SYNC CARD DRIVER
 P:	Arnaldo Carvalho de Melo
 M:	acme@ghostprotocols.net
 W:	http://oops.ghostprotocols.net:81/blog
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/net/wan/cycx*
 
 CYCLADES ASYNC MUX DRIVER
 W:	http://www.cyclades.com/
 S:	Orphan
+F:	drivers/char/cyclades.c
+F:	include/linux/cyclades.h
 
 CYCLADES PC300 DRIVER
 W:	http://www.cyclades.com/
 S:	Orphan
+F:	drivers/net/wan/pc300*
 
 DAMA SLAVE for AX.25
 P:	Joerg Reuter
@@ -1360,12 +1606,21 @@
 W:	http://www.qsl.net/dl1bke/
 L:	linux-hams@vger.kernel.org
 S:	Maintained
+F:	net/ax25/af_ax25.c
+F:	net/ax25/ax25_dev.c
+F:	net/ax25/ax25_ds_*
+F:	net/ax25/ax25_in.c
+F:	net/ax25/ax25_out.c
+F:	net/ax25/ax25_timer.c
+F:	net/ax25/sysctl_net_ax25.c
 
 DAVICOM FAST ETHERNET (DMFE) NETWORK DRIVER
 P:	Tobias Ringstrom
 M:	tori@unhappy.mine.nu
 L:	netdev@vger.kernel.org
 S:	Maintained
+F:	Documentation/networking/dmfe.txt
+F:	drivers/net/tulip/dmfe.c
 
 DC390/AM53C974 SCSI driver
 P:	Kurt Garloff
@@ -1374,6 +1629,7 @@
 P:	Guennadi Liakhovetski
 M:	g.liakhovetski@gmx.de
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/scsi/tmscsim.*
 
 DC395x SCSI driver
 P:	Oliver Neukum
@@ -1386,6 +1642,8 @@
 L:	dc395x@twibble.org
 L:	http://lists.twibble.org/mailman/listinfo/dc395x/
 S:	Maintained
+F:	Documentation/scsi/dc395x.txt
+F:	drivers/scsi/dc395x.*
 
 DCCP PROTOCOL
 P:	Arnaldo Carvalho de Melo
@@ -1393,6 +1651,9 @@
 L:	dccp@vger.kernel.org
 W:	http://linux-net.osdl.org/index.php/DCCP
 S:	Maintained
+F:	include/linux/dccp.h
+F:	include/linux/tfrc.h
+F:	net/dccp/
 
 DECnet NETWORK LAYER
 P:	Christine Caulfield
@@ -1400,27 +1661,40 @@
 W:	http://linux-decnet.sourceforge.net
 L:	linux-decnet-user@lists.sourceforge.net
 S:	Maintained
+F:	Documentation/networking/decnet.txt
+F:	net/decnet/
 
 DEFXX FDDI NETWORK DRIVER
 P:	Maciej W. Rozycki
 M:	macro@linux-mips.org
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/net/defxx.*
 
 DELL LAPTOP DRIVER
 P:	Matthew Garrett
 M:	mjg59@srcf.ucam.org
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/platform/x86/dell-laptop.c
 
 DELL LAPTOP SMM DRIVER
 P:	Massimo Dal Zotto
 M:	dz@debian.org
 W:	http://www.debian.org/~dz/i8k/
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/char/i8k.c
+F:	include/linux/i8k.h
 
 DELL SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT BASE DRIVER (dcdbas)
 P:	Doug Warzecha
 M:	Douglas_Warzecha@dell.com
 S:	Maintained
+F:	Documentation/dcdbas.txt
+F:	drivers/firmware/dcdbas.*
+
+DELL WMI EXTRAS DRIVER
+P:	Matthew Garrett
+M:	mjg59@srcf.ucam.org
+S:	Maintained
 
 DEVICE NUMBER REGISTRY
 P:	Torben Mathiasen
@@ -1434,6 +1708,10 @@
 L:	dm-devel@redhat.com
 W:	http://sources.redhat.com/dm
 S:	Maintained
+F:	Documentation/device-mapper/
+F:	drivers/md/dm*
+F:	include/linux/device-mapper.h
+F:	include/linux/dm-*.h
 
 DIGI INTL. EPCA DRIVER
 P:	Digi International, Inc
@@ -1441,12 +1719,18 @@
 L:	Eng.Linux@digi.com
 W:	http://www.digi.com
 S:	Orphan
+F:	Documentation/serial/digiepca.txt
+F:	drivers/char/epca*
+F:	drivers/char/digi*
 
 DIRECTORY NOTIFICATION (DNOTIFY)
 P:	Stephen Rothwell
 M:	sfr@canb.auug.org.au
 L:	linux-kernel@vger.kernel.org
 S:	Supported
+F:	Documentation/filesystems/dnotify.txt
+F:	fs/notify/dnotify/
+F:	include/linux/dnotify.h
 
 DISK GEOMETRY AND PARTITION HANDLING
 P:	Andries Brouwer
@@ -1461,6 +1745,9 @@
 M:	jack@suse.cz
 L:	linux-kernel@vger.kernel.org
 S:	Maintained
+F:	Documentation/filesystems/quota.txt
+F:	fs/quota/
+F:	include/linux/quota*.h
 
 DISTRIBUTED LOCK MANAGER (DLM)
 P:	Christine Caulfield
@@ -1469,8 +1756,9 @@
 M:	teigland@redhat.com
 L:	cluster-devel@redhat.com
 W:	http://sources.redhat.com/cluster/
-T:	git kernel.org:/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/teigland/dlm.git
+T:	git git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/teigland/dlm.git
 S:	Supported
+F:	fs/dlm/
 
 DMA GENERIC OFFLOAD ENGINE SUBSYSTEM
 P:	Maciej Sosnowski
@@ -1479,12 +1767,16 @@
 M:	dan.j.williams@intel.com
 L:	linux-kernel@vger.kernel.org
 S:	Supported
+F:	drivers/dma/
+F:	include/linux/dma*
 
 DME1737 HARDWARE MONITOR DRIVER
 P:	Juerg Haefliger
 M:	juergh@gmail.com
 L:	lm-sensors@lm-sensors.org
 S:	Maintained
+F:	Documentation/hwmon/dme1737
+F:	drivers/hwmon/dme1737.c
 
 DOCBOOK FOR DOCUMENTATION
 P:	Randy Dunlap
@@ -1496,18 +1788,22 @@
 M:	shaohua.li@intel.com
 L:	linux-acpi@vger.kernel.org
 S:	Supported
+F:	drivers/acpi/dock.c
 
-DOCUMENTATION (/Documentation directory)
+DOCUMENTATION
 P:	Randy Dunlap
 M:	rdunlap@xenotime.net
 L:	linux-doc@vger.kernel.org
 S:	Maintained
+F:	Documentation/
 
 DOUBLETALK DRIVER
 P:	James R. Van Zandt
 M:	jrv@vanzandt.mv.com
 L:	blinux-list@redhat.com
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/char/dtlk.c
+F:	include/linux/dtlk.h
 
 DPT_I2O SCSI RAID DRIVER
 P:	Adaptec OEM Raid Solutions
@@ -1515,6 +1811,8 @@
 L:	linux-scsi@vger.kernel.org
 W:	http://www.adaptec.com/
 S:	Maintained
+F:	drivers/scsi/dpt*
+F:	drivers/scsi/dpt/
 
 DRIVER CORE, KOBJECTS, AND SYSFS
 P:	Greg Kroah-Hartman
@@ -1522,49 +1820,55 @@
 L:	linux-kernel@vger.kernel.org
 T:	quilt kernel.org/pub/linux/kernel/people/gregkh/gregkh-2.6/
 S:	Supported
+F:	Documentation/kobject.txt
+F:	drivers/base/
+F:	fs/sysfs/
+F:	include/linux/kobj*